Saturday, September 30, 2017

Re: White House Aides Are Stopping Deal With Assange?

Crooks in both parties protect Hilary Clinton treason missing emails.

Let investigators commit to lies.

Then pardon Assange to get truth

Expose fake news lies treason.

Crooks all over deep state

> White House Aides Are Stopping Deal With Assange, Congressman Says
>
> by IWB · September 26, 2017
>
> by Disobedient Media
>
> Source: White House Aides Are Stopping Deal With Assange, Congressman Says Via @dailycaller
>
> President Donald Trump is being blocked from knowing he can pardon WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in exchange for information vindicating Russia of hacking allegations, according to Republican California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher.
>
> Trump told reporters Sunday that has “never heard” of a potential deal with Assange.
>
> “I think the president’s answer indicates that there is a wall around him that is being created by people who do not want to expose this fraud that there was collusion between our intelligence community and the leaders of the Democratic Party,” Rohrabacher told The Daily Caller Tuesday in a phone interview.
>
> Rohrabacher met with Assange in August at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where the WikiLeaks founder has lived in asylum since 2012 due to now-dropped sexual assault charges in Sweden. However, American authorities are reportedly still investigating Assange for his role in disseminating thousands of classified U.S. documents.
>
> The U.S intelligence community has also said that Russian state actors were involved with the hacking and leaking of Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta’s emails. Rohrabacher told TheDC Tuesday that he “didn’t go into detail other than the DNC” with Assange.
>
> The WikiLeaks founder has previously said that Russia was not the source of either the Podesta or DNC emails that his site released.
>
> Rohrabacher said that a pardon would likely have to occur for Assange to give up this information about the source of the DNC emails. Assange has long maintained that he would never reveal a source, but Rohrabacher said that Assange now “wants to get out of the Ecuadorian embassy.”
>
> Rohrabacher told TheDC that he has yet to view the information Assange says vindicates Russia, but that Assange would be able to exchange it if the president “is on board.” The president is able to preemptively pardon someone.
>
> The congressman spoke to chief of staff John Kelly two weeks ago about the potential deal with Assange
>
> “This would have to be a cooperative effort between his own staff and the leadership in the intelligence communities to try to prevent the president from making the decision as to whether or not he wants to take the steps necessary to expose this horrendous lie that was shoved down the American people’s throats so incredibly earlier this year,”
>  

Friday, September 29, 2017

change your phone number. move to a new state

google your phone number
if you find your name by your phone number then it is time to change your phone number
or just throw away your phones to improve your health.
Use Free google voice if you have to have a number.

Good idea to move to a new state every few years.
Get a new drivers license
Equifax hackers stole your drivers license number, SSN, addy, name, etc.

The more frequently you change your information
the harder it is for crooks to defeat you.
If they cannot find you electronically you are much safer simpler faster to go.

Some states make you file a tax return every year!
Texas does not have a state income tax, nor does sunny Florida, TN,
or cold NH, SD, WY, WA, AK,
No forms, less hassle.  

Hard to find all the details on paperwork to pick the best state.
ARkansas the cheapest property tax if you are an idiot and own property.
Taxes, drugs, corruption, and stupidity of all kinds gets into prices you pay for everything
Go to stores and check.  Download regional price indexes by city and state.
Huge differences inflation deflation some areas twice as expensive.

SDakota seems the best on drivers registration privacy
License $ low but maybe not as good as some other states hard to check.
No car -> no car fees! no car theft! 
Walk more to live longer.
Hawaii the best beach, best water, best air, best weather year round but you pay for the long supply lines to the islands that have no natural resources except fruits, nuts, coffee, agriculture and location.
Get outdoors all day and breathe fresh air.
Throw away all heaters, air conditioners, air filters...

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Fwd: HRC and Statute of Limitations


> http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/09/hillarys_espionage_and_the_statute_of_limitations.html
>
>  
>
> September 23, 2017
>
> Hillary's Espionage and the Statute of Limitations
>
> By Mark A. Hewitt
>
> Alger Hiss was a U.S. State Department official who was accused in 1948 of being a Soviet spy.  Hiss's indictment stemmed from alleged espionage in the form of secret State Department documents spirited out of Foggy Bottom and into the hands of persons "not authorized to receive" them.  "The Pumpkin Papers" consisted of sixty-five pages of retyped secret State Department documents, four pages in Hiss's own handwriting of copied State Department cables, and five rolls of developed and undeveloped 35mm film.  
>
> Being charged under the Espionage Act was appropriate for those who obtained any information relating to the national defense and delivered that information to someone who was not authorized to have it.  The former State Department official, Alger Hiss, typed classified information on his office typewriter, slipped the copies into a briefcase, removed classified information from the State Department, and provided all of this to his Soviet handler, who photographed and microfilmed it.  The FBI wished to prosecute Alger Hiss for espionage, but the Justice Department indicated that the statute of limitations had run out, and Hiss was convicted of the lesser crime, perjury, for lying to the FBI.
>
> Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton insisted that she "had broken no rules" to conduct government business through the use of a private email service in lieu of the U.S. government's unclassified system, the Non-Classified Internet Protocol (IP) Router Network (abbreviated as NIPRNet) and the Secret Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNet).  These are a system of interconnected computer networks used by the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Department of State to transmit classified information.
>
> The U.S. government has spent billions of dollars developing, deploying, and protecting its internet protocol router networks to enable authorized government officials to conduct the business of government, properly exchange information, and intelligence, up to and including information classified SECRET, with others in the government (and their contractors) who are authorized and entitled to have it.  Mrs. Clinton purposely avoided using the government's networks through the use of a homebrew server.  That she found a way to transmit countless classified documents, up to and including special access program material, to her personal server has been made public and is not in question.
>
> The former Democratic presidential candidate disclosed that she and her aides had deleted more than 30,000 emails she deemed "personal."  For a frame of reference, 30,000 emails printed out represents a stack of 60 reams of paper, a stack 11 feet tall.  When the FBI retrieved the spools of microfilm, the Alger Hiss "Pumpkin Papers" printed out to a stack four and a half feet tall.
>
> Hillary Clinton and the FBI have learned much from the Alger Hiss case.  The American public will not be able to read a transcript of Hillary Clinton's interview with the FBI, because the bureau did not transcribe it.  Furthermore, Mrs. Clinton was also not placed under oath during the three-and-a-half-hour interview.  When Mrs. Clinton wasn't placed under oath, she could not be charged with lying to the FBI, as Alger Hiss was eventually charged with and convicted of.
>
> There doesn't seem to be a race against the clock for the Trump DOJ to charge Mrs. Clinton with espionage.  Alger Hiss escaped prosecution under the Espionage Act of 1917 due to the statute of limitations having expired.  Also, there was no appetite by the DOJ to charge the former senior State Department official and Democrat lawyer.  Although federal statute USC 3282 provides for a five-year statute of limitation for the vast majority of federal crimes, this statute of limitations does not necessarily stand in the case of espionage prosecution.  It is generally agreed by legal scholars that acts of espionage can be prosecuted for at least ten years after the alleged act.  
>
> I wish Congressman Trey Gowdy could give Attorney General Sessions a lesson on Spoliation of Evidence, with which attorneys fresh out of law school are familiar.  Hillary Clinton's deletion of 30,000 emails is a classic case.  When parties fail to produce relevant evidence within their span of control, evidence they are otherwise naturally expected to possess, the U.S. legal system allows and even mandates that unfavorable presumptions be drawn against them.  So when some item of relevant evidence – whether documents, physical objects, or data relevant to an ongoing legal matter – is destroyed, discarded, or modified in some way, the U.S. legal system allows us to presume that the missing evidence was unfavorable to that party and allows us

