Saturday, June 30, 2018

Fwd: Quinoa Recipe


We just published a delicious quinoa recipe complete with step-by-step pictures and detailed instructions. You can find it here: https://www.jenreviews.com/quinoa-recipe/

Money $ Re: The Chicago Plan (Swiss Vote)

Money is needed for transactions.
The frequency of transactions vary over the business cycle and has trends.

Money supply must expand and contract as conditions change
to prevent inflation or deflation or death or revolution
when people don't have the money needed
to buy food, medicine, supplies, etc.

Bank loans automatically expand in booms when more money is needed
and contracts in busts when less money is needed.
Pro-cyclical.

Government is counter-cyclical - automatic stabilizers.
Government spends more on welfare unemployment etc. in recessions and less on these programs in booms.
So runs a deficit and issues bonds when less money is needed for transactions.

Forcing the money supply to depend on government debt would be counter productive.

Money need not depend on any debt at all.

Democratic governments can increase or decrease the money supply by legislative fiat.

If there is too much money they can just tax somebody to seize that excess money.

If there is too little money they can just print more money and give it to native Americans, veterans and social security recipients.

The current bank debt system just gives new money to rich bankers in liberal New York City who pay them fat bonuses and live like kings.

Sort of like Japan which has government approved mafia,
Or Russia that is run and owned by mafia,
Or China that has a red communist emperor for life.
Or North Korea, Vietnam and other communist dictatorships.
Or Saudis run by kings and nobility,
etc.
etc.

In the USA the bankers get most the money and buy all the politicians.
Or Koch that gets money from oil sold to you
Or Walmart that gets money from Muslim toxins sold to you.
………..Some are Democrats, others are Republicans
They run both parties and stage elections.

Sheeple support the system because of mind control by electronics.
So the 99% sheeple help the rich get richer and poor get poorer.

Alternative thinkers rarely show up for work or are located far from Washington DC where rules are made.
Often with addictions, diabetes, obesity,… or completely overdosed dead.

Leaving the elites in complete control.
Often poorly educated elites who make mistakes.
But those mistakes hurt the poor 99% sheeple more than the rich 1%.
So not much change.
Don't upset the applecart.
Alternative may be worse.

====================================

Japan has highest debt ratio and allegedly BOJ is majority owner in more than half of all corporations there.

Maybe THAT is the long term goal for all central banks?

A backdoor approach to Communism.

Similar with Swiss National Bank, though not necessarily in Swiss corporations.

If deep state uses cash to manipulate other gov's perhaps all those high denominations issued by the Fed,
weren't really withdrawn from public circulation but rather continue to circulate for Deep State activities.

Think back to 2009 when multiple times Asian "businessmen" were caught attempting to take 1934 gold certificates across the border from Italy to Switzerland.

It even brought up the earlier attempt by Don Johnson carrying billions to "deposit" there.

It was embarrassing for the govts involved but "no harm, no foul."

BB

Interesting read:

1)What would be the function of banks?
Currently banks hold their power over gov. because they sell the gov. debt for politicians.

2)There would need to be a consensus among countries to implement this plan.
Some countries such as Russia have little debt(a few billion) but plenty of commodities.
What if Russia simultaneously issued a gold or oil backed Ruble or even asset backed crypto Ruble?

3)In the current economic scene govs. in the US and Europe are increasingly monetizing debt as the buyer of last resort.
Using gov.issued debt as spending collateral only works if there is confidence in the underlying collateral.

4)Regarding the overlay of a cashless society:
The US gov. and European Union themselves continue to use cash for deep state operations they don't want tracked.
Billions in dollar cash and a lesser amount of Euros to Iran for a purported Nuclear "deal?"
Banks such as HSBC and Wells Fargo now laundering cash drug money?

5)Would probably result in a huge and growing barter trade or the continued use of existing paper currency .
Drugs for gold?

Ron

The Final Assault In The War On Cash

Sat, 06/23/2018 - 19:30

Dan Denning via Bonner & Partners,

Before I show you what I've learned about a plan to seize control of America's money, let me make one point clear…

If you value sound money and political freedom…
if you value limited government and taxation with representation…
and if you value enterprise and privacy…
then you're going to hate the future I'm about to describe.

There is no philosophical or monetary middle ground on the issue.

You're either with it or against it.

The Chicago Plan

In March 1933, Henry Morgenthau Jr., chairman of the Federal Farm Board, was sent a short memo titled,
"Memorandum on Banking Reform."

It was signed by Frank Knight (the acknowledged author of the memo),
Garfield Cox,
Aaron Director,
Paul Douglas,
Lloyd Mints,
Henry Schultz, and
Henry Simons.
All of them were professors at the University of Chicago.

The memorandum advocated for full-reserve banking (FRB) in the U.S. monetary system.
U.S. currency would be backed only by government debt,
not bank debt (loans issued by commercial banks to private citizens and companies).

It wouldn't nationalize the U.S. banking system.
But it would nationalize the nation's money supply.

Under this kind of system, banks could no longer "create" money by lending it into existence.
Money creation would be the exclusive territory of the government of the United States.

In this system, the key government agencies could not create money through new lending.
They would do so through new spending (on priorities determined by elected politicians).

They called it "The Chicago Plan."

The most radical elements of the plan – which we'll discuss shortly – were left on the shelf nearly a century ago.

But I believe it's about to find a resurgence in modern America…

The End of Fractional Reserve

Before I show you what the implications of a modern Chicago Plan would be, it's important you understand how money creation works today.

Despite what you may think, the central bank (the Federal Reserve) doesn't print that much money.
The vast majority of the money supply in the U.S. economy is grown by banks lending money into existence.

Commercial banks issue a loan, it appears in your account, and just like that… it's money.
From nothing, something! And then there was cash!

But here's the other part of that process that most people don't realize.
When the banks issue a loan, they don't have to have a dollar in cash in their vaults for every dollar in cash they lend.
If they DID, then every loan to a new customer would be matched with an equal amount of savings already in the bank from another customer.
That's "full reserve" banking.

What we have today is called "fractional-reserve" banking.
Why? The amount of cash savings actually held by the bank is only a fraction of the money lent by the bank.
And for each dollar in saving deposits held by the bank (your money),
the bank can lend up to $10 in new money (this is the secret magic of money creation).

It's also what some people call "debt-based" money, because money is created when a new debt is born (in the form of a bank loan).

Proponents of the Chicago Plan contend that allowing banks to create credit in a fractional reserve system leads to credit cycles.
And the credit cycle has booms and busts.
The busts damage everyone, not just those who have borrowed and spent too much.

