Tuesday, October 31, 2017

List of trigonometric identities

That other plot – to bring down Trump




Well over a year after the FBI began investigating "collusion" between the Trump campaign and Vladimir Putin, Special Counsel Robert Mueller has brought in his first major indictment.

Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort has been charged with a series of crimes dating back years, though none is tied directly to President Donald Trump or 2016.

With a leak to CNN that indictments were coming, Mueller's office stole the weekend headlines. This blanketed the explosive news on a separate front, as the dots began to be connected on a bipartisan plot to bring down Trump that began two years ago.

And like "Murder of the Orient Express," it seems almost everyone on the train had a hand in the plot.

The narrative begins in October 2015.

Then it was that the Washington Free Beacon, a neocon website, engaged a firm of researchers called Fusion GPS to do deep dirt-diving into Trump's personal and professional life – and take him out.

A spinoff of Bill Kristol's The Weekly Standard, the Beacon is run by his son-in-law. And its Daddy Warbucks is the GOP oligarch and hedge-fund billionaire Paul Singer.

From October 2015 to May 2016, Fusion GPS dug up dirt for the neocons and never-Trumpers. By May, however, Trump had routed all rivals and was the certain Republican nominee.

So the Beacon bailed, and Fusion GPS found two new cash cows to finance its dirt-diving – the DNC and the Clinton campaign.

To keep the sordid business at arm's length, both engaged the party's law firm of Perkins Coie. Paid $12.4 million by the DNC and Clinton campaign, Perkins used part of this cash hoard to pay Fusion GPS.

Here is where it begins to get interesting.

In June 2016, Fusion GPS engaged a British spy, Christopher Steele, who had headed up the Russia desk at MI6, to ferret out any connections between Trump and Russia.

Steele began contacting old acquaintances in the FSB, the Russian intelligence service. And the Russians began to feed him astonishing dirt on Trump that could, if substantiated, kill his candidacy..

Among the allegations was that Trump had consorted with prostitutes at a Moscow hotel, that the Kremlin was blackmailing him, that there was provable collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

In memos from June to October 2016, Steele passed this on to Fusion GPS, which passed it on to major U.S. newspapers. But as the press was unable to verify it, they declined to publish it.

Steele's final product, a 35-page dossier, has been described as full of "unsubstantiated and salacious allegations."

Steele's research, however, had also made its way to James Comey's FBI, which was apparently so taken with it that the bureau considered paying Steele to continue his work.

About this "astonishing" development, columnist Byron York of the Washington Examiner quotes Sen. Chuck Grassley:

"The idea that the FBI and associates of the Clinton campaign would pay Mr. Steele to investigate the Republican nominee for president in the run-up to the election raises … questions about the FBI's independence from politics, as well as the Obama administration's use of law enforcement and intelligence agencies for political ends."

The questions begin to pile up.

What was the FBI's relationship with the British spy who was so wired into Russian intelligence?

Did the FBI use the information Steele dug up to expand its own investigation of Russia-Trump "collusion"? Did the FBI pass what Steele unearthed to the White House and the National Security Council?

Like the reporting you see here? Sign up for free news alerts from WND.com, America's independent news network..

Did the Obama administration use the information from the Steele dossier to justify unmasking the names of Trump officials who had been picked up on legitimate electronic intercepts?

In testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee, Clinton campaign chair John Podesta and DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz claimed they did not know that Perkins Coie had enlisted Fusion GPA or the British spy to dig up dirt on Trump.

Yet, when Podesta testified, the lawyer sitting beside him in the committee room was Marc Elias of Perkins Coie, who had engaged Fusion GPS and received the fruits of Steele's undercover work.

Here one is tempted to cite Bismarck that, if you wish to enjoy politics or sausages, you should not inquire too closely how they are made.

Thus we have Free Beacon neocons, never-Trump Republicans, the Hillary Clinton campaign, the DNC, a British spy and comrades in Russian intelligence, and perhaps the FBI, all working with secret money and seedy individuals to destroy a candidate they could not defeat in a free election.

If future revelations demonstrate that this is what went down, it is not only the White House that has major problems.

If you wish to know why Americans detest politics and hate the "swamp" that has been made of their capital city, follow this story all the way to its inevitable end. It will be months of unfolding.

The real indictment here is of the American political system, and the true tragedy is the decline of the Old Republic.


Catalonia Is Not Alone

The regions desperate for independence.



Lothar



Sun + Low Crime: Make Great America great again? El Paso Texas $ military, law enforcement

Avoid crime in  El Paso Texas
 Zero Income Tax, high and dry.
Sun and clean air, high altitude but not so high as to get too much snow, cold, ice...
The sunniest southernmost highest altitude large city in the USA
10 hours from San Diego Beach (only city between is Tucson) 
easy drive huge fast interstates east, west, or north to Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Denver, Wyoming…

1 hour to 9000 foot camping, houses, mountains around Cloudcroft Ruidoso, and many other high altitude areas.
Very exotic, remote, some paved roads, mostly dirt roads nearly uninhabited and reachable only on foot or horse.
White sands, exotic geological formations, plateaus, etc.
Smokey the bear was found there.
I grew up near there.
Outdoor oriented area.
I really liked it, the bright sun year round, clean air high altitude.
Make $ money in military, 
law enforcement, 
medical VA #1 ranked
Good place for young people who can speak Spanish
Good for those want to avoid MS, stroke, depression, suicide, and other sun deficiency diseases
Good for lung diseases high dry air kill germs, prevent pneumonia, etc.

------------------------------


El Paso has been ranked the safest large city in the U.S. for four consecutive years and has ranked in the top three since 1997.

Medical Center of the Americas, the only medical research and care provider complex in West Texas and southern New Mexico, and the
 University of Texas at El Paso, the city's primary university 

The sun shines 302 days per year on average in El Paso, 83% of daylight hours,
 the city is nicknamed "The Sun City"
Due to its arid, windy climate,
El Paso, at 3,800 ft  elevation, also receives snow; weather systems have produced over one foot of snow on several occasions.   

El Paso has a transitional climate between cold desert climate and hot desert climate 
 with hot summers, usually with little humidity, and mild, dry winters. 
Rainfall averages 9.7 in per year, much of which occurs during the summer from July through September,

On average, there are 52 nights of at- or below-freezing lows, 
109 days of 90 °F  highs and
 20 days of 100 °F highs annually; 
it is extremely rare for temperatures to stay below the freezing mark all day

El Paso has a strong federal and military presence. 
William Beaumont Army Medical Center, 
Biggs Army Airfield, and 
Fort Bliss call the city home. 
Fort Bliss is one of the largest military complexes of the United States Army and the largest training area in the United States.
 Also headquartered in El Paso are the
DEA domestic field division 7, 
El Paso Intelligence Center, 
Joint Task Force North,
 U.S. Border Patrol El Paso Sector, and
 U.S. Border Patrol Special Operations Group (SOG).


population  683,080.
metropolitan area covers all of El Paso and Hudspeth counties in Texas, and has a population of 841,971.
The El Paso metropolitan area forms part of the larger El Paso–Las Cruces CSA, with a population of 1,056,178

 Paso del Norte or El Paso–Juárez–Las Cruces. The region of over 2.7 million people constitutes the largest bilingual and binational work force in the Western Hemisphere.

The El Paso region has had human settlement for thousands of years, as evidenced by Folsom points from hunter-gatherers found at Hueco Tanks.
 The evidence suggests 10,000 to 12,000 years of human habitation.
 The earliest known cultures in the region were maize farmers.

Assaults, robberies turn Great America into real-life scare

SANTA CLARA — Thieves reportedly armed with Tasers assaulted and robbed patrons at California's Great America, turning the amusement park's 10th annual Halloween fest into a real-life fright for thousands of visitors and employees, park security and visitors said.

Santa Clara police estimated that about 100 youth were perpetrating the mayhem, which broke out about 10:30 p.m. Saturday at the Great America Haunt. About 20,000 visitors were in the park, police said.

Police arrested one juvenile on suspicion of theft, Santa Clara Police Lieutenant Dan Moreno said. Visitors reported seeing other perpetrators escape into waiting cars.