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Stolen tablet

Got new android tablet  
Cheap
Small
Easy to carry
Use instead of phone
WiFi only
Can do most input on it
Read stuff

Car broke in at home
Stole Aaa card insurance card registration
2 old hats
1 old beanie
Laundry detergent 50 cents worth
Knife
2$ coins

I left trunk open 7 years
They climbed over dead bike and junk to get into center console  
Why I store junk on three 
Make them work clean out my junk

Cannibal couple hunted for victims on dating sites before drugging, butchering and eating them

Saturday, September 16, 2017

Beach for white people Grand Strand. South Carolina.

Cooler than Florida
Less populated.
Fast drive into mountains if hurricane.

Worth investigating.

Fresh Beach area blow fresh air thru house all night.
Probiotic for lungs.

Oxygen kills cancer cells.
Green trees pump oxygen onto air.
Forested state.
Medical college past the national Forest.

> Looks like a really nice area.
> Wish it wasn't so far away.
> Would like to explore.
>
> Ruthe
>
>
> On Friday, July 28, 2017 2:21 PM, "Joe wrote:
>
>
> Myrtle Beach international airport.
>
> 60 miles of beaches.
> Boardwalk.
> Beach houses, condos.
> Not so expensive.
>
> 20 golf courses.
> Medical College.
> High rated hospitals.
> National Forest.
> Party colleges too.
> Huge shopping. Outlets.
> 1800 Restaurants.
> 500 hotels.
>
> Train local area and Amtrak.
>
> I-40 to Los Angeles. Flagstaff. Albuquerque. Arkansas. Oklahoma City. Nashville Tennessee.
>
> I-95 to DC. NYC. Boston.
> Best medical care in USA.
> Disney world
>
> Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Strand?wprov=sfla1
>
>

Fwd: German war history big government politically correct



Germans should move to Germany and write their own history.

Muslims are not Germans.

Stalin, Lenin, Mao, Roosevelt, etc. were not saints, but are deified in some quarters because they are politically correct big government statists communists socialists more useful than dead Germans of any persuasion who cannot defend themselves or talk about themselves or even get discussed.  





Tuesday, September 12, 2017

How a High-Gradient Magnetic Field Could Affect Cell Life | Scientific Reports

Moving steel cars trucks planes trains ships disrupt your magnetic cellular processes.

Sell vehicles
Walk
Or
Ride horse buggy.
Wood carbon fiber bicycles.
Wooden ships sail boats

Traditional is better
I am rereading cell phone non ionizing radiation dangers. This is in addition to that danger.

Https://www.nature.com/articles/srep37407?WT.feed_name=subjects_physical-sciences

Monday, September 11, 2017

Sunday, September 10, 2017

No Starch Solution. Avoid grains.

Starch is probably the worst diet I ever heard of unless there is a high sugar diet.
It may be cheap, popular, tasty, and easy to find at any junk food establishment but it is not healthy.

I now completely avoid starchy foods such as flour, potatoes, white rice, bread, corn meal, tacos, crackers, chips, etc.
Remember 3rd grade teacher gave us a cracker and chew for a few minutes so saliva would change it to sugars.

I used to eat a lot of starch - oats and brown rice when I was running 20 miles per day carbo loading.
At 100 calories per mile I could easily burn off 2000 calories of carbos per day.
The problem becomes shrinking body weight, get too skinny after running so much for years.

If you are not running a lot then you do not need a lot of empty calories from starch.
Focus on essential oils, vitamins, minerals, vegetables, polyphenols, nuts, seeds, fruits, berries, herbs, spices, antioxidants, etc.
Go pick wild food - you will not find much starch!

Most modern diseases started after farming of grains.
Grain Brain Dementia, diabetes, cancer, heart attack, stroke, obesity, arthritis, appendicitis, hemorrhoids, autoimmune, asthma, autism, etc.
Farming has been a catastrophe but made food cheap for big populations with dementia fighting wars with each other all the time.

A good review of the history and biochemistry in Gary Taubes "good calories, bad calories"

Many current studies all pointing to the fact that modern diets have too much carbos and not enough fats.

https://www.drmcdougall.com/health/shopping/books/starch-solution/

The Starch Solution by John A. McDougall, M.D.

Fact: Carbs are good for you.

From Atkins to Dukan, fear of the almighty carb has taken over the diet industry for the past few decades—even the mere mention of a starch-heavy food is enough to trigger an avalanche of shame and longing.

But the truth is, carbs are not the enemy.

Now, bestselling author John A. McDougall, MD, and his kitchen-savvy wife, Mary, prove that a starch-rich diet can actually help you lose weight, prevent a variety of ills, and even cure common diseases.

The Starch Solution is based on a simple swap:
By fueling your body primarily with carbohydrates rather than proteins and fats, you'll feel satisfied, boost energy, and look and feel your best.

Naples, Florida flooded, blown away, retirement

I was looking at this area that is right now being clobbered by Hurricane Irma.

Interesting demographics.

median income for a family was $102,262. 

94% white

But the whole city is probably now flooded or blown away.

Probably the education budgets in Texas and Florida will get clobbered to provide $ for rebuilding infrastructure, etc.

Maybe I should get a metallic RV to protect myself from cell phone, wifi, dirty electricity.

And just travel to areas with good weather throughout the year.  Need to throw away more "stuff".  

Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples%2C_Florida?wprov=sfla1




Airstream cell wifi radiation reflector home

Add aluminum shutters and awnings.

Sleep safe not blasted by dirty electromagnetic radiation. Eat organic snakes and alligators.

Get rich in Texas Florida rebuilding homes for illegals in dumb places

where they will get flooded again soon at great cost to taxpayers.

Seems concrete domes protect from wind.
20 foot concrete pillars may be above most floods.
Safety does not sell
Style sells.

American dream big fancy house on stolen native American land eating too much junk food​ grain brain dementia.

Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airstream?wprov=sfla1

Harvey brings minor damage, class cancellations to Texas universities | The Texas Tribune

https://www.texastribune.org/2017/08/28/colleges-houston-along-coast-suffer-damage-and-cancel-classes-due-harv/

My Interview with Stephen Penman: Professor of Accounting at the Columbia Business School - ValueWalk

https://www.valuewalk.com/2011/08/interview-stephen-penman-professor-accounting-columbia-business-school/

Bubble Houses (Hobe Sound, Florida)

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_Houses_%28Hobe_Sound%2C_Florida%29?wprov=sfla1

Hurricane-proof building

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane-proof_building?wprov=sfla1

Monolithic dome

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monolithic_dome?wprov=sfla1

Naples, Florida flooded, blown away, retirement

Cheap lots? Take a risk. Get rich off recovery. Build m right!

median income for a family was $102,262. 

94% white

Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples%2C_Florida?wprov=sfla1

Money Manipulation

http://www.biblebelievers.org.au/moneymad.htm

Saturday, September 9, 2017

The Harmful Effects of Electromagnetic Fields Explained

PhD Caltech
Old professor Washington State University

The video adds much useful info

Political corruption conspiracies.

Brain most sensitive
Heart
Atrial fibrillation
Etc

Practical ways to protect yourself some that I was aware of decades ago. I only got smart phone a year ago. Keep things turned off. Unplugged.
Peak summer electric bill was $20 this summer.

I hate cordless phones, wireless mice keyboards microwave ovens etc.

Wired phones much better than cell phones. Store in oven even if turned off.

WiFi safer than cell phones. But wired is better. Or meet in person.

Learn iron steel concrete blocking if bad rays. College engineering. Get rich off solutions.

Bad.light another huge problem. LED blindness. Use old tungsten light bulbs or candles.

Http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/09/03/electromagnetic-fields-harmful-effects.aspx

Mossack Fonseca: Nazi, CIA Nevada Rothschild

Reno Nevada.
Epicenter

$30 trillion.
Bigger than USA economy?

Crime of the century?

How to stamp out money laundering???? Drugs. Dictators.

Http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-04-03/mossack-fonseca-nazi-cia-and-nevada-connections-and-why-its-now-rothschilds-turn

avoid electronics

This is just one more piece of evidence on the danger of electronics and why people are so screwed up these days as I have talked about for decades.

Practical advice is to minimize the use of electronics, especially electric cars with huge batteries, dangerous voltages, spinning armatures, wiring, etc.
Cordless telephones also really bad and not needed.
Rotary dial phones the best, and the old style computers with a modem and telephone line connection.

Move to modern steel frame skyscraper in large city where it is hard to get cell phone reception anyway
(even my brick apartment near a cell phone tower does not get many bars on my smart phone - My Kansas ranch got much better cell phone reception).
Granite countertop, steel, concrete good ray stoppers.
Remove refrigerators, microwave ovens, TVs, and all electronics not needed.
Even better call electric company and cancel electric service.
Cover walls and windows with aluminum foil.
Move to a climate where you don't need heaters or air conditioners.
Gas heat, propane, fuel oil, etc. safer than electric.
Cook with gas, outdoor BBQ, wok, hibachi,...

If you use cell phone tape it into a cast iron frying pan and aim it toward cell tower
(away from you).
Use earphones / microphones.
Never put cell phone close to your head.

Many people survive and thrive with wifi at work, plain old telephone service,…
Do what they do and get rich.
Just make sure when you go home to sleep you have 8 hours without too much electronic magnetic radiation.

I think LED TV Computers lights are a worse problem, hard to avoid.
Use natural sunlight and read real paper books, magazines, etc.
Avoid computer cell phone tracking disinformation…


Calcium channels, free radicals and the effects of EMF explained

mercola.com
Sun, 03 Sep 2017 17:04 UTC



I've often noted that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are a pernicious, hidden health risk. But exactly how does this kind of microwave radiation damage your health? Martin Pall, Ph.D., has identified and published research describing the likely molecular mechanisms of how EMFs from cellphones and wireless technologies damage plants, animals and humans.1,2 ,3,4

Pall has a bachelor's in physics from Johns Hopkins and a Ph.D. in biochemistry and genetics from Caltech, and is uniquely qualified for this type of research. For the past 18 years, he's been scouring the medical literature, integrating and drawing parallels between work done by others to answer this pressing question. Pall explains:

"There is a huge amount of information out here that nobody has the time to integrate, digest and make connections [between]. That's what I've been doing ... I was interested in EMFs before I could understand how they worked. Then I stumbled onto two papers that told me, 'Well, this looks like the way they work,' and then I dug out more and more papers ...

What the [initial two] studies showed was that you could block or greatly lower the effects [of EMF] by using calcium channel blockers ... That was the key observation ...

Now [I have found] 26 [papers] ... They all show that EMFs work by activating what are called voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). These are channels in the outer membrane of the cell, the plasma membrane that surrounds all our cells. When they're activated, they open up and allow calcium to flow into the cell. It's the excess calcium in the cell which is responsible for most if not all of the [biological effects]."

EMFs and Intracellular Calcium

When you expose cells to EMFs, there's increased intercellular calcium. You also get increases in calcium signaling, which is important as well, in terms of explaining the damage EMFs cause. For the past 25 years, the industry has claimed that non-ionizing radiation is harmless and that the only radiation worth wo

Carbohydrate Metabolism | Anatomy and Physiology II

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/ap2/chapter/carbohydrate-metabolism-no-content/

Fwd: The Social Security Administration sees dead people.


> This is why we’ll never see reform – too much is riding on fake identities needed for “other purposes.”
>  
> IG: 6.5M Social Security Numbers Linked to People Aged 112 & Up
>
> The Social Security Administration sees dead people.
>
> A report from the Office of the Inspector General found that there are 6.5 million active Social Security numbers on file which belong to people aged 112 and up. Meanwhile, there are only 35 people older than 112 in the world.
>
> The Office of Inspector General believes that this could be a huge avenue for fraud and waste. For example, from 2008-2011, Social Security numbers for nearly 4,000 people over the age of 100 were run through the E-Verify system, which determines work eligibility. Recently, a man opened bank accounts for two people born in the late 1800s.
>
> The inspector general says this is the result of the Social Security Administration poorly managing the data. Ron Johnson, chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, had a different take on the report.
>
> “Tens of thousands of these numbers are currently being used to report wages to the Social Security Administration and to the IRS. People are fraudulently, but successfully, applying for jobs and benefits with these numbers,” Johnson said.
>
> The Social Security Administration says it doesn’t have the resources to fix this problem and would rather focus on accurately paying benefits.
>
> Read more from NPR.org:
>
> Here are some other findings:
>
> "For Tax Years 2006 through 2011, SSA received reports that individuals using 66,920 SSNs had approximately $3.1 billion in wages, tips, and self-employment income. SSA transferred the earnings to the Earnings Suspense File because the employees' or self-employed individuals' names on the earnings reports did not match the numberholders' names.
>
> "During Calendar Years 2008 through 2011, employers made 4,024 E-Verify inquiries using 3,873 SSNs belonging to numberholders born before June 16, 1901.
>
> In a joint statement, Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, which oversees the Social Security Administration, and ranking member Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., criticized the department.
>
> "It is incredible that the Social Security Administration in 2015 does not have the technical sophistication to ensure that people they know to be deceased are actually noted as dead," Johnson said.
>
> Carper added: "Not only do these types of avoidable errors waste millions of taxpayers' dollars annually and expose our citizens to identity theft, but they also undermine confidence in our government."
>
>  

Friday, September 8, 2017

Carbohydrate Metabolism | Anatomy and Physiology II

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/ap2/chapter/carbohydrate-metabolism-no-content/

Tornadoes don’t happen in mountains.