That's a problem, they say.

To circumvent it, there are those in power actively trying to end the banking system as we know it.
They want to go back to the original idea of the Chicago Plan.
And then they want to go one step further and replace America's money with something else entirely.

America's New Money

The main feature of the Chicago Plan is that it moves credit creation from private hands to public (government) hands, with the average American unaware of who is really moving the government hands.

Money isn't lent into existence.
It's spent into existence.

You can imagine that he who does the spending in this system has great power.
That's exactly the idea!

Under the plan, instead of stimulating growth by changing the price of money for commercial banks (which is how monetary policy currently works with the Federal Reserve and interest rates), the government would "spend" money into circulation – on public works and infrastructure projects, for example.

The quantity of money in the economy would be determined by the government, not the commercial banks.
And, at least in theory, the government would enjoy vastly lower levels of debt (both absolutely, and relative to GDP) in this kind of money system. Why?

In the current system, the US Treasury raises money by selling bonds to commercial banks or the Fed, paying interest to both.
Money is created by borrowing.
But again, it's debt-based money.
That wouldn't happen in the new system.
But what would the new money be backed by?

Er… government debt!

The term "full-reserve banking" implies every unit of currency is backed by an actual reserve.
Some advocates of full-reserve banking (including a handful of Austrian economists) believe you could back the money with gold.
Thus gold would be restored as the most important reserve asset in the world.

But if your agenda is to spend money into existence in unlimited quantities, you can also use government debt as a reserve asset. There's a lot of it already. And you can always make more!

In fact, this is a key feature of the Chicago Plan. It's full-reserve banking where the government does all the money creation, "backed" by government debt.
The commercial banks merely provide payment services or pay interest on deposits.
They are forced out of the debt-based money creation business (where all the profit is, of course).

According to the theory, this new American money system would accomplish three things…

1. End the booms and busts of the credit cycle.

2. Do away with bank runs (no need to get your money out of the bank if it's fully backed).

3. Eliminate the government's debt problem.
If money can be spent into existence, government borrowing and government debts are a thing of the past.
If it needs more money, the government just spends it and "backs" it by issuing new bonds held by the central bank.
The government could never be insolvent.

Does that sound like an improvement on the current system to you? To some people, it all sounds somewhat appealing, until you look closer…

Monetary Sovereignty

Under the Chicago Plan, the government has "monetary sovereignty." What is monetary sovereignty? It is the complete decoupling of money from anything real.

Let me explain what I mean and why that's so important for the value of your savings and investments today.

Under the Chicago Plan, money doesn't have to have its roots in real value-added labor.
Money doesn't come into existence because a tradesman has created something useful and sold it to someone else, requiring money to make the transaction.

And under the new system, money certainly doesn't have to be anything physical and scarce, like gold.

Under the new system, money can be whatever the government wants it to be.

With a monetarily sovereign government calling the shots, money is literally no object.
A monetarily sovereign government wouldn't have to borrow anymore, or pay interest.
To create money, it would simply spend it into existence. Voilà!

Think of all the jobs and incomes created when a monetarily sovereign government decides to spend trillions on new infrastructure and "nation building" projects.

This is Richard Duncan's "creditism" without the need to borrow. It is economic growth without effort, wealth without labor, riches without risk.

If you think it sounds absurd, you're not alone.
But remember what's at stake here: total control of American money, and through it, of the economy, and of you.
And it'll be accomplished by controlling the quantity of money through a central authority.

For an idea of what that might look like – and why it's so dangerous to your cash and savings today – consider this quote from the innocuously titled
"The Case for Unencumbering Interest Rate Policy at the Zero Bound."

It was delivered by
Marvin Goodfriend of
Carnegie Mellon University at the
Fed's annual retreat in Jackson Hole, Wyoming in 2016

The most straightforward way to unencumber interest rate policy completely at the zero bound is to abolish paper currency.
In principle, abolishing paper currency would be effective, would not need new technology, and would not need institutional modifications.
However, the public would be deprived of the widely used bundle of services that paper currency uniquely provides.

[…] Hence, the public is likely to resist the abolition of paper currency at least until mobile access to bank deposits becomes cheaper and more easily available.

First, we have a proposal for a new system in which only the government can create money.
Next, the "experts" think the most logical way to
"unencumber" ineffective monetary policy is to
abolish cash.

Goodfriend, by the way, was nominated by President Trump to serve on the Federal Reserve's seven-member Board of Governors.
His nomination is currently awaiting action by the U.S. Senate.

Taken together, there is a real effort underway to
do away with
your individual economic liberty and
your preference to hold cash in the face of interest rate uncertainty.
"If that could be overcome,"
Goodfriend seems to be saying,
"then we could make you act the way we want you to."

Am I exaggerating?
Would Wall Street allow such a fundamental change to America's banking system?
Would the Fed really abolish cash? Is there a possibility of all of this becoming a reality?

It's happening faster than you think.

For example, the Swiss recently voted on implementing a version of the Chicago Plan earlier this month.
They ultimately voted it down, but the fact that such a plan was considered in the first place shows that this idea is coming back into the mainstream.

Also, keep in mind that the Swiss, due to their constitution, get to vote on these kinds of things.
It's a direct democracy, controlled at the local level.
Top-down change – the kind of change which tends to benefit the elites and those in the shadows of power – is very hard to achieve in Switzerland.
But in the United States…?

What would it take for elected officials, and the American voters, to decide that the banks can no longer be trusted?
What would it take for politicians and voters to agree that it's time to end "too big to fail" banks and change the financial system so "the people" (through their elected officials, of course) can be in charge of the money system?

A stock market crash?

Another "systemically important bank" collapse?

A sovereign debt crisis?

The catalyst could come from anywhere, or nowhere.
And if you think it's out of the realm of possibility, then you lack imagination, or an understanding of history.

In Defense of Economic Liberty

In a world where government has unrestricted control of the money, and hiding in physical cash is no longer an option
(because cash has been abolished),
there's no end to what a monetary sovereign could force you to do.

Control of money is a massive political power.
What would happen next?

Outlawing cryptos?

Forcing negative interest rates (effectively a tax on your savings)?

Banning the purchase of items that the government deems undesirable, like weapons, alcohol, or cigarettes?

These may seem far-fetched scenarios.
But they are well within the realm of possibility for a government in complete control of the money in your account.

This was the plan in 1933.
It almost happened.
I believe it is the plan today.
And I believe it WILL happen.
Much sooner than you think.
Which is why you must plan for it NOW.