Park patrons reported encountering groups of robbers, some armed with Tasers, who ran through crowds stealing mobile phones, purses, and backpacks and sending visitors fleeing for exits. Some panicked visitors tried to scale park fences. About 30 patrons were injured, by one security guard's estimate.

The mother, who does not want to be publicly identified because she was victimized, said she then frantically searched for her daughter amid terrified crowds as people were being assaulted. Her daughter and friend were not physically harmed.

"One lady got punched in the face," she said. "Security did nothing to try to get those guys out."

About 20,000 guests were crowded into the park to wander through mazes, visit "spine-tingling scare zones" and board the Demon roller-coaster.

About four of the city's officers were working privately, on contracted security shifts with the park. When the mayhem broke out, up to about a dozen more Santa Clara officers were called in to assist, Moreno said.

Park spokesman Roger Ross characterized the melee as incidents that were quickly addressed. "The safety of our guests is our top priority," he wrote in an email.

A supervising guard with a firm handling security for the park said what began as groups snatching items escalated 

"to them going around beating up people randomly, even security guards and actors in the mazes."  

The guard, who didn't want his name used because he was not authorized to speak, said that officers from other neighboring jurisdictions also were called in to restore order.

Even so, police and park security were outnumbered, visitors reported.

Ross said the park remained open until its normal 1 a.m. closing time.

But numerous guests reported that the lights dimmed about midnight and people were shepherded out.

That account was confirmed by the security supervisor. He himself reported being taunted and jumped by five assailants. When the guard flipped one to the ground, he said, the others fled.

The San Francisco mother woke up Sunday morning with pain in her arm and wrist.

"I feel so violated. I feel so completely violated," she said. "I was just trying to drop off my daughter, and stick around because I live far away. This was terrible."

Great America planned to operate its Haunt as scheduled Sunday. Its online advertisement reads, "Fear is waiting for you,"

Monday, October 30, 2017

marijuana bust in Nixa

MO going to pot
And worse:
 heroin meth opiods ....
100% addicts in small towns

Http://www.ky3.com/content/news/Police-make-significant-marijuana-bust-in-Nixa-454161503.html

coffee dye clothes

Old coffee may be rancid = unhealthy
Coffee is not healthy
Caffeine theobromine fibrillation stroke aneurism heart attack. 

Goes well with bright blue Jeep stylish. 

Boil clothes in it camo
Nice brown color
Camoflage. 

Https://www.google.com/search?q=coffee+dye&oq=coffee+dye&aqs=chrome..69i57.8527j0j4&client=ms-android-boost-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8

2008 Harley-Davidson... Low miles

$2500
Harley
Suspicious ad in papers here
Nevada too. 
Fake news?
Cheaper than bicycle at Bass pro
I had idea to convert Harley to bicycle uphill race Lake Tahoe
Now can buy fat tire bicycles

Http://classifieds.nevadaappeal.com/ad/Transportation/Motorcycles/2008-harley-davidson/7-0000131675#.Wfd_6UlOnqA

Trump's armada: Navy assembles 3 carriers in Asia for the president’s visit (~ 1/4 of our mighty NAVY)



I cannot believe Obama and other politicians allowed Korea to buy nukes and missiles.
Should have blockaded the country before the nuke program got big.
Now it looks like war or surrender to Korea demands.
War would happen very fast with millions of casualties including our troops.
Maybe by accident.
Millions of people a few miles from DMZ within range of artillery and nukes and everything.

Liberals have destroyed our politics, military, and universities.
I have been thinking a lot while saving my eyes by not using computers so much.
Liberals have been infiltrating everything and doing as much damage as possible.
My generation especially - Vietnam war draft dodgers and hippies.
Vermin sat in plush colleges or offices while others went to war.
Ladder climbers, did nothing but sit there and smoke marijuana.
Now they are in positions of power and great wealth for doing nothing.
Federal Reserve prints money, sells bonds, and gives the $ to liberals.
So now they run everything and aim to destroy USA
become multicultural multisexual drug addicts hippies hepatitis HIV aids…
Their view of paradise
Will collapse and be taken over by Mexicans and black Muslims
Stock market is way over valued P/E near record may collapse this year if Fed reverses Quantitative Easing.
War may be a trigger for big selloff.
Or collapse of the leaning tower of San Francisco in big quake.







The three Navy carriers — accompanied by more than 20,000 sailors, hundreds of aircraft and an array of destroyers and cruisers — will all be underway in the Japan-based 7th Fleet's area of operations.

Lothar


Sunday, October 29, 2017

Disney World Orlando Florida retirement jobs.

Work at University during busy school year

Work at Disney world busy summer season
More fun than casino gamble sin City and
 cooler summer
Much more to do
Beaches. 
Zero income tax
Drudge
Limbaugh
Retirees
Oranges
Mayo clinic
Huge population

Can swap apartments
Opposite seasons. 

Florida much cheaper than Hawaii. 

Shared route
From Magic Kingdom Park to UCF Student Union via I-4 E and FL-408 E.

50 min (40 mi)
50 min in current traffic

1. Head north
2. Turn right
3. Continue straight
4. Slight left toward Floridian Way
5. Merge onto Floridian Way
6. Use the right lane to take the ramp to Epcot/Disney Springs
7. Take the I-4 E ramp to Orlando
8. Keep left at the fork, follow signs for I-4 E/Orlando
9. Merge onto I-4 E
10. Use the middle 2 lanes to stay on I-4 E
11. Keep right to stay on I-4 E
12. Take exit 82A for FL-408 E
13. Keep right at the fork, follow signs for FL-408 E/Titusville
14. Keep left at the fork to stay on FL-408 E
15. Turn right onto Ingenuity Dr
16. Turn left onto Discovery Dr
17. Turn right onto Gemini Blvd E
18. Turn left onto Scorpius St
19. Turn left onto Pegasus Dr
20. Arrive at location: UCF Student Union

For the best route in current traffic visit 

Hawaii Beach Sun Health Medicare Advantage, Supplement F,G

We were having Hawaii weather until a few days ago,
80 degrees hi
77 degrees at 7pm
70 low.
Then suddenly south wind flipped to north wind and temperature dropped to freezing, high 44
Now warming again may go over 70 soon.
Lots of wind and fast changing temperatures this time of year.
South wind is warm
North wind is cold
Makes me want to move south.
I have moved to gymnasium exercise the past year.
Not as healthy or aesthetic as the great outdoors but no:
bird shit,
dogs, bear, coyote,
criminals,
cars, traffic,
bikes, skateboards,
traffic
pollution
Air is filtered and always the right temperature so no coats or special clothing high speed dress
But no sun indoors
Sun needed for skin and eye health, not filtered by glass or smog.

Hawaii is the best weather, food, air, water, upscale festive environment
Internet Humana Medicare website
You can print out fees for any zip code where you might want to live.
Humana or some company usually offers a Medicare Advantage program with
ZERO MONTHLY FEES
you can pay more if you want more but the basic plan is often enough.
Best to avoid doctors if at all possible, learn medicine yourself.
If you get a syndrome then study it in the library and take classes at university.
Avoid drugs or fancy treatments.
Fix it yourself ASAP before it gets too bad

Move near a good university and medical college so you can lock into a good set of doctors
And take classes you need to research health and any medical problems
Medicare Advantage has zero fees but locks you into a set of doctors
Medical Supplement plans F,G,... give you flexibility but cost more
If you can lock into a good plan you don't need the flexibility
If you move to a good location you don't need to travel much.
Hawaii has good weather year round, every day.
Florida has better colleges and hospitals but gets hotter in the summer.
Texas is even hotter but West Texas has altitude and better colleges and hospitals.
Arizona is even hotter but some areas too cold and even better colleges and hospitals.
Best Medical is in Boston, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Saint Louis, UCLA, San Francisco,…
But if you stay healthy in Hawaii you don't need much medical.
All the big cities have good gyms often free included in Medicare Advantage or cheap
Take a class at College usually cheap gym on campus for students.
Always go to gym 7 days per week, weights, walk, run, swim in pool etc.
Hawaii go the gym and the beach every day, eat local organic fruits, vegetables,…
Or live Orlando Florida Disney World 8 months then go to Boston during the hot busy summer season when Boston college town is not so crowded and weather is great.