Many advantages to high altitude.

Bright sun. Fresh air.

Low germs mold snakes bugs viruses homeless hippies.

Http://www.ustornadoes.com/2013/03/14/tornadoes-dont-happen-in-mountains-or-do-they-debunking-the-myth/

Lavish new apartments going up everywhere near university. $750 includes cable internet water sewer electricity fully furnished. Knock down classic old houses across from math computer Dept.

Tornadoes don’t happen in mountains.

Many advantages to high altitude.

Bright sun. Fresh air.

Low germs mold snakes bugs viruses homeless hippies.

Http://www.ustornadoes.com/2013/03/14/tornadoes-dont-happen-in-mountains-or-do-they-debunking-the-myth/

Lavish new apartments going up everywhere near university. $750 includes cable internet water sewer electricity fully furnished. Knock down classic old houses across from math computer Dept.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Korea No Fly Zone, Blockade? Mexican meth.

Why not shoot down any missile that North Korea Launches?
Are anti-missiles a hoax?
ICBMs take off slow, can be spotted soon after launch, big, bulky, filled with explosive fuels.
Launch a fast anti missile from DMZ or ship and blow it up before it gets out of N Korea borders.

Probably should have blockaded N Korea 70 years ago.

No trading with China until they close their border with N Korea.

Pull our troops out of South Korea.
South Korea is a large rich country with better internet than USA.
They can pay for their own defense now.
Save USA $ for USA taxpayers and citizens.
Give Korea to Japan if the Koreans cannot manage their own affairs.

Our ships cannot collide with other ships if they are in dry dock or storage.
Save $ and fossil fuels by retiring most ships and send captains to rehab.

Put our fighting lesbians on the Mexican Border.
Stop opioids at the Border.
Stop Nazi meth (rediscovered in Missouri) at the border.
Stop all drugs at the Border to bankrupt Taliban and Muslims.
Stop illegal persons at the Border.
If our fighting lesbians fail then fire them.

Use $ for building walls, killer drones, removal of roads to Mexico, removal of airports, restocking bison on the plains, restoring the traditional environment, etc.

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Virtual Reality Number Theory Crypto Cracker GPU Game $ research funding

Computers are rapidly becoming more useful to Number Theory.
Games and Virtual Reality are a fast growing use of computers (vs. many areas flat or shrinking).
Games and Virtual Reality need powerful computers and graphics that are being sold, now.
Number theory also needs powerful computers and graphics to update Ulam's spiral and maybe discover new patterns that can be proven.

CPU and graphics GPU are closely coupled on all computers and smart phones nowadays.
GPU is being used for General Processing GPGPU.
Numerous APIs to use this power are available for Games, Virtual Reality, machine learning, linear algebra,etc.
Mathematica, Matlab, etc. have implementations that may not be optimized or useful for particular applications.

Number theory is an ideal topic to use this power:
Factor table generation.
Semiprime factorization RSA crypto cracker.
3-D Visualization of patterns in numbers, factors, etc.

Step thru natural numbers 1,2,3,... to very large - 1000 digits or more?
Record the prime factors and multiplicities of each factor
At each step find the 2 middlemost factors by my new algorithm. 
In the case of semiprimes would be the only 2 nontrivial factors.

At the same time, on the same chip, visualize the numbers and factors from many directions:
1.  The number of factors 
2.  The peak multiplicity of the factors
3.  The sum of the digits of the number
4.  The mod products of the digits of the number
5.  The sum of the odd digits of the number divided by the peak multiplicity of the factors
......Thousands of such computations limited only by creativity 

Convert to 3d triangular mesh.
Color each vertex.
Display the mesh as computer steps thru the natural numbers 1,2,3,...
Look for additional patterns
Run thru machine learning algorithms (common in GPGPU).
Repeat, debug, tune, optimize for speed and larger numbers.
Wondering how big I can get in 1 week run time: 100s of digits? 1000s?

Probably use base 30 numbers instead of base 10.
GPU Chips are designed for half precision 16 bit floating point instead of single or double precision.
Need to study carefully - how to best do integers with cores optimized for floating point graphics.

I have an iMac on my desk so I will have to learn Apple Swift Metal 2 programming language (pedal on the metal) low level, manually managing threads on:
480  shading units,  
 24   TMUs texture mapping units,  
   8   ROPs  Raster Output Units. 
Apple will ship a new design $6000 iMac before Xmas 
with 18 core CPU and thousands of GPU cores for 22 teraflops?
Apple is behind in games and virtual reality 
so playing catch up with lowball pricing (unusual for Apple).

Nvidia water cooled Tesla GPGPU board is faster and uses CUDA plain C language API
but costs more I don't want to waste time to learn it if I can get my Apple iMac to work.
But coding does look more familiar - C language CUDA vs Apple Swift Metal.    
Google cloud offers 75 cents per hour to use a Nvidia Tesla but probably even harder to learn than setting up a computer myself that I can manage on my desk and run all winter for hard experiments and home heater.

I am looking at music programming to add auralization to visualization.
Computers / games are designed for sound, essential.  
Maybe I can use for hearing numbers in addition to seeing.
I could do that in 1992 -- very useful to have sound in addition to graphics.

It is getting harder to do simple work.
Even "hello world" or "hello triangle" is hard.
Hard even to find short succinct documentation on fancy new tools.
If I can get it to work then I can sell it on the Apple store for
Apple iPhone, iMac, iPad, iPod, iWatch,... and it will run!
But I would prefer faster to learn simpler tools that do less but do it faster.
Just interested in positive integers. 
Visualization a plus but optional.

Seems to be a lot of projects and some $ funding in Missouri:

-------------------------------------------------------------------

"There are more than 350 universities worldwide teaching the CUDA programming language, 
and more than 100,000 programmers actively developing applications on CUDA GPUs," 
said Bill Dally, chief scientist at NVIDIA.