This is not a theoretical debate.
What, exactly, is at stake for you right now?

This idea of sovereign money appeals to central planners because with it, they have absolute authority and permission to try and solve any "problem" they deem a threat.

You are that threat, because you won't do what you're told.
You won't spend when you're supposed to spend, borrow when you're supposed to borrow.
And you're likely to hoard cash and real money (precious metals) in the face of low (or negative) interest rates.
That makes you an uncompliant problem for the State to solve.

When you pair it with banning cash and going all-digital, you have nothing less than the complete loss of economic liberty and freedom of action in America.
THAT's what's at stake here.
Right now.

If you're in a situation where you can only spend money when you're allowed to spend money, or you can only spend money that they say is money, and you can only spend money when they think it's okay, then you're not free.

And to some people, freedom still matters in America.

Thursday, June 28, 2018

Hot day Latino juggler

Get skinny
Juggle all day in the sun
Dance to the music
On campus daily
Barefoot in heat or cold
Exercise is very important to health.

96 hi

Was cool and wet 2 days ago
3 thunderstorms in 3 days
Woke me up very
Loud thunder

Wind from south and west blows in hot weather
First days of summer
I go out and suntan at noon
Feels good

Eugene Oregon has 0 sales tax and cool weather white people

Texas A&M has hi sales tax and very hot weather brown Black people

Hard to exercise hard in hot weather.
Race war?
Civil war?
California secede?

Wednesday, June 27, 2018

nota roja - Google Search

Nota roja - Wikipedia

Dixie Mafia - Wikipedia

Cholesterol: Did Jelly Beans cause Reagan's Alzheimer?

Reagan probably had dementia long before announced - it does not happen suddenly usually.
Caused bad judgement:
Iran-Contra scandal
Amnesty for illegal Aliens that has led to problems today Trump is trying to solve but he probably has dementia too.
Etc.

Rich people and politicians often get huge amounts of Cholesterol from expensive animal sources.
But presidential diet is monitored carefully so Reagan may have been low fat.

Human body makes huge amounts of Cholesterol in Liver out of fructose in the diet that would have been in a low fat diet.
If you eat lots of garlic you get lots of sulfur compounds.
Then if you get lots of sunshine then your skin will combine the cholesterol with sulfur.
Cholesterol sulfate is water soluble and can get to your brain and all parts of the body where needed.
Brain and heart needs the most cholesterol.

Without eating any cholesterol in the diet you can get enough cholesterol but the size of molecules is wrong.
Eggs and butter have large fluffy varieties of Cholesterol containing fatty acid molecules that float thru the blood easily.
The small grainy molecules from sugar flour are like sandpaper that tears up and inflames your arteries leading to scarring and hardening of the arteries like concrete.
Then high blood pressure, stroke, heart attack, etc.
Some dementia is caused by lots of mini-strokes, lack of blood flow to some parts of brain, slow degradation of function.

Reagan got lots of sugar from the jellybeans etc.
Probably some terrible chemicals too in the dyes and flavors.
Probably some biographies would shed light on exactly what else he was eating.

---------------------------------------------


From: Ron

Be interesting to know if Reagan maintained a low cholesterol diet (gaining popularity) during that era. 

A low cholesterol diet will increase risk of a neurological disorder such Alzheimer's or Parkinson's by about 60%.

( Dr.Joel Wallach ,Dr. Mercola, Dr.Blaylock; retired neurosurgeon).


From: Ruthe

Sugar and food color dyes can't be good !
He lived a pretty good long life.


From: joe 

Do you think Jelly Beans might have caused Reagan's Alzheimer's?

Tom wrote:

I wonder if you think that Reagan's habit of eating jelly beans throughout the day might have caused insulin-glucose problems that could have been implicated in his getting Alzheimer's?

Which do you think is the greatest villain -- low HGH or insulin blood sugar derangement?

[Hello Tom... 

I didn't know that President Reagan had a habit of eating jelly beans all day long... but if this is true, then very definitely, I think it is related to his getting Alzheimer's... I'm sure that he would have had blood glucose way above 120 for much of the day... maybe higher than 150 or 160. There is no way we can know, unless somebody was keeping track of his blood glucose, but that would be unlikely, especially in those days. In any case, any candy is 75% SUGAR, so if he ate a lot of it, it would have kept his blood glucose sky high all day long.

High Blood Sugar is much worse than low HGH... In fact, I would bet that it CAUSES LOWER HGH than he would have had otherwise.

High blood sugar for many years without any doubt would have affected his brain and all his nervous system. It would also have affected his kidneys (which would have affected his red blood cell count, which would have lowered oxygen to the brain...,) all of his circulatory system, his pancreas, and blood insulin levels too... etc....

And it would have caused his HGH to be extremely low...

If we could see his blood tests, I would bet that HGH would be below 100... insulin above 10... hematocrit below 42... hemoglobin below 13.9 He might have had problems with vision...

I will bet he had at least 115 fasting glucose levels.

The single best anti aging therapy, even better than injectible growth hormone (or replacing several hormones) is: "Keep your glucose levels under control." Here is my table of how I interpret blood glucose:

50 mg/dl Very low 
60 mg/dl Low 
70 mg/dl Optimum 
85 mg/dl Optimum 
100 mg/dl High 
110 mg/dl Very high 
120 mg/dl Bad 
140 mg/dl Terrible 
160 mg/dl Horrible 
180 mg/dl Deathly 
200 mg/dl and higher: Suicidal

This table differs from others I have sent before because I have decided that 90 mg/dl is a wee bit too high... I like 85 better. Of course I still get 90 most of the time, but now I am not as happy with it as I was before.


Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Products – Juvenon.com

http://juvenon.com/products/

rainbow islands seb - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?client=safari&hl=en-us&ei=Ac8yW5OdOsbUsAWPj6e4CA&q=rainbow+islands+seb&oq=rainbow+islands+seb&gs_l=mobile-gws-wiz-serp.3..0i22i30l2j33i160l3.3851.7523..8357...0....220.1389.0j7j2......0....1.........0j0i71j0i67.5poP3t9karA%3D

Sandra Nasić - Wikipedia

Sandra Nasić - Wikipedia

Sandra Nasić

Sandra Nasić (born 25 May 1976) is a German singer, best known as the lead singer of the rock band Guano Apes. She was born to Croatian parents.