Saturday, October 28, 2017

: Flight records indicate a covert helicopter rooftop EXFIL may have taken place just minutes after the massacre

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders Exposes The Clinton-Russia Collusion Bombshell As Deep State Trump-Russia Narrative COLLAPSES

1 year after (opioids)


> Heard it on NPR again today.  Despair or Blue collar work-related pain??  NPR et al implied that red states turned to opioids in despair (at rust belt job loss?) but I can’t help but wonder if red (i.e. blue collar) workers aren’t more prone to workplace injury and introduced to painkillers in that way.  Or am I justified noting that blue voters (cubicle geeks) are less prone to workplace injury anyway, other than slipping while lounging at the water cooler? 
>
>  
>
> The despair at Trump’s projected loss caused voters to vote Trump and take opioids? Now that Hillary lost and her TRUE BLUE voters are going to howl in despair on November 8, will they also turn to opioids or will they cringe in their cubicles and update their Social Media??
>
>  
>
> http://www.npr.org/2016/12/17/505965420/study-communities-most-affected-by-opioid-epidemic-also-voted-for-trump
>
>  
>
> https://www.inverse.com/article/23509-trump-election-rural-america-opioid-epidemic-heroin
>
>  
>
> “Polling and statistics can’t confirm that Americans actually afflicted by opioid addictions, among them an estimated 1.9 million prescription medication addicts and 586,000 heroin users, voted overwhelmingly for Trump.”

sun health sulfur beach mountains Arizona Florida Texas Hawaii

Sad to die from sun deficiency as sun is free in Arizona, Texas, Florida, New Mexico, San Diego, …
Dementia prevents clear thinking so people stay stuck in bad places --- learned helplessness.
Smog filters out the good rays and lets bad rays thru such as Fresno inland Los Angeles valleys, etc.

Sad to die from sulfur deficiency, sulfur super cheap, cheaper than salt NaCl?
Buy at Walmart real cheap 10 pound sacks Epsom salt = magnesium sulfate.
Soak my bruised foot from playing basketball stretched plantar fascia connection to toe bones.
Magnesium deficiency another huge problem — I take powdered magnesium citrate along with Vitamin C powder.
Maybe Epsom salt = magnesium sulfate can help on both deficiencies.

Hawaii eat fruit and garlic then sun on skin converts sulfur in garlic and cholesterol into cholesterol sulfate and Vitamin D sulfate.
Cholesterol sulfate is water soluble so flows in blood easily to brain.
Brain has the highest concentration of cholesterol needed for mental health and happiness.
Lots of cheap garlic and fruit in Hawaii.
Liver makes cholesterol out of fructose in fruit so sun + garlic + fruit -> mental health and long life.
Hawaii by far the longest life, best weather, and nearly the highest taxes.
Florida is hotter, Texas really hot, and Arizona, Phoenix Las Vegas the hottest? life threatening near death valley.

Chinese use pure gluten in many recipes for thousands of years.
When I used wheat I got high-gluten pasta, flours.
Gluten is protein --- people need protein.
Gluten may be safer than the carbohydrates in the wheat that will spike your blood sugar and cause grain brain dementia, diabetes, obesity, etc.
But I now avoid wheat, GMO risk, gluten risk, etc.

Molds grow easily on GMO and other grains such as wheat soy wheat oats
Mycotoxins produced by molds survive cooking and destroy your health
CAFO meat pork beef chickens eggs milk dairy contain those mycotoxins too
Another reason to eat fresh fruits and vegetables
Avoid animal products CAFO GMO glyphosate mycotoxins.

Deep State University China Woman Engineer Wu with Monsanto on Resume
says glyphosate may reduce mycotoxins in GMO grain brain dementia products sugar corn soy wheat Oats
and CAFO pork cow chicken products that consume GMO but get eaten by humans before the animals get dementia.
I wonder if her research is biased due to $$$$$$?
http://www.pitt.edu/~few8/Research.htm

Glyphosate Monstanto probable Nazi Jew Missouri company getting rich $$$$
Many Nazis in Missouri and even more in Illinois — Chicago founded by Germans.
Many Nazis are smart good looking blonde females who love learning Arabic and use Muslim boys as sex toys.
Many Jews are actually Nazis who stole identity of Jews after WWII
Why there are so many holocaust victims
True Jews live in Israel not on stolen USA land
True Jews do not participate the 500 year American holocaust against Native Americans

Many Germans, blondes, in Missouri, Illinois,.. midwest, Ivy league, etc.
Hitler would roll over in his grave if he knew how easy it is to take over the world economy without firing a shot
Germans now control almost every technology industry - drugs, banking, seeds, food, cars, transportation, computers, internet, universities, fossil fuels, war machines, medical,…
Sometimes getting very rich $$$$
but ultimately destroy the world kill everybody in ecosystem collapse.
Amazing how much math, science, computers, engineering when I read stuff or meet people often Germans at the core of it.

------------------------------------

Re glyphosate, we continue to get more info so I'm hopeful.
One theory recently was that "gluten allergy" may really be reaction to glyphosate applied to wheat before harvest.
BRICS seem to be offering considerable opposition to increasing glyphosate use.

On sulfur, I've noted a couple of mountains of sulfur in flying around the valley.
One is down at the port of Stockton.
In talking to a refinery guy, I am told that it might be the sulfur they extract from crude in making all the refined products.
I am guessing the sulfur goes to ag and industry for other products.

BB

You need sun to make and distribute Vitamin D3 sulfate properly.

You need sun to make and distribute cholesterol sulfate properly.

Sun is free if you move to select cheap low rent locations in Texas, NM, AZ, FL, HI.

Go to the beach daily.
Run/walk in the sun make needed chemicals improve circulation of blood.

Galveston Texas beach medical college get MD for $99,000 tuition best investment you ever made!

If the beach gets too hot in the summer then go high into the mountains Ruidoso Santa Fe New Mexico
Closer to the sun
Fresh clean air
Less germs
Less molds
Less allergens
Less pollutants
Less humidity stuff growing on walls, cars, furniture ...

Eat organic vegetables.
Avoid toxins, GMO, CAFO etc.
Interesting article:
--------------------------------------

Glyphosate testing has revealed residues of the herbicide in many staple foods, primarily sugar, corn, soy and wheat.

Replacing conventionally grown produce with organic, non-genetically modified foods significantly lessens the likelihood of unintended toxin consumption.

Eating sulfur-rich foods is another important strategy for boosting sulfate production.

sulfur-containing foods include coconut oil, olive oil, organic pastured eggs, legumes, garlic, onions, brussels sprouts, asparagus, kale, broccoli, and wheat germ.

But as with vitamin D, the best way to enhance sulfate synthesis is to get out into the sun..

Easily accessible and entirely free of charge, sunlight is the best and simplest antidote to the problem of sulfate deficiency.

Sulfate: A Common Nutrient Deficiency You're Probably Ignoring

"Sulfate deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency you've never heard of,"

Seneff believes that sulfate deficiency is a major culprit behind most modern chronic diseases and health conditions. But it is one that is largely overlooked.

Sulfate, comprised of the elements sulfur and oxygen is the fourth most abundant anion in our blood.
It exists throughout the body in a variety of forms, filling numerous biological functions.
A critical component of extracellular matrix proteins, it aids in the detoxification of drugs, food additives, and toxic metals.
It also prevents blood from coagulating during transit through capillaries.

Cerebroside sulfate, an integral constituent of the myelin sheaths surrounding neuronal axons in the brain, helps to maintain optimal neurological health.

Like vitamin D--the widely recognized "sunshine vitamin"--sulfate levels depend depend on sun exposure.
It is synthesized from sulfide in the skin and red blood cells via a sunlight-dependent chemical reaction.

Seneff described the skin as "a solar powered battery" that captures energy from sunshine to catalyze sulfate synthesis.

The enzyme Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) "performs the magic" of turning sun energy into sulfate in the skin, she said.

Sunlight & Sulfation

In her research, Seneff identified what she describes as two critical and "mysterious" forms of sulfate:
vitamin D3 sulfate and
cholesterol sulfate.
We simultaneously produce both molecules, which exist in the bloodstream and many other parts of the body, when we're exposed to sunlight.

Vitamin D and cholesterol share a key biochemical connection.

Cholesterol, though potentially harmful in large quantities, must be present for the body to make vitamin D.