CUDA Research Centers are recognized institutions that embrace and utilize GPU Computing across multiple research fields. 

CUDA Teaching Centers have integrated GPU computing techniques into their mainstream computer programming curriculum. 

-----------------------------------

Mizzou:

The CUDA Research Center at University of Missouri was established to support a variety of research activities employing CUDA technology. 

Two key research thrusts: the design of runtime systems for CPU-GPU clusters, 
and the study of programming models and parallelization mechanisms to allow the deployment of irregular applications on GPUs. 

Recently, it was awarded a grant by the National Science Foundation to design scheduling and virtualization technologies to efficiently enable many-core devices in cluster and cloud environments.

----------------------------------------------------

https://www.ucmo.edu/news/nvida.cfm

WARRENSBURG, MO (Jan. 5, 2015)  -- The University of Central Missouri has been named a CUDA® Teaching Center by NVIDIA, the world leader in visual computing. 

As a CUDA Teaching Center, UCM will have access to NVIDIA GPU hardware and NVIDIA parallel programming experts and resources,  including 
educational webinars, 
an array of teaching materials, 
and access to the NVIDIA CUDA Cloud Training Program.

The CUDA parallel programming model is an important element of the NVIDIA accelerated computing platform, the leading platform for accelerating data analytics and scientific computing. 

CUDA enables programmers to achieve dramatic increases in computing performance by harnessing the power of NVIDIA® GPU accelerators.

CUDA Teaching Centers are recognized institutions that have integrated GPU-accelerated computing techniques into their mainstream computer programming curriculum. 

UCM was recognized for its commitment to advancing the state of parallel programming education.

 "We are extremely pleased that NVIDIA has named UCM a CUDA® Teaching Center. 

This designation is a direct reflection of the hard work of UCM's faculty members in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science," said Deborah Curtis, provost and chief learning officer. 

"Dr. Cao and Dr. Yue and their colleagues understand the value of partnerships that will provide a strong technological learning environment for our students." 

As part of the CUDA Teaching Center program, 
NVIDIA has provided GPU accelerators, 
supporting materials and resources to support the university's teaching efforts. 
The GPUs will be installed in the university's CUDA lab
within the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science will offer the course CS 5510 (Introduction to Parallel Computing) on a yearly basis beginning in fall 2015.   
Theoretical and practical study of parallel computing. 
Topics include parallel architectures, network topologies, parallel schemes and related strategies, parallel algorithms, MPI, OpenMP, and 
graphics processing units based on computing using CUDA C and OpenACC. 

It is a three-credit-hours course and will be given in the UCM CUDA Lab 
with remote access to the GPU cluster 
for CUDA C/C++ development, debugging, and experimental purposes.







==============================

Accessing APIs in Swift 3. The biggest change is to the API language. Accessing Apple APIs is an essential part of building software in Swift (and most modern languages). 

Apple has radically changed the API language to emphasize clarity. 

You can read more about the new syntax at Swift.org.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Re: Hippie commune in Missouri's Bible Belt; socialists seek peace

Lunatics are all over the rural areas.
These hippies are not the worst.
Hippies moved to rural to escape cities 60s nuclear cold war and got kicked out of San Francisco for laziness could not pay rent.
Mentally ill, as the article states.

They need to get an education and get a job.
No mentally healthy person will move to rural areas and contemplate their navel or watch TV.
Much work needs to be done.
If you exercise, eat well, and live healthy you will want to get up early and get to work at 8AM.
Best jobs are in the cities which is why almost the whole population left the farms over the last 100 years.

I have driven around all over in this area and attended a drug court there and read the newspapers.
Very beautiful but the population are all mentally ill, drug addicts, maybe the highest drug overdose in the USA.
The whole hillbilly area all the way to Tennessee, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, Vermont….
Same as Humboldt county California.
Hard to raise a kid to adulthood before they are dead or completely dysfunctional.
Read some eye opening books by a kid that survived to graduate from college and write about the problem.
Just avoid those areas, get a license, a job and compete to find the best solution to problems.

J. C. JOHN wrote:

Darn! I thought all them hippies went to Oregon and Alaska!
Now I find out there's some about an hour or two away!
Fortunately they pretty much stay put in their little bit of hippie land.

http://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article169607787.html

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of early death -- ScienceDaily

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170827101750.htm

Move to Texas Now!

$ flowing in from Federal Government
$ flowing in from Lloyds of London and all the big insurance companies around the world
Workers flowing in from all over.
Money for lots of needed work.
Illegals moving out after losing their homes and jobs; cops chasing them.
Uninsured moving out cannot afford to rebuild.
Lazy and idiots moving out.
Crime decreasing.

All races and religions coming together and working to rebuild in peace and love.
Texas more functional than other large states and has always been a very diverse state.
I swam in all black swimming pools when I was stationed there in military - no problem.

Lots of good jobs opening up if you have the skills.
Pass FEMA flood insurance adjuster exam online in 1 day.
Pack and move to Texas tomorrow.
Weather cooling, nice sunny warm winter.

Dont be part of the problem: lazy eloi sheeple watching TV instead of helping out.
Be part of the solution: protestant work ethic.
Great jobs for years of rebuilding.
Buy cheap and develop properties properly - flood resistant, hurricane resistant, cheap, strong,...
Build it right so it wont flood so easily steel towers above the waters on high ground.
Get degrees and licenses in engineering, city planning, utilities, emergency medicine, etc.
Empire State Building had landing dock for dirigible.
Dirigibles good for travel when roads bridges are flooded, destroyed.
Air and boat transport useful in such times.

J. C. JOHN wrote:

Good thing you didn't move to Houston area.
Big mess.
Soon it's going to get real interesting.
Food getting scarce, flooding will continue for weeks.
Evacuation holding centers full of people expecting to be taken care if....

John

Saturday, September 2, 2017

Re: Healthy Altitude Microbiome Disease too Hot too Cold weather

Gas prices up 40 cents per gallon here.
High temperature 77 degrees yesterday been cool all summer after a warm winter.

Sounds like a great idea that will sell whether it works or not.
Probably many regimes already patented.
Maybe already a proven therapy.

Doctors have techniques for getting into sinuses with cameras, surgical tools, etc.
Maybe some sort of consumer device could be designed like a grease gun.
Squirt sauerkraut, yogurt, probiotic powders, etc. into the sinuses.

Fecal transplants are a proven therapy to cure diseased guts.

There is apparently a brain microbiome.
Maybe can inject healthy microbes into brains to cure stupidity!

For those who do not eat sauerkraut or yogurt.
Must make at home.
Commercial sauerkraut and yogurt are mostly a junk food.


Bob > wrote:

There's a fungus among us.