Sandra Nasić
Guano Apes beim Open Flair 2015 (016 by Yellowcard).jpg
Sandra Nasić on stage with the Guano Apes in 2015
Background information
Born 25 May 1976 (age 42)
Göttingen, Germany
Genres Alternative rock, alternative metal, nu metal, pop rock, rapcore[citation needed]
Occupation(s) Singer
Years active 1994–present
Associated acts Guano Apes

CareerEdit

Sandra Nasić was born in Göttingen, Germany, where she grew up with her Croatian mother and her sister. After she had received her high school diploma, Nasić considered studying design, but decided to pursue a music career with the Guano Apes, which she joined in 1994. The band's career took off in 1996 after they won the "Local Heroes" competition held by VIVA, beating out over 1000 competitors with their song "Open Your Eyes". The Guano Apes debut album Proud Like a God peaked at No. 4 in Germany in 1997. Their next two albums, Don't Give Me Names (2000) and Walking on a Thin Line (2003) both reached No. 1. The Guano Apes broke up in February 2005, following touring.

Whilst still with the Guano Apes, Nasić featured on Apocalyptica's 2001 single Path Vol. 2, which reached No. 4 in Finland,[1] and on DJ Tomekk's 2003 single Beat Of Life (along with Ice-T and Trigga Tha Gambla) which reached No. 12 in Germany.[2]

During the Guano Apes hiatus, Nasić released her first solo recording, the single Fever, which peaked at No. 64 in Germany. Her debut album, The Signal,[3] peaked at No. 46.[4]

In 2009 the Guano Apes reformed and commenced touring. They released their fourth album, Bel Air, in 2011. It reached No. 1 in Germany.

From August until November 2012, Nasić was on the jury of the third season of X factor, along with Sarah Connor, H.P. Baxxter and Moses Pelham.[5]

ReferencesEdit

Eton Grundig Field BT AM/FM/Shortwave Radio with Bluetooth Streaming-NGWFBTB - The Home Depot

https://www.homedepot.com/p/Eton-Grundig-Field-BT-AM-FM-Shortwave-Radio-with-Bluetooth-Streaming-NGWFBTB/303010294

Monday, June 25, 2018

Did Jelly Beans cause Reagan's Alzheimer?


Best of Rejuvenation... Did Jelly Beans cause Reagan's Alzheimer?

Do you think Jelly Beans might have caused Reagan's Alzheimer's?

Tom wrote:

I wonder if you think that Reagan's habit of eating jelly beans throughout the day might have caused insulin-glucose problems that could have been implicated in his getting Alzheimer's?

Which do you think is the greatest villain -- low HGH or insulin blood sugar derangement?

[Hello Tom...

I didn't know that President Reagan had a habit of eating jelly beans all day long... but if this is true, then very definitely, I think it is related to his getting Alzheimer's... I'm sure that he would have had blood glucose way above 120 for much of the day... maybe higher than 150 or 160. There is no way we can know, unless somebody was keeping track of his blood glucose, but that would be unlikely, especially in those days. In any case, any candy is 75% SUGAR, so if he ate a lot of it, it would have kept his blood glucose sky high all day long.

High Blood Sugar is much worse than low HGH... In fact, I would bet that it CAUSES LOWER HGH than he would have had otherwise.

High blood sugar for many years without any doubt would have affected his brain and all his nervous system. It would also have affected his kidneys (which would have affected his red blood cell count, which would have lowered oxygen to the brain...,) all of his circulatory system, his pancreas, and blood insulin levels too... etc....

And it would have caused his HGH to be extremely low...

If we could see his blood tests, I would bet that HGH would be below 100... insulin above 10... hematocrit below 42... hemoglobin below 13.9 He might have had problems with vision...

I will bet he had at least 115 fasting glucose levels.

The single best anti aging therapy, even better than injectible growth hormone (or replacing several hormones) is: "Keep your glucose levels under control." Here is my table of how I interpret blood glucose:

50 mg/dl Very low
60 mg/dl Low
70 mg/dl Optimum
85 mg/dl Optimum
100 mg/dl High
110 mg/dl Very high
120 mg/dl Bad
140 mg/dl Terrible
160 mg/dl Horrible
180 mg/dl Deathly
200 mg/dl and higher: Suicidal

This table differs from others I have sent before because I have decided that 90 mg/dl is a wee bit too high... I like 85 better. Of course I still get 90 most of the time, but now I am not as happy with it as I was before.


Evil Lies - All Out PROPAGANDA WAR By The Left Continues..... Attempt To Destroy THIS President - The Ingraham Angle 6/22/18 | FoxNews

Evil Lies - All Out PROPAGANDA WAR By The Left Continues..... Attempt To Destroy THIS President - The Ingraham Angle 6/22/18 | FoxNews Today June 22, 2018







Sunday, June 24, 2018

agent sparks polly anne - Google Search

https://www.google.com/search?q=agent+sparks+polly+anne&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari

Seth Rich's complains about "conspiracy" but won't investigate his murder



 

Obama Admin Attorneys Team with Seth Rich's Brother – Sue Private Eye Team Investigating Seth Rich

 

A team of private eyes investigating the death of Seth Rich are facing two major lawsuits prosecuted by high-powered Democratic establishment attorneys for uncovering evidence that insinuates the slain DNC staffer's murder was politically motivated.

Aaron Rich, the brother of Seth Rich, filed a lawsuit in April in US District Court in the District of Columbia, against America First Media accusing conservative activist Matt Couch and other individuals and media organizations for peddling "false and unfounded claims" about him and acting "with reckless disregard for the truth."

The lawyer representing Aaron Rich, Michael J. Gottlieb, recently concluded four years of service with the Obama Administration.

A second attorney prosecuting Aaron Rich's case is David Boies, chairman of the law firm Boies, Schiller & Flexner. 

In an interview with The Gateway Pundit, Matt Couch questioned how Rich, whose family couldn't afford a private investigator, is able to afford the high powered legal team comprised of Obama's White House counsel.

"This is who Aaron Rich gets to represent against our team – can you imagine what it would charge to hire Harvey Weinstein's defense lawyer?  I don't know how Rich hired these attorneys – the Rich family couldn't even afford a private investigator, that's why Ed Butowski offered to pay for Rod Wheeler," he said. "But now they can afford the most expensive and powerful Democratic law firms in the country – how does that happen?"

The suit is the Democratic establishment's attempt to stifle independent investigations, Couch argued,  because if the DNC truly wanted justice for Rich they would have offered reward money to find Rich's killers and would have availed its server to the FBI after the alleged hack.


Saturday, June 23, 2018

Best of Rejuvenation... Did Jelly Beans cause Reagan's Alzheimer?