Sunlight acts like a bridge between the two nutrients, as ultraviolet B rays from the sun reach the skin and activate 7-hydrocholesterol, a chemical precursor of vitamin D, converting it to vitamin D3.

While many people get their vitamin D3 from nutritional supplements, Seneff pointed to a significant difference between the type our bodies produce naturally and the kind that comes from a bottle.

In the presence of sunlight, skin cells produce vitamin D3 sulfate, a water-soluble form of the typically fat-soluble vitamin D.
The sulfate form can travel freely throughout the bloodstream.
But the vitamin D3 found in oral supplements is an unsulfated form that requires low density lipoprotein (LDL) -- the so-called "bad" cholesterol -- for transport to receptor sites in the body.

It is difficult to obtain the sulfated vitamin D3 from food sources alone, heightening the importance of sun exposure to achieving a healthy vitamin D status (Nair, R. & Maseeh, A. J Pharmacol Pharmacother. 2012; 3(2): 118–126).

Sun exposure is really the key.

In addition to vitamin D, many other vitamins, hormones, and neurotransmitters must be sulfated for transport in the blood.
Sulfate transport ranks among the most important bodily functions these various substances perform.

Mysterious Molecules

Cholesterol sulfate is another mystery molecule that Seneff believes deserves more attention from health practitioners.

Scientists do not yet fully understand the many biological tasks that cholesterol sulfate carries out.
Seneff views this as a problematic oversight, urging that both cholesterol and sulfate are "essential to the wellbeing of all cells."

Red blood cells produce cholesterol sulfate, which collects around the exterior of the cells and creates a negatively charged field around them.
This aids their smooth passage through tiny capillaries.
In essence, the negative charges prevent the cells from getting stuck to each other or to the capillary walls.
Cholesterol sulfate also prevents red blood cells from rupturing, a condition known as hemolysis.

In a paper published in the journal,Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, Seneff and her colleagues theorized that sulfur deficiency contributes to the development of atherosclerosis, and the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other undesirable substances in the artery walls.

Most health experts blame atherosclerosis and CVD on elevated serum LDL, low HDL, and elevated homocysteine.
But Seneff and colleagues offer a different theory, one that identifies deficiencies in critical biosulfates--especially cholesterol sulfate--as a prime cause of heart disease.

She suggests that when the body is deficient in sulfates, cardiovascular plaque develops intentionally as an "alternative mechanism" to make and supply more cholesterol and sulfate to the heart.
When sulfate levels are low, artery walls cannot function properly, triggering cascades that lead to plaque production and buildup.

Elevated cholesterol is commonly treated with lipid-lowering statin drugs.
But Seneff's team says addressing heart disease with medications that lower cholesterol is problematic, because "the cholesterol is desperately needed to maintain blood stability."

"Endothelial cells, macrophages, and platelets collaborate to produce [cholesterol sulfate] from homocysteine and oxidized LDL," she wrote in a 2015 paper.
Formation of atherosclerotic plaque is, in her view, the body's elegant way of providing itself with "a well-choreographed program for renewal of cholesterol sulfate"
in conditions where insufficient dietary sulfur and inadequate sun exposure contribute to low cholesterol sulfate levels,(Seneff, S. et al. Theor Biol Med Model. 2015; 12(1): 9).

Seneff believes there is a link between sulfate deficiency and numerous other health conditions including autism, eczema, asthma, anemia, preeclampsia, premature birth, and digestive disorders (Seneff, S. et al. Entropy. 2012: 14(11): 2265-2290).

Her publications linking incidence of autism with exposure to the herbicide glyphosate, triggered considerable outcry from some toxicologists and medical thought leaders who argued that Seneff was playing loose and fast with epidemiological data and that her claims do not stand up to scrutiny.

For her part, Seneff has not tempered her views on the dangers of glyphosate.

Toxins Disrupt Sulfate Synthesis

Her more recent work on sulfates makes a compelling case for increasing sun exposure, and perhaps increasing dietary sulfate intake.
A number of environmental and lifestyle factors make this a challenging goal to achieve.

Countless toxic chemicals in the environment -- and glyphosate is one of them -- can disrupt sulfate synthesis and sulfate transport, leading to sulfate deficiency.

In the last two decades, the use of glyphosate as an agricultural product has skyrocketed in the US and worldwide.
Known as the main ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkillers, glyphosate was in the spotlight two years ago when the World Health Organization defined it as a "probable human carcinogen."
Last year, the WHO revised its position and downplayed the potential risk.

But many scientists--and certainly many members of the general public--view it as a pervasive poison in our food system that increases the risk of cancer, autism, heart failure, dementia, and joint pain.

According to Seneff, the herbicide's deleterious impacts on human health can be traced to its effects on sulfate synthesis.

"Glyphosate is a trainwreck for sulfate," she said.
It not only disturbs sulfate production, transport, and delivery, but causes loss of sulfate through the kidneys and urine as well.
The toxin can also disrupt intestinal bacteria, triggering gut dysbiosis and leaky gut syndrome.

Furthermore, it suppress the activities of members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes (Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. Entropy. 2013; 15(4): 1416-1463).

Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which Seneff believes is largely responsible for catalyzing sulfate production in the body, is a CYP enzyme that is highly susceptible to damage from glyphosate and other environmental toxicants including mercury and aluminum (Seneff, S. et al. Entropy. 2012; 14(12): 2492-2530).
Arsenic, cadmium, and lead also disrupt CYP enzymes (see Death & Toxins: Confronting the Main Driver of Chronic Disease).

Glyphosate can cause eNOS to malfunction, interrupting production of both sulfate and nitric oxide (NO), leading to excessive haemolysis (anaemia), vascular constriction and hypertension (Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. J Biol Phys Chem. 2016; 16(1): 9–46).

Seneff further argues that the overuse of sunscreen disrupts eNOS as well.
In addition to preventing sunlight from catalyzing central chemical processes like vitamin D sulfation, high-SPF sunscreens contain aluminum, which disrupts eNOS.

Boosting Sulfur Intake

To prevent sulfate deficiency, Seneff recommends avoiding exposure to glyphosate and other toxins that impair sulfate synthesis.

Glyphosate testing has revealed residues of the herbicide in many staple foods, primarily sugar, corn, soy and wheat.

Replacing conventionally grown produce with organic, non-genetically modified foods significantly lessens the likelihood of unintended toxin consumption.

Eating sulfur-rich foods is another important strategy for boosting sulfate production.
Animal protein is a significant source of dietary sulfur.

Other sulfur-containing foods include coconut oil, olive oil, organic pastured eggs, legumes, garlic, onions, brussels sprouts, asparagus, kale, broccoli, and wheat germ.

But as with vitamin D, the best way to enhance sulfate synthesis is to get out into the sun….

Easily accessible and entirely free of charge, sunlight is the best and simplest antidote to the problem of sulfate deficiency.

Friday, October 27, 2017

VAMC medical care ranking

Be alive in Los Angeles
Not dead in Alaska

many other good VA hospitals
Boston and UCLA are great as I would expect
Some other locations not sure why they are so good

Honolulu, Fresno are ok but not the best
Wide range.  VA forced to give up their numbers

Vegas Bombshell: Video Shows 17 Ambulances Pulling Bodies Out Of Hooters » Alex Jones' Infowars


'Egg-traordinary' facility to process pasture-raised eggs opens in Springfield

High quality surplus eggs
60 for $2.22
Cheap!
Gas prices jumped today
I got 2.13 yesterday

Cows and chickens all over this region
Water and good weather and grasslands. 
Not much glyphosate GMO or huge industrial corn soy wheat farms. Soil too Rocky. Good. For cows. 
Milk tastes great. 


Https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.news-leader.com/amp/775653001

Tuesday, October 24, 2017

'Egg-traordinary' facility to process pasture-raised eggs opens in Springfield

Spr

Scientists reveal the relationship between sugar, cancer

Sugar danger enemy #1
Not just cancer but most modern diseases. 

Avoid sugar and anything with sweet taste. 

Alcohol is a form of sugar waste from yeast. 

Flour carbos rapidly convert to sugars spike insulin. 

Https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171013103623.htm

Sioux chef health food traditions for health High Dry Dakota

Move to the homeland of your ancestors. Eat the wild food they ate. Your genes evolved to match that diet.