I am trying to figure a way to market "probiotics" for nasal/sinus use.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Healthy Altitude Microbiome Disease too Hot too Cold weather

Cold weather drives you indoors where you will get sick from molds and toxic chemicals in furniture, clothes, carpets, walls, etc.

Hot weather drives you indoors where you will get sick from molds and toxic chemicals in furniture, clothes, carpets, walls, etc.

Hawaii you can get out all day every day of the year and run the fans all night for fresh air.
Or sleep in Tent then roll up and walk all day.

Germs in your nose match germs in your house, pets, mice, rats, Zoonoses.

Most of your genes are in the microbes growing in you, good and bad.
Help your body defeat disease by growing good microbes in your nose, gut, etc.

High altitude drains my sinuses so good bacteria can grow well.
Plus high is close to sun so skin (solar panel) can produce needed natural chemicals.
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Coastal areas filled with mold.
100 degree Fresno very bad molds growing rampant in buildings that air conditioning circulates into you.

Mold will stick with you for life, perpetual sickness, Mold grows inside you - sinuses, etc.
Need clean out therapy, immune balance, high altitude.

In Missouri I use fans on all summer nights to bring in oxygen and healthy bacteria in natural air to grow good mold indoors.
Still not good enough, need very high altitude for months to drain sinuses properly.
Cold weather in winter helps - freezes out the water in the air zero humidity.

If you can t run 7 miles and get to work by 8AM then you may have mold growing near your brain leading to Alzheimers and dementia.

Sinuses are close to the brain.
Bugs and germs can penetrate the brain from the sinuses.
Keep your sinuses healthy with lots of good microbes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3920250/

Chronic Illness Associated with Mold and Mycotoxins:

Naso-Sinus Fungal Biofilm the Culprit?

Exposure to water damaged buildings (WDB) have been associated with numerous health problems that include fungal sinusitis, abnormalities in T and B cells, central and peripheral neuropathy, asthma, sarcoidosis, respiratory infections and chronic fatigue

It has been well established that mold and mycotoxins are important constituents of the milieu in WDB that can lead to illness [15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22]. Using a sensitive and specific assay developed by RealTime Laboratories (RTL), we recently published a study linking the presence of aflatoxins (AT), ochratoxin A (OTA) and/or macrocyclic trichothecenes (MT) to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) [14]. The specific methods for these assays have been previously published [14].

A significant number of these chronically ill patients were ill for many years, with an average duration of more than seven years (range 2 36).

Furthermore, over 90% of the patients gave a history of exposure to a WDB, mold or both.

Exposure histories often indicated the WDB/mold exposure occurred many years prior to the mycotoxin testing.
Many of these patients have not had recent or current exposure to a WDB or moldy environment.

Despite the remote history of exposure, these patients had chronic symptoms and the presence of significantly elevated concentrations of AT, OTA and MT in their urine specimens.

The persistence of mycotoxins suggests that there may be an internal source of mold that represents a reservoir for ongoing mold toxins that are excreted in the urine.

Otherwise, one would anticipate that the toxins would have cleared over time.

Herein, we discuss the concept that the nose and sinuses may be major internal reservoirs where the mold is harbored in biofilm communities and generates internal mycotoxins.


2.1. Case One

A 71 year old (y.o.) female was first seen in 1989 with a long standing chronic illness that was subsequently diagnosed as CFS.
She had been symptomatic since approximately 1970.
She met the Fukuda criteria for CFS as published in 1994 [23].
She has remained chronically ill over the years with minimal variation or improvement in symptoms.
The patient had reported long standing sinus problems dating back to childhood.
She was diagnosed with chronic sinusitis by the mid-1980s.
She underwent two nasal/sinus surgeries, the first in 1988 which entailed nasal reconstruction and the second in 2003 with creation of antral windows.
This patient continued with chronic sinus symptoms and required nasal/sinus clean out by her Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician about every three months.
In 1999, she underwent endoscopy by her ENT physician at which time fungal cultures were obtained.
These cultures grew a pure growth of Aspergillus niger.

The environmental history obtained in 2012, indicated remote exposure to WDB and moldy environments in a home in which she previously lived as well as a work building.

These exposures would have occurred in the 1960s.
In 2012, a urine mycotoxin assay was sent to RTL which came back positive for OTA at a level of 5.9 parts per billion (ppb).
Aspergillus niger is one of the fungal species known to produce OTA [15,24].

2.2. Cases Two and Three

These cases involve a father (41 y.o.) and daughter (8 y.o.) exposed to mold in a water damaged home as previously reported [25].

They developed numerous health problems following exposure including chronic fungal sinusitis that required surgery [25,26].

Father: The endoscopic sinus surgery performed on the father involved turbinate septoplasty, surgical removal of polyps and debridement of affected sinuses.

MRI and CT scans revealed mucosal thickening of all sinuses, particularly the frontal, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses.
The right maxillary sinus had nodular opacities.
Surgical specimens were sent to RTL to assay for mycotoxins in the specimens.
AT was detected at 1.1 ppb. Culture from the sinus tissue grew Penicillium species.

Daughter: The endoscopic exam revealed that maxillary, ethmoid, sphenoid and frontal sinuses were edematous, there were enlarged turbinates (4+) and deviated septum to the left.
The endoscopic surgery performed on the daughter involved left sphenoidotomy, ethmoidotomy and maxillary sinusotomy.
Surgical specimens sent to RTL demonstrated AT level of 1.2 ppb.
A culture obtained from the sinuses was positive for Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus).

As previously reported both the father and daughter were positive for mycotoxins in the urine and nasal secretions.
The father s specimens showed the following values: urine OTA 18.2 ppb; nasal secretions AT 11.2 ppb and OTA 13 ppb.
The daughter s results were as follows: urine OTA 28 ppb and MT 0.23 ppb; nasal secretions OTA 3.8 ppb and MT 4.68 ppb.
Mycotoxin results for both father and daughter are summarized in

The nose and paranasal sinuses virtually always harbor numerous fungal species.
In a study done at the Mayo Clinic by Ponikau et al., numerous types of fungi were recovered from the sinuses of CRS and normal control patients [27].
Amongst the species recovered, many have the potential to produce mycotoxins including Aspergillus (flavus, niger, fumigatus, versicolor), Chaetomium, Fusarium, Penicilliumand Trichoderma.
This group also found fungal elements (hyphae, destroyed hyphae, conidiae and spores) in 82 of 101 (81%) of the surgical specimens from the sinuses.

, Braun et al. studied 92 CRS patients and 23 healthy control subjects.
Positive cultures for fungi from nasal mucous were found in 91% of CRS patients and 91% of the controls [28].
Fungi and eosinophilic mucin were the markers of sinus involvement in the CRS patients.
The species of fungi were very similar to the Mayo study, including potential toxin producing fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium, Chaetomium, Trichoderma).
Additionally, of 37 surgical cases, 75% had fungal elements (hyphae and spores) on histological examination.