Best of Rejuvenation... Did Jelly Beans cause Reagan's Alzheimer?

Do you think Jelly Beans might have caused Reagan's Alzheimer's?

Tom wrote:

I wonder if you think that Reagan's habit of eating jelly beans throughout the day might have caused insulin-glucose problems that could have been implicated in his getting Alzheimer's?

Which do you think is the greatest villain -- low HGH or insulin blood sugar derangement?

[Hello Tom...

I didn't know that President Reagan had a habit of eating jelly beans all day long... but if this is true, then very definitely, I think it is related to his getting Alzheimer's... I'm sure that he would have had blood glucose way above 120 for much of the day... maybe higher than 150 or 160. There is no way we can know, unless somebody was keeping track of his blood glucose, but that would be unlikely, especially in those days. In any case, any candy is 75% SUGAR, so if he ate a lot of it, it would have kept his blood glucose sky high all day long.

High Blood Sugar is much worse than low HGH... In fact, I would bet that it CAUSES LOWER HGH than he would have had otherwise.

High blood sugar for many years without any doubt would have affected his brain and all his nervous system. It would also have affected his kidneys (which would have affected his red blood cell count, which would have lowered oxygen to the brain...,) all of his circulatory system, his pancreas, and blood insulin levels too... etc....

And it would have caused his HGH to be extremely low...

If we could see his blood tests, I would bet that HGH would be below 100... insulin above 10... hematocrit below 42... hemoglobin below 13.9 He might have had problems with vision...

I will bet he had at least 115 fasting glucose levels.

The single best anti aging therapy, even better than injectible growth hormone (or replacing several hormones) is: "Keep your glucose levels under control." Here is my table of how I interpret blood glucose:

50 mg/dl Very low
60 mg/dl Low
70 mg/dl Optimum
85 mg/dl Optimum
100 mg/dl High
110 mg/dl Very high
120 mg/dl Bad
140 mg/dl Terrible
160 mg/dl Horrible
180 mg/dl Deathly
200 mg/dl and higher: Suicidal

This table differs from others I have sent before because I have decided that 90 mg/dl is a wee bit too high... I like 85 better. Of course I still get 90 most of the time, but now I am not as happy with it as I was before.

Thanks for writing,

- Ellis]

Armenia Colorado. by latitude

Altitude 4444-5555 feet
Latitude 40 degrees
Similar At Colorado Utah Nevada
Bright sun
Good health
Some areas organic low population pesticides.
Too dry rocky for gmo mass agriculture poisons.
But bowl valleys may collect smog.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_population_centers_by_latitude

Friday, June 22, 2018

Nazi Ancestry Records, attack by your enemies

White people are dying faster than being born in America.
Population replacement by Muslims and Mexicans etc.
Project well under way.

Obama can attack you by attacking your friends and family.
China and Russia and your enemies can do the same.
OPM data breach put all that data for sale illegally so you can be attacked.
If something bad happens you will not be able to find out who is attacking you.
Your genetics and ancestry data enables diabolical attacks.

Germans can find their Ancestry back to 1600s in Germany by work of Nazis.
Mormon records enable attacks on many more populations.
Interesting conversation:

———————————————————————————

Yes, we have little, if any, privacy anymore.

My take on this is that they obviously have so much data that there is little if any chance that they would try to single me or my affairs out, so I don't worry about it too much.

However, in Germany they did do this under National Socialism.

They used church records, and when I went to Germany, I found my geneology all packaged up and neatly arranged in my family Lutheran Church.

When I asked who did this, I found that during the early 30's and 40's the government sent Gestapo specialists to identify all church members.

My family history was layed out neatly all the way back to the 1600's.
I was amazed.
Found out from Karl Walther that this happened to everybody.

With these data breaches today, they might be interested in doing the same thing.

Could be looking for political affiliation, which is scary.

Let's hope that the concentration camp days are truly over.

---------------------------------------------------------------

Communist dictatorship north Korea still has nukes and missiles.

Vietnam is still communist.

China is still a communist dictatorship with dictator recently declared dictator for life.

Now China has stolen your personal information, maybe.

I don't know how recently you filled out any forms but probably high rank military and maybe many professors got nailed in this theft.

Universities and faculty runs on government grants, often on classified and patentable technologies.

Outrageous breach.
They did not even encrypt the information before putting it online for all to access.
Big government cannot be trusted with data.
Deep state incompetence.

Probably everybody should change their name and social security number and date of birth, and places of birth.

Rename all the streets in the USA?

So addresses cannot be tracked by Russia, China, enemies,…
Hard to fix problems so bad.
Like closing the barn door after the cows got out.

Minorities rapidly becoming the majority.
Country going down the tubes.
Can't even do basic computer stuff.
Those in charge - Archuleta and Seymour probably women or transgender.

Archuleta to resign citing mismanagement and that
she was a political appointee
and former Obama campaign official
with no degree or experience in human resources.

---------------------------------------------------

Office of Personnel Management data breach

In June 2015, the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced that it had been the target of a data breach targeting the records of as many as four million people.

The final estimate of the number of stolen records is approximately 21.5 million.

This includes records of people who had undergone background checks, but who were not necessarily current or former government employees.

It has been described by federal officials as among the largest breaches of government data in the history of the United States.

Information targeted in the breach included personally identifiable information such as Social Security numbers, as well as names, dates and places of birth, and addresses.

The data breach consisted of two separate, but linked, attacks.

It is unclear when the first attack occurred but the second attack happened on May 7, 2014 when attackers posed as an employee of KeyPoint Government Solutions, a subcontracting company.

The first attack was discovered March 20, 2014, but the second attack was not discovered until April 15, 2015.

In the aftermath of the event,

Katherine Archuleta, the director of OPM,
and the CIO, Donna Seymour,
resigned.

On August 27, 2017, the FBI arrested a Chinese national suspected of helping to create the malware used in the breach.

Discovery

The first breach, named "X1" by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), was discovered March 20, 2014 when a third party notified DHS of data exfiltration from OPM's network.

With regards to the second breach, named "X2", the New York Times had reported that the infiltration was discovered using United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT)'s Einstein intrusion-detection program.

However, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, Ars Technica, and Fortune later reported that it was unclear how the breach was discovered.

They reported that it may have been a product demonstration of CyFIR, a commercial forensic product from a Manassas, Virginia security company CyTech Services that uncovered the infiltration.