Some native Americans are getting fed up with modern junk food and are learning their traditional foods to regain health.

http://sioux-chef.com/about/

Monday, October 23, 2017

8000 feet Summerhaven, Arizona

30 miles to Tucson warm winter

Ski southernmost in USA 8000 feet + cool summers

Very close

Scenic state. 
Close to San Diego beach medical colleges

Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summerhaven%2C_Arizona?wprov=sfla1

Beach to medical center Texas

Warm southern beach
Galveston medical college
1 hour to world's largest medical center. And more medical colleges
4th largest city Houston
0 income tax state Texas
Affordable. 
Huge state little snow. 
Farther south than San Diego or UCLA
Much less crowded. 
Beaches both sides of very long island. 

Shared route
From Texas Medical Center to Galveston via I-45 S.

1 hr 1 min (52 mi)
1 hr 8 min in current traffic


1. Head northwest on Moursund St toward Bertner Ave
2. Turn left onto Bertner Ave
3. Turn left onto Holcombe Blvd
4. Turn right onto Service Rd
5. Continue straight to stay on Service Rd
6. Use the left lane to take the TX-288 S ramp
7. Merge onto State Hwy 288 S/TX-288 S
8. Use the middle 2 lanes to take the Interstate 610 E exit
9. Keep left at the fork, follow signs for Interstate 610 E
10. Take exit 32A for I-45 S toward Galveston
11. Keep left to stay on I-45 S
12. Keep left at the fork to stay on I-45 S
13. Continue onto Broadway Avenue J
14. Turn left onto 27th St
15. Arrive at location: Galveston

For the best route in current traffic visit https://goo.gl/maps/5S3Cn6WRgaB2

Beach to medical center

Shared route
From Texas Medical Center to Galveston via I-45 S.

1 hr 1 min (52 mi)
1 hr 8 min in current traffic


1. Head northwest on Moursund St toward Bertner Ave
2. Turn left onto Bertner Ave
3. Turn left onto Holcombe Blvd
4. Turn right onto Service Rd
5. Continue straight to stay on Service Rd
6. Use the left lane to take the TX-288 S ramp
7. Merge onto State Hwy 288 S/TX-288 S
8. Use the middle 2 lanes to take the Interstate 610 E exit
9. Keep left at the fork, follow signs for Interstate 610 E
10. Take exit 32A for I-45 S toward Galveston
11. Keep left to stay on I-45 S
12. Keep left at the fork to stay on I-45 S
13. Continue onto Broadway Avenue J
14. Turn left onto 27th St
15. Arrive at location: Galveston

For the best route in current traffic visit https://goo.gl/maps/5S3Cn6WRgaB2

sun health sulfur beach mountains Texas

You need sun to make and distribute Vitamin D3 sulfate properly.

You need sun to make and distribute cholesterol sulfate properly.

Sun is free if you move to select cheap low rent locations in Texas, NM, AZ, FL, HI.

Go to the beach daily.
Run/walk in the sun make needed chemicals improve circulation of blood.

Galveston Texas beach medical college get MD for $99,000 tuition best investment you ever made!

If the beach gets too hot in the summer then go high into the mountains Ruidoso Santa Fe New Mexico
Closer to the sun
Fresh clean air
Less germs
Less molds
Less allergens
Less pollutants
Less humidity stuff growing on walls, cars, furniture ...

Eat organic vegetables.
Avoid toxins, GMO, CAFO etc.
Interesting article:
--------------------------------------

Glyphosate testing has revealed residues of the herbicide in many staple foods, primarily sugar, corn, soy and wheat.

Replacing conventionally grown produce with organic, non-genetically modified foods significantly lessens the likelihood of unintended toxin consumption.

Eating sulfur-rich foods is another important strategy for boosting sulfate production.

sulfur-containing foods include coconut oil, olive oil, organic pastured eggs, legumes, garlic, onions, brussels sprouts, asparagus, kale, broccoli, and wheat germ.

But as with vitamin D, the best way to enhance sulfate synthesis is to get out into the sun..

Easily accessible and entirely free of charge, sunlight is the best and simplest antidote to the problem of sulfate deficiency.

Sulfate: A Common Nutrient Deficiency You're Probably Ignoring

"Sulfate deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency you've never heard of,"

Seneff believes that sulfate deficiency is a major culprit behind most modern chronic diseases and health conditions. But it is one that is largely overlooked.

Sulfate, comprised of the elements sulfur and oxygen is the fourth most abundant anion in our blood. It exists throughout the body in a variety of forms, filling numerous biological functions. A critical component of extracellular matrix proteins, it aids in the detoxification of drugs, food additives, and toxic metals. It also prevents blood from coagulating during transit through capillaries.

Cerebroside sulfate, an integral constituent of the myelin sheaths surrounding neuronal axons in the brain, helps to maintain optimal neurological health.

Like vitamin D--the widely recognized "sunshine vitamin"--sulfate levels depend depend on sun exposure. It is synthesized from sulfide in the skin and red blood cells via a sunlight-dependent chemical reaction.

Seneff described the skin as "a solar powered battery" that captures energy from sunshine to catalyze sulfate synthesis.

The enzyme Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase (eNOS) "performs the magic" of turning sun energy into sulfate in the skin, she said.

Sunlight & Sulfation

In her research, Seneff identified what she describes as two critical and "mysterious" forms of sulfate: vitamin D3 sulfate and cholesterol sulfate. We simultaneously produce both molecules, which exist in the bloodstream and many other parts of the body, when we're exposed to sunlight.

Vitamin D and cholesterol share a key biochemical connection.

Cholesterol, though potentially harmful in large quantities, must be present for the body to make vitamin D.

Sunlight acts like a bridge between the two nutrients, as ultraviolet B rays from the sun reach the skin and activate 7-hydrocholesterol, a chemical precursor of vitamin D, converting it to vitamin D3.

While many people get their vitamin D3 from nutritional supplements, Seneff pointed to a significant difference between the type our bodies produce naturally and the kind that comes from a bottle.

In the presence of sunlight, skin cells produce vitamin D3 sulfate, a water-soluble form of the typically fat-soluble vitamin D. The sulfate form can travel freely throughout the bloodstream. But the vitamin D3 found in oral supplements is an unsulfated form that requires low density lipoprotein (LDL) -- the so-called "bad" cholesterol -- for transport to receptor sites in the body.

It is difficult to obtain the sulfated vitamin D3 from food sources alone, heightening the importance of sun exposure to achieving a healthy vitamin D status (Nair, R. & Maseeh, A. J Pharmacol Pharmacother. 2012; 3(2): 118–126).

Sun exposure is really the key.

In addition to vitamin D, many other vitamins, hormones, and neurotransmitters must be sulfated for transport in the blood. Sulfate transport ranks among the most important bodily functions these various substances perform.

Mysterious Molecules

Cholesterol sulfate is another mystery molecule that Seneff believes deserves more attention from health practitioners.

Scientists do not yet fully understand the many biological tasks that cholesterol sulfate carries out. Seneff views this as a problematic oversight, urging that both cholesterol and sulfate are "essential to the wellbeing of all cells."

Red blood cells produce cholesterol sulfate, which collects around the exterior of the cells and creates a negatively charged field around them. This aids their smooth passage through tiny capillaries. In essence, the negative charges prevent the cells from getting stuck to each other or to the capillary walls. Cholesterol sulfate also prevents red blood cells from rupturing, a condition known as hemolysis.

In a paper published in the journal,Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling, Seneff and her colleagues theorized that sulfur deficiency contributes to the development of atherosclerosis, and the buildup of fats, cholesterol, and other undesirable substances in the artery walls.

Most health experts blame atherosclerosis and CVD on elevated serum LDL, low HDL, and elevated homocysteine. But Seneff and colleagues offer a different theory, one that identifies deficiencies in critical biosulfates--especially cholesterol sulfate--as a prime cause of heart disease.

She suggests that when the body is deficient in sulfates, cardiovascular plaque develops intentionally as an "alternative mechanism" to make and supply more cholesterol and sulfate to the heart. When sulfate levels are low, artery walls cannot function properly, triggering cascades that lead to plaque production and buildup.

Elevated cholesterol is commonly treated with lipid-lowering statin drugs. But Seneff's team says addressing heart disease with medications that lower cholesterol is problematic, because "the cholesterol is desperately needed to maintain blood stability."