In this paper, the authors state
we conclude that nearly everybody has fungi in his or her nose.

Between the two studies, the total number of different fungal genera identified was 66.
Fungal DNA in the sinuses has been identified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) of nasal brushings [29].
Similar to the studies noted above, potential mycotoxin producing fungal species were found in the nasal brushings with this method of testing.

The species present in the nasal brushings were similar to species found by Q-PCR testing of dust samples in their homes.
In another study of CRS, fungal DNA was present in tissue specimens taken from patients with polyploid CRS who underwent surgery [30].
Two PCR primer sets were utilized; one was panfungal and the other specific for Alternaria.
Fungal DNA was found in all 27 of the CRS patients with both primers. In surgical specimens from healthy controls, the panfungal DNA was positive in 10 of 15 cases but all were negative for the Alternaria DNA.
Studies have also shown that pre-digestion of tissue slides with trypsin before staining dramatically improves identification of fungi by immunofluorescence as does as PCR-DNA analysis [30,31].

Go to:
4. Detection of Mycotoxins in Invasive Aspergillosis: Humans and Animals

Gliotoxin was detected in the sera of cancer patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) ranging from 65 to 785 ng/mL.
It was also detected in the lungs (3976 1662 g/g) and in sera (36.5 30.28 ng/mL) of mice with experimentally induced IA [32].
Wild and domestic animals have been reported with IA.
Gliotoxin was detected in the lungs of wild birds at 0.1 0.45 mg/kg; an infected bovine udder at 9.2 mg/kg; and turkey poults exceeding 6 ppm in infected tissues [33,34,35].
Moreover, aflatoxin B1, B2 and M were detected in the lungs and skin of a patient who died from an invasive infection of A. flavus [36].
Aflatoxin B, ranging from 2.0 to 170 g/g, was recovered in silkworms infected with A. flavus [37].
These observations demonstrate that Aspergillus species produced mycotoxins in the infectious state in humans and animals.
Biofilms may play an important role in that there are up regulated secondary metabolite enzyme pathways in the production of mycotoxins in IA and other mycoses [38,39].
This is discussed further in Section 9.

Go to:
5. Urine Mycotoxins in CRS Patients
In a study of CRS patients (n = 79) by Dennis et al., eight patients underwent urine mycotoxin testing for MT that were sent to RTL [2].
Of the eight specimens tested for MT, seven (87%) were positive.
Lieberman et al. studied 18 patients with CRS.
Mycotoxins were detected in urine assays in four of 18 (22%) at 2X the standard deviation above the limit of detection (all were ochratoxin) [40].

Go to:
6. Detection of Mycotoxins from Nasal Washings, Sera and Tissues Hooper et al. found mycotoxins in nasal washings and other tissues of mold exposure cases [41].
The most frequently recovered mycotoxins were MT, found in 44% of the nasal washing specimens, whereas AT were present in 17% of these cases.

All nasal washings were negative for mycotoxins in the healthy controls (n = 27).
In a study of a family exposed to mold in a water damaged home with AT, OTA and MT in environmental samples,

nasal washings were positive for mycotoxins (AT, OTA, MT) in three of three family members in which nasal washings were tested [25].

All three cases had positive urine mycotoxins, as well.

The specifics of the father and daughter are discussed above in Section 2.
Interestingly, in two of the cases, the MT levels recovered from the nasal washings were higher than the urine levels.
Between the two studies cited above, AT, OTA and MT have all been demonstrated in nasal washings of patients with clinical illnesses and exposure to a WDB and/or mold.
However, mycotoxins were not found in nasal washings of a healthy control population.
The results from studies of direct fungal isolation and mycotoxins are summarized in

Presence of fungi and mycotoxins in healthy individuals, Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients and mold exposure cases.
Other positive findings for the presence of mycotoxins in various tissues include the following:

MT in sera of individuals exposed in a WDB; breast milk, placenta, umbilical cord and tissues (sinus) from family members exposed to a water damaged home [25,42].

Goats that had Stachybotrys chartarum (S. chartarum) spores instilled into their trachea were also positive for MT.
Although MT cleared from the sera in 24 h, mycotoxins were present at 72 h post installation in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes [43].
Since Stachybotrys is not considered a human pathogen, the uptake of the MT probably occurs from the lysis of spores and/or from other particulate matter.
In addition, the detection of MT in lung, spleen and lymph nodes indicates peripheral organ storage has occurred.

Go to:
7. Indoor Microbes and Their Fragments
Mycotoxins (AT, OTA, MT) produced by several species of mold have been identified in water-damaged indoor environments [15,16,17,18,19,21,25].
They have been detected in the sera, urine and tissues of individuals with illness associated with exposure to microbes in these contaminated environments [2,3,14,25,40,41,42].
Whereas species of Aspergillus and Penicillium have been demonstrated in the nasal cavity and sinuses of individuals with CRS, accounting for the probable source of AT and OTA, the detection of MT appears to be somewhat of an enigma.
Trichoderma has been found in the sinuses and does produce MT [27,28].
However, S. chartarum does not germinate and grow in animal tissues [22].
Furthermore, S. chartarum has not been recovered from patients with CRS either by culture or Q-PCR, although it is present in the dust of homes with affected occupants [15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22].
Since, S. chartarum does not readily shed its spores, what are the possible explanations for the detection of its mycotoxins in humans exposed to damp-indoor environments?

We will briefly review the literature regarding the release of ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) by colonies of mold commonly present in damp-indoor spaces.

S. chartarum, other molds and bacteria produce large quantities of fine (nano range) fragments (0.03 to 0.3 microns) when compared to airborne spore counts [44,45,46,47,48,49].
The number of fine fragments is at least 500 times greater than the spore counts [46,47,48].
The respiratory deposition of these fine fungal fragments is 230 times that of spores including the anterior nasal region [46].
Furthermore, the fragments (small particulates) produced by Stachybotrys contain MT while other mold fragments (e.g., Aspergillus and Penicillium) contain antigens and toxins as determined by ELISA testing [19,42,44,45]. Thus, fungal fragments, which contain MT, as well as other mycotoxins and antigens, are inhaled and most likely deposited in the nasal cavity and sinuses.
The fungal fragments are not detected by spore counts, in culture or even Q-PCR [44,45,46,47,48,49].

It has been recommended that the role of the fine particulates shed by mold and bacteria needs to be evaluated for contribution to the health problems of the exposed, rather than relying upon airborne mold spore counts [44,45,46,47,48,49].

These fine particulates may contribute to the colonization of the nose and sinuses which may be a particularly significant issue with S. chartarum.

Santa Fe New Mexico Medicine Lodge Ranch Has Launched! 

I believe specialized rehab facilities are needed for most modern degenerative diseases.
Sheeple must reverse decades of bad attitudes and habits or they will die expensively.  