These reports were subsequently discussed by CyTech Services in a press release issued by the company on June 15, 2015 to clarify contradictions made by OPM spokesman Sam Schumach in a later edit of the Fortune article.

However, it was not CyTech Services that uncovered the infiltration; rather, it was detected by OPM personnel using a software product of vendor Cylance.

Ultimately, the conclusive House of Representatives' Majority Staff Report on the OPM breach discovered

no evidence suggesting that CyTech Services knew of Cylance's involvement or had prior knowledge of an existing breach at the time of its product demonstration,

leading to the finding that both tools independently "discovered" the malicious code running on the OPM network.

Data theft

Theft of security clearance information

On June 11, 2015, ABC News also said that highly sensitive 127-page Standard Forms (SF) 86 (Questionnaire for National Security Positions) were put at serious risk by the hack.

SF-86 forms contain information about family members, college roommates, foreign contacts, and psychological information.

At the time, OPM stated that family members names were not compromised.

However, on June 13, 2015, OPM spokesman Samuel Schumach said that investigators had "a high degree of confidence that OPM systems containing information related to the background investigations of current, former, and prospective federal government employees, to include U.S. military personnel, and those for whom a federal background investigation was conducted, may have been exfiltrated."

The Central Intelligence Agency, however, does not use the OPM system; therefore, it may not have been affected.

Theft of personal details

J. David Cox, president of the American Federation of Government Employees, wrote in a letter to OPM director Katherine Archuleta that, based on the incomplete information that the AFGE had received from OPM,

"We believe that the Central Personnel Data File was the targeted database, and that the hackers are now in possession of all personnel data for every federal employee, every federal retiree, and up to one million former federal employees."

Cox stated that the AFGE believes that the breach compromised military records, veterans' status information, addresses, dates of birth, job and pay history, health insurance and life insurance information, pension information, and data on age, gender, and race.

Theft of fingerprints

The stolen data included 5.6 million sets of fingerprints.

Biometrics expert Ramesh Kesanupalli said that because of this, secret agents were no longer safe, as they could be identified by their fingerprints, even if their names had been changed.

Perpetrators

According to the Wall Street Journal, U.S. government officials suspect that Chinese hackers perpetrated the breach.

The Washington Post has also reported that the attack originated in China, citing unnamed government officials.

China has responded to these claims by noting that it has been the target of cyberattacks in the past.

The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform report on the breach strongly suggested the attackers were state actors due to the use of a very specific and highly-developed piece of malware.

U.S. Department of Homeland Security official Andy Ozment testified that the attackers had gained valid user credentials to the systems they were attacking, likely through social engineering.

The breach also consisted of a malware package which installed itself within OPM's network and established a backdoor.

From there, attackers escalated their privileges to gain access to a wide range of OPM's systems.

Ars Technica reported that at least one worker with root access to every row in every database was physically located in China.

Another contractor had two employees with Chinese passports.

Motive

Whether the attack was motivated by commercial gain remains unclear.

It has been suggested that hackers working for the Chinese military intend to compile a database of Americans using the data obtained from the breach.

Warnings

The OPM had been warned multiple times of security vulnerabilities and failings.

A March 2015 OPM Office of the Inspector General semi-annual report to Congress warned of

"persistent deficiencies in OPM's information system security program," including

"incomplete security authorization packages, weaknesses in testing of information security controls, and inaccurate Plans of Action and Milestones."

A July 2014 story in The New York Times quoted unnamed senior American officials saying that Chinese hackers had broken into OPM.

The officials said that the hackers seemed to be targeting files on workers who had applied for security clearances, and had gained access to several databases, but had been stopped before they obtained the security clearance information.

In an interview later that month,
Katherine Archuleta, the director of OPM, said that the most important thing was that no personal identification information had been compromised.

Pointing blame

Some lawmakers made calls for Archuleta to resign citing mismanagement and that she was a political appointee and former Obama campaign official with no degree or experience in human resources.

She responded that neither she nor OPM chief information officer Donna Seymour would do so.

"I am committed to the work that I am doing at OPM," Archuleta told reporters.
"I have trust in the staff that is there."
On July 10, 2015, Archuleta resigned as OPM director.

Daniel Henninger, deputy editorial page director of the Wall Street Journal, speaking on Fox News' Journal Editorial Report, criticized the appointment of Archuleta to be "in charge of one of the most sensitive agencies" in the U.S. government, saying:

"What is her experience to run something like that? She was the national political director of Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign.
She's also the head of something called the Latina Initiative.
She's a politico, right? ... That is the kind of person they have put in."

Security experts have stated that the biggest problem with the breach was not the failure to prevent remote break-ins, but the absence of mechanisms to detect outside intrusion and the lack of proper encryption of sensitive data.

OPM CIO Donna Seymour countered that criticism by pointed to the agency's aging systems as the primary obstacle to putting such protections in place, despite having encryption tools available.

DHS Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications Andy Ozment explained further that,

"If an adversary has the credentials of a user on the network, then they can access data even if it's encrypted, just as the users on the network have to access data, and that did occur in this case.

So encryption in this instance would not have protected this data."

Investigation

A July 22, 2015 memo by Inspector General Patrick McFarland said that OPM's Chief Information Officer Donna Seymour was slowing her investigation into the breach, leading him to wonder whether or not she was acting in good faith.

He did not raise any specific claims of misconduct, but he did say that her office was fostering an "atmosphere of mistrust" by giving him "incorrect or misleading" information.

On Monday 22 February 2016, CIO Donna Seymour resigned, just two days before she was scheduled to testify before a House panel that is continuing to investigate the data breach.

Reactions

FBI Director James Comey stated: "It is a very big deal from a national security perspective and from a counterintelligence perspective.
It's a treasure trove of information about everybody who has worked for, tried to work for, or works for the United States government."

Speaking at a forum in Washington, D.C., Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said: "You have to kind of salute the Chinese for what they did."

President-elect Donald Trump said: "China, relatively recently, hacked 20 million government names.
How come nobody even talks about that?"