"Endothelial cells, macrophages, and platelets collaborate to produce [cholesterol sulfate] from homocysteine and oxidized LDL," she wrote in a 2015 paper. Formation of atherosclerotic plaque is, in her view, the body's elegant way of providing itself with "a well-choreographed program for renewal of cholesterol sulfate" in conditions where insufficient dietary sulfur and inadequate sun exposure contribute to low cholesterol sulfate levels,(Seneff, S. et al. Theor Biol Med Model. 2015; 12(1): 9).

Seneff believes there is a link between sulfate deficiency and numerous other health conditions including autism, eczema, asthma, anemia, preeclampsia, premature birth, and digestive disorders (Seneff, S. et al. Entropy. 2012: 14(11): 2265-2290).

If her hypothesis seems like a radical departure from conventional views, that should not be surprising. Seneff is no stranger to scientific controversy.

An electrical engineer and computer scientist by training, she generated considerable consternation from some sectors of the medical world when she jumped the interdisciplinary fences and started publishing research on environmental health issues roughly a decade ago.

Her publications linking incidence of autism with exposure to the herbicide glyphosate, triggered considerable outcry from some toxicologists and medical thought leaders who argued that Seneff was playing loose and fast with epidemiological data and that her claims do not stand up to scrutiny.

For her part, Seneff has not tempered her views on the dangers of glyphosate.

Toxins Disrupt Sulfate Synthesis

Her more recent work on sulfates makes a compelling case for increasing sun exposure, and perhaps increasing dietary sulfate intake. A number of environmental and lifestyle factors make this a challenging goal to achieve.

Countless toxic chemicals in the environment -- and glyphosate is one of them -- can disrupt sulfate synthesis and sulfate transport, leading to sulfate deficiency.

In the last two decades, the use of glyphosate as an agricultural product has skyrocketed in the US and worldwide. Known as the main ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup weedkillers, glyphosate was in the spotlight two years ago when the World Health Organization defined it as a "probable human carcinogen." Last year, the WHO revised its position and downplayed the potential risk.

But many scientists--and certainly many members of the general public--view it as a pervasive poison in our food system that increases the risk of cancer, autism, heart failure, dementia, and joint pain.

According to Seneff, the herbicide's deleterious impacts on human health can be traced to its effects on sulfate synthesis.

"Glyphosate is a trainwreck for sulfate," she said. It not only disturbs sulfate production, transport, and delivery, but causes loss of sulfate through the kidneys and urine as well. The toxin can also disrupt intestinal bacteria, triggering gut dysbiosis and leaky gut syndrome.

Furthermore, it suppress the activities of members of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family of enzymes (Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. Entropy. 2013; 15(4): 1416-1463).

Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which Seneff believes is largely responsible for catalyzing sulfate production in the body, is a CYP enzyme that is highly susceptible to damage from glyphosate and other environmental toxicants including mercury and aluminum (Seneff, S. et al. Entropy. 2012; 14(12): 2492-2530). Arsenic, cadmium, and lead also disrupt CYP enzymes (see Death & Toxins: Confronting the Main Driver of Chronic Disease).

Glyphosate can cause eNOS to malfunction, interrupting production of both sulfate and nitric oxide (NO), leading to excessive haemolysis (anaemia), vascular constriction and hypertension (Samsel, A. & Seneff, S. J Biol Phys Chem. 2016; 16(1): 9–46).

Seneff further argues that the overuse of sunscreen disrupts eNOS as well. In addition to preventing sunlight from catalyzing central chemical processes like vitamin D sulfation, high-SPF sunscreens contain aluminum, which disrupts eNOS.

Boosting Sulfur Intake

To prevent sulfate deficiency, Seneff recommends avoiding exposure to glyphosate and other toxins that impair sulfate synthesis.

Glyphosate testing has revealed residues of the herbicide in many staple foods, primarily sugar, corn, soy and wheat.

Replacing conventionally grown produce with organic, non-genetically modified foods significantly lessens the likelihood of unintended toxin consumption.

Eating sulfur-rich foods is another important strategy for boosting sulfate production. Animal protein is a significant source of dietary sulfur.

Other sulfur-containing foods include coconut oil, olive oil, organic pastured eggs, legumes, garlic, onions, brussels sprouts, asparagus, kale, broccoli, and wheat germ.

But as with vitamin D, the best way to enhance sulfate synthesis is to get out into the sun….

Easily accessible and entirely free of charge, sunlight is the best and simplest antidote to the problem of sulfate deficiency.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

brain health diet - avoid Alzheimers dementia 2

Diet kills people.
Lack of exercise kills people
Indoor and outdoor pollution, toxins, electronics, molds, germs, lack of sun, ....
Avoid fake news on shootings, fires, hurricanes, crime,.....
Focus on what you can control and endangers you the most - diet, location, and exercise.

Avoid sugar, flour, potatoes, all starchy foods.
Running burns off carbo calories so leaves fat for brain as in a ketogenic diet.
Large quantities of vegetables kale broccoli collards cauliflower etc are low in carbos so forces you to burn your own fat ketogenic.
Anybody with excess fat on body should eat more non-starchy vegetables.
Brain and body can burn fat just fine.
I feel better on ketogenic diet and can think better and am more relaxed than yo-yo carbo insulin cycling.

Brain in particular can burn fat especially in older people and dementia patients when carbos will not work for brain as well.
More vegetables and less starch is the key.
This confused article is saying so (overly massaged by journalist):
=========================

LONDON – A 3-month diet comprised of 70% fat improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease patients better than any anti-amyloid drug that has ever been tested.

In a small pilot study, Alzheimer's patients who followed the University of Kansas's ketogenic diet program improved an average of 4 points on one of the most important cognitive assessments in dementia care, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive domain (ADAS-cog). Not only was this gain statistically significant, but it reached a level that clinical trialists believe to be clinically meaningful, and it was similar to the gains that won Food and Drug Administration approval for donepezil in 1996, according to Russell Swerdlow, MD, director of the University of Kansas Alzheimer's Disease Center in Fairway.

"This is the most robust improvement in the ADAS-cog scale that I am aware of for an Alzheimer's interventional trial," said Dr. Swerdlow, who presented the study at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. "In some studies, patients decline along the lines of 5 points or so per year on this measure, so an improvement of 4 points is quite something." 4-point spread between the active and placebo arm over 3 months, said Dr. Swerdlow, who is also the Gene and Marge Sweeney Professor of Neurology at the university. Part of this difference was driven by a 2-point decline in the placebo group. Relative to its baseline, the treatment group improved, on average, by about 2 points.

But in the Ketogenic Diet Retention and Feasibility Trail (KDRAFT), also 3 months long, patients' ADAS-cog scores didn't decline at all.

Everyone who stayed with the diet and kept on their baseline medications improved, although to varying degrees.

KDRAFT was very small, with just 10 patients completing the intervention, and lacked a comparator group, so the results should be interpreted extremely cautiously, Dr. Swerdlow said in an interview. "We have to very careful about overinterpreting these findings. It's a pilot study, and a small group, so we don't know how genuine the finding is. But if it is true, it's a big deal."

Emerging evidence suggests that modifying diet can help prevent Alzheimer's and may even help AD patients think and function better. But this research has largely focused on the heart-healthy diets already proven
You may increase your cholesterol intake through diet, but you're not synthesizing it in your body, and that synthesis is what really drives your cholesterol level. If you're not overeating, your body's production goes down."

Dr. Swerdlow isn't the only clinician researcher looking at how a ketogenic diet might influence cognition. Suzanne Craft, PhD, well known for her investigations of the role of insulin signaling and therapy in AD, is running a ketogenic diet trial as well.

9/7/2017 Fueling the Alzheimer's brain with fat | Internal Medicine News

http://www.mdedge.com/internalmedicinenews/article/145220/alzheimers-cognition/fueling-alzheimers-brain-fat 10/12

brain health diet - avoid Alzheimers dementia

Diet kills people.
Lack of exercise kills people
Indoor and outdoor pollution, toxins, electronics, molds, germs, lack of sun, ....
Avoid fake news on shootings, fires, hurricanes, crime,.....
Focus on what you can control and endangers you the most - diet, location, and exercise.