Thursday, June 21, 2018

MPIR: Multiple Precision Integers and Rationals

The State With the Most Psychopaths | Newser Mobile

The State With the Most Psychopaths | Newser Mobile

The State With the Most Psychopaths | Newser Mobile

(Newser) – Surprise, surprise: The place home to the most psychopaths in the US is Washington, DC. By far. That's according to new research out of Southern Methodist University. The survey doesn't count actual diagnoses but extrapolates from earlier research on the distribution of the "big five" personality traits (extraversion, neuroticism, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience) across the country, per ScienceAlert. DC came in with a score of 3.48, far outpacing the next highest score—1.89 in Connecticut. One big caveat: Researchers say DC is a tiny, highly populated urban area compared to the states, and thus might be considered an outlier in the survey. Still, the ranking jibes with the theory that "psychopaths are likely to be effective in the political sphere," writes SMU's Ryan Murphy. The highest- and lowest-ranked states follow:

Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Inside the OPM Hack, The Cyberattack that Shocked the US Government | WIRED

https://www.wired.com/2016/10/inside-cyberattack-shocked-us-government/

Office of Personnel Management data breach

Office of Personnel Management data breach - Wikipedia
Outrageous

Big government cannot be trusted with government

Deep state incompetence. 

Office of Personnel Management data breach

In June 2015, the United States Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced that it had been the target of a data breach targeting the records of as many as four million people.[1] The final estimate of the number of stolen records is approximately 21.5 million. This includes records of people who had undergone background checks, but who were not necessarily current or former government employees.[2] It has been described by federal officials as among the largest breaches of government data in the history of the United States.[1] Information targeted in the breach included personally identifiable information such as Social Security numbers,[3] as well as names, dates and places of birth, and addresses.[4]

The data breach consisted of two separate, but linked, attacks.[5] It is unclear when the first attack occurred but the second attack happened on May 7, 2014 when attackers posed as an employee of KeyPoint Government Solutions, a subcontracting company. The first attack was discovered March 20, 2014, but the second attack was not discovered until April 15, 2015.[5]

In the aftermath of the event, Katherine Archuleta, the director of OPM, and the CIO, Donna Seymour, resigned.[6]

On August 27, 2017, the FBI arrested a Chinese national suspected of helping to create the malware used in the breach.[7]

DiscoveryEdit

The first breach, named "X1" by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), was discovered March 20, 2014 when a third party notified DHS of data exfiltration from OPM's network.[5]

With regards to the second breach, named "X2", the New York Times had reported that the infiltration was discovered using United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT)'s Einstein intrusion-detection program.[8] However, the Wall Street Journal, Wired, Ars Technica, and Fortune later reported that it was unclear how the breach was discovered. They reported that it may have been a product demonstration of CyFIR, a commercial forensic product from a Manassas, Virginia security company CyTech Services that uncovered the infiltration.[9][10][11][12] These reports were subsequently discussed by CyTech Services in a press release issued by the company on June 15, 2015[13] to clarify contradictions made by OPM spokesman Sam Schumach in a later edit of the Fortune[9] article. However, it was not CyTech Services that uncovered the infiltration; rather, it was detected by OPM personnel using a software product of vendor Cylance.[14][15] Ultimately, the conclusive House of Representatives' Majority Staff Report on the OPM breach discovered no evidence suggesting that CyTech Services knew of Cylance's involvement or had prior knowledge of an existing breach at the time of its product demonstration, leading to the finding that both tools independently "discovered" the malicious code running on the OPM network.[5]

Data theftEdit

Theft of security clearance informationEdit

On June 11, 2015, ABC News also said that highly sensitive 127-page Standard Forms (SF) 86 (Questionnaire for National Security Positions) were put at serious risk by the hack. SF-86 forms contain information about family members, college roommates, foreign contacts, and psychological information. At the time, OPM stated that family members names were not compromised.[16] However, on June 13, 2015, OPM spokesman Samuel Schumach said that investigators had "a high degree of confidence that OPM systems containing information related to the background investigations of current, former, and prospective federal government employees, to include U.S. military personnel, and those for whom a federal background investigation was conducted, may have been exfiltrated."[17] The Central Intelligence Agency, however, does not use the OPM system; therefore, it may not have been affected.[18]

Theft of personal detailsEdit

J. David Cox, president of the American Federation of Government Employees, wrote in a letter to OPM director Katherine Archuleta that, based on the incomplete information that the AFGE had received from OPM, "We believe that the Central Personnel Data File was the targeted database, and that the hackers are now in possession of all personnel data for every federal employee, every federal retiree, and up to one million former federal employees."[19] Cox stated that the AFGE believes that the breach compromised military records, veterans' status information, addresses, dates of birth, job and pay history, health insurance and life insurance information, pension information, and data on age, gender, and race.[19]

Theft of fingerprintsEdit

The stolen data included 5.6 million sets of fingerprints.[20] Biometrics expert Ramesh Kesanupalli said that because of this, secret agents were no longer safe, as they could be identified by their fingerprints, even if their names had been changed.[21]

PerpetratorsEdit

According to the Wall Street Journal, U.S. government officials suspect that Chinese hackers perpetrated the breach.[1] The Washington Post has also reported that the attack originated in China, citing unnamed government officials.[4] China has responded to these claims by noting that it has been the target of cyberattacks in the past.[22] The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform report on the breach strongly suggested the attackers were state actors due to the use of a very specific and highly-developed piece of malware.[5] U.S. Department of Homeland Security official Andy Ozment testified that the attackers had gained valid user credentials to the systems they were attacking, likely through social engineering. The breach also consisted of a malware package which installed itself within OPM's network and established a backdoor. From there, attackers escalated their privileges to gain access to a wide range of OPM's systems. Ars Technica reported that at least one worker with root access to every row in every database was physically located in China. Another contractor had two employees with Chinese passports.[23]

MotiveEdit

Whether the attack was motivated by commercial gain remains unclear.[8] It has been suggested that hackers working for the Chinese military intend to compile a database of Americans using the data obtained from the breach.[22]

WarningsEdit

The OPM had been warned multiple times of security vulnerabilities and failings. A March 2015 OPM Office of the Inspector General semi-annual report to Congress warned of "persistent deficiencies in OPM's information system security program," including "incomplete security authorization packages, weaknesses in testing of information security controls, and inaccurate Plans of Action and Milestones."[24][25]

A July 2014 story in The New York Times quoted unnamed senior American officials saying that Chinese hackers had broken into OPM. The officials said that the hackers seemed to be targeting files on workers who had applied for security clearances, and had gained access to several databases, but had been stopped before they obtained the security clearance information. In an interview later that month, Katherine Archuleta, the director of OPM, said that the most important thing was that no personal identification information had been compromised.[18][26][27]

Pointing blameEdit

Some lawmakers made calls for Archuleta to resign citing mismanagement and that she was a political appointee and former Obama campaign official with no degree or experience in human resources. She responded that neither she nor OPM chief information officer Donna Seymour would do so. "I am committed to the work that I am doing at OPM," Archuleta told reporters. "I have trust in the staff that is there."[2] On July 10, 2015, Archuleta resigned as OPM director.[28]