Avoid sugar, flour, potatoes, all starchy foods.
Running burns off carbo calories so leaves fat for brain as in a ketogenic diet so if you eat carbos then run or swim all day.

Large quantities of vegetables kale broccoli collards cauliflower etc are low in carbos so forces you to burn your own fat ketogenic.
Anybody with excess fat on body should eat more non-starchy vegetables until body is skinny.

Brain and body can burn fat just fine.
I feel better on ketogenic diet and can think better and am more relaxed than yo-yo carbo insulin cycling. 

Brain in particular can burn fat especially in older people and dementia patients when carbos will not work for well for brain.
More vegetables and less starch is the key.
This confused article is saying so (overly massaged by journalist):
=========================

LONDON – A 3-month diet comprised of 70% fat improved cognition in Alzheimer's disease patients better than any anti-amyloid drug that has ever been tested.

In a small pilot study, Alzheimer's patients who followed the University of Kansas's ketogenic diet program improved an average of 4 points on one of the most important cognitive assessments in dementia care, the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale–cognitive domain (ADAS-cog). Not only was this gain statistically significant, but it reached a level that clinical trialists believe to be clinically meaningful, and it was similar to the gains that won Food and Drug Administration approval for donepezil in 1996, according to Russell Swerdlow, MD, director of the University of Kansas Alzheimer's Disease Center in Fairway.

"This is the most robust improvement in the ADAS-cog scale that I am aware of for an Alzheimer's interventional trial," said Dr. Swerdlow, who presented the study at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. "In some studies, patients decline along the lines of 5 points or so per year on this measure, so an improvement of 4 points is quite something." 4-point spread between the active and placebo arm over 3 months, said Dr. Swerdlow, who is also the Gene and Marge Sweeney Professor of Neurology at the university. Part of this difference was driven by a 2-point decline in the placebo group. Relative to its baseline, the treatment group improved, on average, by about 2 points.

But in the Ketogenic Diet Retention and Feasibility Trail (KDRAFT), also 3 months long, patients' ADAS-cog scores didn't decline at all. 

Everyone who stayed with the diet and kept on their baseline medications improved, although to varying degrees.

KDRAFT was very small, with just 10 patients completing the intervention, and lacked a comparator group, so the results should be interpreted extremely cautiously, Dr. Swerdlow said in an interview. "We have to very careful about overinterpreting these findings. It's a pilot study, and a small group, so we don't know how genuine the finding is. But if it is true, it's a big deal."

Emerging evidence suggests that modifying diet can help prevent Alzheimer's and may even help AD patients think and function better. But this research has largely focused on the heart-healthy diets already proven successful in preventing and treating hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Most notably, the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND) diet cut the risk of AD by up to 53% (Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Sep;11[9]:1007-14) and also slowed aging-related cognitive decline (Alzheimers Dement. 2015 Sep; 11[9]:1015-22).

MIND is a combination of the low-salt, plant-focused DASH diet, and the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet. It is a moderate-fat plan, with a ratio of 33% fat, 38% carbohydrates, and 26% protein. Ideally, only 3% of the fat should be saturated, so MIND draws on olive oil, nuts, and other foods with monounsaturated fats, largely eschewing animal fats. It's generally considered fairly easy to follow, since it allows a wide variety of whole grains, beans, nuts, fruits, vegetables, salads, fish, and poultry. Butter, red meat, fried foods, full-fat dairy, and fast foods are strict no-nos.

A ketogenic diet, however, turns MIND on its head. With a 70% fat, 20% protein, 10% carbohydrate ratio, a typical ketogenic diet nearly eliminates most fruits, and virtually all starchy vegetables, beans, and grains. It does, however, incorporate a large amount of fat from many sources, including olive oil, butter, cream, eggs, nuts, all kinds of meat, and fish. For a ketogenic diet, Dr. Swerdlow said, the ratio of fat to protein and carbs is more critical than the source of the fat.

MIND was designed to prevent the cardiovascular and endocrine disorders than predispose to dementia over the long term. But a ketogenic diet for patients with Alzheimer's acutely manipulates the brain's energy metabolism system, forcing it to use ketone bodies instead of glucose for fuel.

In normal energy metabolism, carbohydrates provide a ready supply of glucose, the brain's primary fuel. When carbs are limited or absent, serum insulin decreases and glucagon increases. This promotes lipolysis. Ketones (primarily beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) are formed in the liver from the newly released fatty acids, and released into the circulation, including into the brain during times of decreased glucose availability – a state characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.

Inducing ketosis through diet seems to help correct the normal, age-related decline in the brain's ability to use glucose, said Stephen Cunnane, PhD, who also presented ketogenic intervention results at AAIC. "Cognitively normal, healthy older adults experience a 10% reduction in the brain's ability to metabolize glucose compared to healthy young people," he said in an interview. But this decline accelerates as Alzheimer's hits. Those with early AD have a 20% decrement in glucose utilization, compared with healthy elders.

What's more, Dr. Cunnane said, these decrements are region-specific. Deficits in glucose metabolism hit the thalamus, and temporal and parietal cortices – all pathologically important in AD – particularly hard. The brain glucose deficit isn't unique to the elderly, or even to patients with AD – it also occurs in those who have a family history of the disease, who carry the APOE4 allele, those with presenilin-1 mutations, and those with insulin resistance and diabetes.

Changes in brain glucose metabolism can develop years before any cognitive symptoms manifest and seem to increase the risk of Alzheimer's, said Dr. Cunnane of Sherbrooke University, Quebec

"We propose that this vicious cycle of presymptomatic glucose hypometabolism causes chronic brain energy deprivation, and might contribute to deteriorating neuronal function. That could cause a further decrease in the demand for glucose, leading to cognitive decline."

"What doesn't change, though, is the brain's ability to take up ketone bodies," he said. If anything, the brain appears to use ketones more efficiently as AD becomes established. 

"It's almost like the brain is trying to rescue itself. If those cells were dead, they would not be able to take up ketones. Because they do, we think they are instead starving because of their inability to use glucose and that maybe we can rescue them with ketones before they die.

At AAIC, Dr. Cunnane reported interim results of an investigation of induced ketogenesis in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The 6-month BENEFIC trial comprises 50 patients, randomized to either a daily nutritional supplement with 30 g medium chain triglycerides (MCT) in a unflavored, nondairy emulsion, or a fat-equivalent placebo drink. When consumed, the liver very quickly converts MCT fatty acids into ketone bodies, which then circulate throughout the body, including passing the blood-brain barrier.
All of the participants in the BENEFIC trial underwent brain PET scanning for both glucose and ketone uptake. Early results clearly showed that the MCI brains took up just as much acetoacetate as did the brains of cognitively normal young adults. And although the study wasn't powered for a full cognitive assessment, Dr. Cunnane did present 6-month data on three measures in the MCI group: trail making time, verbal fluency, and the Boston Naming Test. In the active group on MCT, scores on all three measures improved "modestly" in direct correlation with brain ketone uptake. In the placebo group, scores remained unchanged.

"We don't have enough people in the study to make any definitive statement about cognition, but it's nice to see the trend going in the right direction, Dr. Cunnane said. "I really think of this as a dose-finding study and a chance to demonstrate the safety and tolerability of a liquid MCT supplement in people with MCI. Our next study will use a 45 g per day supplement of MCT."

The BENEFIC study looked only at the effects of an MCT supplement, which may not deliver all the metabolic benefits of a ketogenic diet. KDRAFT, however, employed both, and assessed not only cognitive outcomes and adverse effects, but the practical matter of whether AD patients and their caregivers could implement the diet and stick to it.

Couples recruited into the trial met with a dietitian who explained the importance of sticking with the strict fat:carb:protein ratio. It's not easy to stay in that zone, Dr. Swerdlow said, and the MCT supplement really helps there.

"Adding the MCT, which is typically done for the ketogenic diet in epilepsy, increases the fat intake so you can tolerate a bit more carbohydrate and still remain in ketosis. MCT therefore makes it easier to successfully do the diet, if we define success by time in ketosis. Ultimately, it is an iterative diet. You check your urine, and if you are in ketosis, you are doing well. If you are not in ketosis, you have to increase your fat intake, decrease your carb intake, or both."