Daniel Henninger, deputy editorial page director of the Wall Street Journal, speaking on Fox News' Journal Editorial Report, criticized the appointment of Archuleta to be "in charge of one of the most sensitive agencies" in the U.S. government, saying: "What is her experience to run something like that? She was the national political director of Barack Obama's 2012 re-election campaign. She's also the head of something called the Latina Initiative. She's a politico, right? ... That is the kind of person they have put in."[29]

Security experts have stated that the biggest problem with the breach was not the failure to prevent remote break-ins, but the absence of mechanisms to detect outside intrusion and the lack of proper encryption of sensitive data. OPM CIO Donna Seymour countered that criticism by pointed to the agency's aging systems as the primary obstacle to putting such protections in place, despite having encryption tools available. DHS Assistant Secretary for Cybersecurity and Communications Andy Ozment explained further that, "If an adversary has the credentials of a user on the network, then they can access data even if it's encrypted, just as the users on the network have to access data, and that did occur in this case. So encryption in this instance would not have protected this data."[30]

InvestigationEdit

A July 22, 2015 memo by Inspector General Patrick McFarland said that OPM's Chief Information Officer Donna Seymour was slowing her investigation into the breach, leading him to wonder whether or not she was acting in good faith. He did not raise any specific claims of misconduct, but he did say that her office was fostering an "atmosphere of mistrust" by giving him "incorrect or misleading" information.[31] On Monday 22 February 2016, CIO Donna Seymour resigned, just two days before she was scheduled to testify before a House panel that is continuing to investigate the data breach.[32]

ReactionsEdit

FBI Director James Comey stated: "It is a very big deal from a national security perspective and from a counterintelligence perspective. It's a treasure trove of information about everybody who has worked for, tried to work for, or works for the United States government."[33]

Speaking at a forum in Washington, D.C., Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper said: "You have to kind of salute the Chinese for what they did."[34]

President-elect Donald Trump said: "China, relatively recently, hacked 20 million government names. How come nobody even talks about that?"[35]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Barrett, Devlin (5 June 2015). "U.S. Suspects Hackers in China Breached About four (4) Million People's Records, Officials Say". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  2. ^ a b Zengerle, Patricia; Cassella, Megan (2015-07-09). "Estimate of Americans hit by government personnel data hack skyrockets". Reuters. Retrieved 2015-07-09.
  3. Risen, Tom (5 June 2015). "China Suspected in Theft of Federal Employee Records". US News & World Report. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  4. ^ a b Sanders, Sam (4 June 2015). "Massive Data Breach Puts 4 Million Federal Employees' Records At Risk". NPR. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d e Chaffetz, Jason (September 7, 2016). "The OPM Data Breach: How the Government Jeopardized Our National Security for More than a Generation" (PDF). House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
  6. Boyd, Aaron (2017-08-08). "OPM CIO Seymour resigns days before Oversight hearing". Federal Times. Retrieved 2017-12-04.
  7. Correspondent, Evan Perez, CNN Justice. "FBI arrests Chinese national connected to malware used in OPM data breach". CNN. Retrieved 2017-08-28.
  8. ^ a b Sanger, David E. (5 June 2015). "Hacking Linked to China Exposes Millions of U.S. Workers". New York Times. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  9. ^ a b "A product demo revealed the 'biggest ever' government data breach - Fortune". Fortune. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  10. Kim Zetter and Andy Greenberg (11 June 2015). "Why The OPM Breach Is Such a Security and Privacy Debacle". Wired. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  11. "Report: Hack of government employee records discovered by product demo". Ars Technica. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  12. Damian Paletta And Siobhan Hughes (10 June 2015). "U.S. Spy Agencies Join Probe of Personnel-Records Theft". WSJ. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  13. "CyTech Services Confirms Assistance to OPM Breach Response". PRWeb. 15 June 2015. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  14. "Credit for discovering the OPM breach". POLITICO. Retrieved 2016-09-17.
  15. "Surprise! House Oversight report blames OPM leadership for breach of records". Retrieved 2016-09-17.
  16. Mike Levine. "OPM Hack Far Deeper Than Publicly Acknowledged, Went Undetected For More Than A Year, Sources Say".
  17. "Breach of Employee Data Wider Than Initial Report, U.S. Says".
  18. ^ a b Auerbach, David. "The OPM Breach Is a Catastrophe".
  19. ^ a b Ken Dilanian, Union: Hackers have personnel data on every federal employee, Associated Press (June 11, 2015).
  20. Sanger, David E. (2015-09-23). "Hackers Took Fingerprints of 5.6 Million U.S. Workers, Government Says". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2015-09-23.
  21. Paglieri, Jose. "OPM hack's unprecedented haul: 1.1 million fingerprints". Retrieved 11 July 2015.
  22. ^ a b Liptak, Kevin (4 June 2015). "U.S. government hacked; feds think China is the culprit". CNN. Retrieved 5 June 2015.
  23. Gallagher, Sean. "Encryption "would not have helped" at OPM, says DHS official".
  24. David Auerbach, The OPM Breach Is a Catastrophe: First the government must own up to its failure. Then the feds should follow this plan to fix it, Slate (June 16, 2015).
  25. Office of Personnel Management, Office of the Inspector General, Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 2014–March 31, 2015.
  26. Schmidt, Michael S.; Sanger, David E.; Perlroth, Nicole. "Chinese Hackers Pursue Key Data on U.S. Workers". The New York Times. Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  27. Jackson, George. "Archuleta on attempted breach and USIS". Retrieved 29 June 2015.
  28. Davis, Julie H. "Katherine Archuleta, Director of Office of Personnel Management, Resigns". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 July 2015.
  29. Too Much Information: A transcript of the weekend's program on FOX News Channel (July 12, 2015).
  30. Aaron Boyd (22 June 2015). "OPM breach a failure on encryption, detection". Federal Times. Retrieved 17 November 2015.
  31. "Watchdog accuses OPM of hindering hack investigation". Retrieved 8 August 2015.
  32. "OPM's cybersecurity chief resigns in wake of massive data breach". Retrieved 23 February 2016.
  33. "Hacks of OPM databases compromised 22.1 million people, federal authorities say". The Washington Post. July 9, 2015.
  34. "China Is 'Leading Suspect' in Massive Hack of US Government Networks". ABC News. June 25, 2015.
  35. "After Security Meeting, Trump Admits Possibility of Russian Hacking". The New York Times. January 6, 2017.