The study comprised 15 patients (7 with very mild AD, 4 with mild, and 4 with moderate disease). All patients were instructed to remain on their current medications for Alzheimer's disease for the duration of the study if they were taking any. All of the patients with moderate AD and one with very mild AD dropped out of the study within the first month, citing caregiver burden. The supplement was in the form of an oil, not an emulsion like the BENEFIC supplement, and it caused diarrhea and nausea in five subjects, although none discontinued because of that.

"We found that a slow titration of the oil could deal with the GI issues. Rather, the primary deal-breaker seemed to be the stress of planning the menus and preparing the meals."

 One patient discontinued his cholinesterase inhibitor during the study, for unknown reasons. His cognitive scores declined, but was still included in the diet-compliant analysis.

The diet didn't affect weight, blood pressure, insulin sensitivity or resistance, or glucose level, but the intervention was short-lived. Nor were there any significant changes in high-density, low-density, or total cholesterol. Liver enzymes were stable, too.

"The only thing that changed was that they really did increase their fat and decrease their carb intake," Dr. Swerdlow said. 

Daily fat jumped from 91 g to 167 g, and carbs dropped from 201 g to 46 g.

Almost everyone who stuck with the diet achieved and maintained ketosis during the study, although with varying degrees of success. "Many only had a trace amount of urinary ketones," 

The investigators tracked serum beta hydroxybutyrate levels every month as well, and those measures also confirmed ketosis in the group as a whole, although some patients fluctuated in and out of the state.

The cognitive changes were striking, he said. 

In the 10-patient analysis, ADAS-cog scores improved by an average of 4.1 points. 

The results were better when Dr. Swerdlow excluded the patient who stopped his cholinesterase inhibitor medication. 

In that nine-patient group, the ADAS-cog improved an average of 5.3 points.

While urging caution over the small sample size and lack of a control comparator, Dr. Swerdlow expressed deep satisfaction over the outcomes. A clinician as well as a researcher, he is accustomed to the slow but inexorable decline of AD patients.

"I'm going to try to relate the impression you get in the clinic with these scores," he said. "Very rarely, but sometimes, with a cholinesterase inhibitor in patients, we'll see something like a 7-point change. That's a fantastic response, an improvement you can see across the room. A change of 2 points really doesn't look that much different, although caregivers will tell you there is a subtle change, maybe a little more focus. The average we got in our 10 subjects was a 4-point improvement. That's impressive. 

And a 5-point change is like rolling the clock back by a year."

The improvements didn't last, though. A 1-month washout period followed the intervention. By the end, both ADAS-cog and Mini- Mental State Examination scores had returned to their baseline levels. At the end of the study, a few of the patients and their partners expressed their intent to resume the diet, but the investigators do not know whether this indeed happened. Still, the results are encouraging enough that, like Dr. Cunnane, Dr. Swerdlow hopes to conduct a larger, longer study – one that would include a control group.

Future investigations of the ketogenic diet in AD might do well to also include an 

exercise component, both researchers mentioned. 

In addition to starvation, ketogenic dieting, and MCT supplementation, 

exercise is an effective way to induce ketogenesis.

"Exercise produces ketones, but most importantly, it increases the capacity of the brain to use ketones," Dr. Cunnane said. The connection may help explain some of the 

cognitive benefits seen in exercise trials in patients with MCI and AD.

"This raises the possibility that if in fact exercise benefits the brain, ketone bodies may mediate some of that effect," Dr. Swerdlow said. 

"Could exercise potentiate the ketosis from the diet? That is possible, and maybe using these interventions in conjunction would be synergistic. At this point, we are just happy to show the diet is feasible, if even for a limited period."

The KDRAFT study diet is surprisingly flexible despite its strict ratio of fat to protein and carbohydrate, according to the University of Kansas research team that implemented it. It only took a few counseling sessions to get most study participants enthusiastically embracing the new eating plan, even one so radically different from the way they were accustomed to eating.

 "We focused mainly on the macronutrient makeup," said Matthew Taylor, PhD, who supervised the diet study on a day-to-day basis. Instead of distributing a rigid diet plan, with prespecified meals and snacks, "We talked more in general about foods they could have and foods they couldn't have."

"When people think 'ketogenic,' they think bacon, eggs, oil, butter and cream, and may have an automatic negative connotation that this is unhealthy eating," Dr. Taylor said in an interview. 

"But yes, eggs were in there and, because a lot of people really like bacon, there was bacon, too!"

The educational sessions did include teaching about healthy and unhealthy fats, and Dr. Taylor "tried to steer people toward the healthier ones, like olive oil, avocados, and nuts. But I didn't say, 'Eat this one and not that one.' If it took melting butter on vegetables to get to that fat ratio, I was not as concerned about where the fat came from as about getting there and maintaining ketosis."

KDRAFT also had a twist that's becoming more common among 

ketogenic eating plans: lots of vegetables. Dr. Taylor asked participants to 

concentrate on nonstarchy vegetables and forgo potatoes, corn, beans, and lima beans, although some people did enjoy peas occasionally.

"We used to be think we had to restrict vegetables or people would go out of ketosis more easily. But that doesn't seem to be true. We focused a lot on eating vegetables, and everyone increased their vegetable intake dramatically. We actually tried to use vegetables as a vehicle for fat. For example, people would roast Brussels sprouts or broccoli in olive oil and then put melted butter on it. It was pretty much, 'Eat all the vegetables you can and put fat on them.'"

Fruits are full of sugar, so they are not liberally used in most ketogenic diets, but KDRAFT did allow one type: berries, and blueberries in particular. "We had people eating a couple of small handfuls of berries throughout the day and still being able to maintain ketosis. We did severely cut back on the amount and type of fruit people could have, but berries seemed to work well."

Whipping cream had a place, too. "It fit really well in the diet, because it's basically all fat," Dr. Taylor said. "It's used more often in pediatric ketogenic diets as a milk substitute. One thing our subjects liked to do was use it to make a sweet snack. All it takes is a packet of [stevia] sweetener and some vanilla. Then you whip and freeze it and it's like an ice cream dessert."

After the initial drop-outs, the remaining study pairs embraced the intervention enthusiastically.
"When the study partner took the diet on too, we had our best success. One of our last pairs had an entire family join in – children, grandchildren, everyone decided to follow the diet. That is a very helpful piece to this. It's difficult to always say, 'Here's our normal food and here's the keto food over here.'"
The dropouts occurred very early. These study pairs, all of whom included patients with moderate Alzheimer's, never embraced the plan at all, and this is a telling point, Dr. Taylor noted.

"When you get to a level of dementia there are so many other things in the caregiving process that taking on big behavioral changes is very difficult."

Although the study showed that the diet wasn't practical for sicker patients at home, it still might be beneficial in other settings, said Debra Sullivan, PhD, RD. Dr. Sullivan chairs the department of dietetics and nutrition at the University of Kansas Medical Center and holds the Midwest Dairy Council Endowed Professorship in Clinical Nutrition.

"I think that we might be able to create a version of the diet that could be used in an institutional setting for our more advanced patients," she said. "But there's no denying that this can be challenging. It's a big change from the way the typical American eats."

None of the KDRAFT participants experienced any lipid changes, for either better or worse. The 3-month intervention was long enough to have picked up such changes if they were in the offing, said principal investigator Russell Swerdlow, MD. While there are mixed data on ketogenic diets' atherogenic effects, many people respond positively, with improved cholesterol.

"Much of what it comes down to is, are you in a catabolic or anabolic states? Are you building up or tearing down? 

Excessive cholesterol is a sign of being overfed and laying down energy supplies. You take in carbon and turn it into cholesterol. 

But if you can trick your body into a catabolic state – essentially make it think it's starving, which a ketogenic diet does – then you have consistently low insulin levels, and you don't turn on the cholesterol synthesis pathway. 

You may increase your cholesterol intake through diet, but you're not synthesizing it in your body, and that synthesis is what really drives your cholesterol level. If you're not overeating, your body's production goes down."

Dr. Swerdlow isn't the only clinician researcher looking at how a ketogenic diet might influence cognition. Suzanne Craft, PhD, well known for her investigations of the role of insulin signaling and therapy in AD, is running a ketogenic diet trial as well.

 9/7/2017 Fueling the Alzheimer's brain with fat | Internal Medicine News