I have heard her a couple of times on the radio good speaker and good looker.
Probably a native American who learned some traditional medicines that work 
Better than wasting huge $ on modern medicines that just make you sicker.

A very beautiful place high altitude healthy sunny expensive high tax Spanish speaking invaders on Native American land big forest fires.  
I was planning to move there June 2011 was headed home to pack for trip real fast but decided to stay for a meeting instead that dragged on and on so never left.

From: "J. C. JOHN

Old school medical methods


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Medicine Lodge Ranch Has Launched! 
Get your 20% off inside! 
View this email in your browser
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Creation of Medicine Lodge Ranch

I am delighted to announce the launch of Medicine Lodge Ranch, our herbal and natural medicine school located in the heart of New Mexico's Santa Fe National Forest. My family has created this school to share what we've learned about the green world, modern medicine, and how we can weave them together in a way that improves the health of our people, our communities and our planetary home.  
Our logo was created by a dear friend after hearing about the bears that share this land and my deep personal connection to the animal. Many indigenous peoples believe that it was the bear, standing upright on two legs, that brought medicine in the form of herbs, songs, prayers, and teachings to the people.  At Medicine Lodge Ranch we believe that "medicine" is all around us, that all living beings are capable of healing, and that we each carry within us our own unique expertise and innate wisdom.
 
With this ethos at the heart of all we do, Medicine Lodge Ranch is pleased to offer online courses for both health professionals and for those seeking to deepen their knowledge of natural medicine for themselves and their loved ones. We are currently offering Life is Your Best Medicine and our Foundations in Herbal Medicine courses, with Fortify Your Life and Herbal Medicine Making launching in just a few months. We will continue to offer ourweekend retreats held each summer at the ranch. We would be honored for you to join us.

Announcing Our Newest Online Course: 


Use our prelaunch code LIYBMLAUNCH20 to get 20% off 

I've created Life is Your Best Medicine to offer you an opportunity to step back and examine the way you care for yourself. Founded on the belief that our wellness is impacted by the food we eat, the company we keep, the thoughts we think, and our relationship to ourselves, this course will set you on a path to optimize your health and wellbeing across the many facets of your life. This 15-hour course features one-on-one chats with me, lectures on nutrition, herbal medicine, optimizing sleep, fitness, emotional well-being and more, along with downloads for health and healing on the go. Life Is Your Best Medicine empowers you with the tools you need to live a naturally healthy life. I've spent my life building bridges between multigenerational wisdom and science and this course is my way of sharing what I've learned with you. 


In truth, your path is your medicine road, and it is the "everyday stuff" of your life that affects your energy, outlook, joy and wellbeing. I invite you totake your health and happiness into your own hands by enrolling in Life is Your Best Medicine. My hope is that my family can bring healing to yours.













© 2017 Tieraona Low Dog M.D., All rights reserved.
You are receiving this message because you signed up for our mailing list. 


Integrative Medicine Concepts, LLC | P.O. Box 709 | Pecos, NM 87552  

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Friday, September 1, 2017

Healthy Altitude Microbiome Disease too Hot too Cold weather

Cold weather drives you indoors where you will get sick from molds and toxic chemicals in furniture, clothes, carpets, walls, etc.

Hot weather drives you indoors where you will get sick from molds and toxic chemicals in furniture, clothes, carpets, walls, etc.

Hawaii you can get out all day every day of the year and run the fans all night for fresh air.
Or sleep in Tent then roll up and walk all day.

Germs in your nose match germs in your house, pets, mice, rats,… Zoonoses.

Most of your genes are in the microbes growing in you, good and bad.
Help your body defeat disease by growing good microbes in your nose, gut, etc.

High altitude drains my sinuses so good bacteria can grow well.
Plus high is close to sun so skin (solar panel) can produce needed natural chemicals.
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Coastal areas filled with mold.
100 degree Fresno very bad molds growing rampant in buildings that air conditioning circulates into you.

Mold will stick with you for life, perpetual sickness,
Mold grows inside you - sinuses, etc.
Need clean out therapy, immune balance, high altitude.

In Missouri I use fans on all summer nights to bring in oxygen and healthy bacteria in natural air to grow good mold indoors.
Still not good enough, need very high altitude for months to drain sinuses properly.
Cold weather in winter helps - freezes out the water in the air zero humidity.

If you can't run 7 miles and get to work by 8AM then you may have mold growing near your brain leading to Alzheimers and dementia.

Sinuses are close to the brain.
Bugs and germs can penetrate the brain from the sinuses.
Keep your sinuses healthy with lots of good microbes.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3920250/

Chronic Illness Associated with Mold and Mycotoxins:

Naso-Sinus Fungal Biofilm the Culprit?

Exposure to water damaged buildings (WDB) have been associated with numerous health problems that include fungal sinusitis,
abnormalities in T and B cells,
central and peripheral neuropathy,
asthma,
sarcoidosis,
respiratory infections and chronic fatigue

It has been well established that mold and mycotoxins are important constituents of the milieu in WDB that can lead to illness [15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22]. Using a sensitive and specific assay developed by RealTime Laboratories (RTL), we recently published a study linking the presence of aflatoxins (AT), ochratoxin A (OTA) and/or macrocyclic trichothecenes (MT) to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) [14]. The specific methods for these assays have been previously published [14].

A significant number of these chronically ill patients were ill for many years, with an average duration of more than seven years (range 2–36).

Furthermore, over 90% of the patients gave a history of exposure to a WDB, mold or both.

Exposure histories often indicated the WDB/mold exposure occurred many years prior to the mycotoxin testing.
Many of these patients have not had recent or current exposure to a WDB or moldy environment.

Despite the remote history of exposure, these patients had chronic symptoms and the presence of significantly elevated concentrations of AT, OTA and MT in their urine specimens.

The persistence of mycotoxins suggests that there may be an internal source of mold that represents a reservoir for ongoing mold toxins that are excreted in the urine.

Otherwise, one would anticipate that the toxins would have cleared over time.

Herein, we discuss the concept that the nose and sinuses may be major internal reservoirs where the mold is harbored in biofilm communities and generates "internal" mycotoxins.


2.1. Case One

A 71 year old (y.o.) female was first seen in 1989 with a long standing chronic illness that was subsequently diagnosed as CFS.
She had been symptomatic since approximately 1970.
She met the Fukuda criteria for CFS as published in 1994 [23].
She has remained chronically ill over the years with minimal variation or improvement in symptoms.
The patient had reported long standing sinus problems dating back to childhood.
She was diagnosed with chronic sinusitis by the mid-1980s.
She underwent two nasal/sinus surgeries, the first in 1988 which entailed nasal reconstruction and the second in 2003 with creation of antral windows.
This patient continued with chronic sinus symptoms and required nasal/sinus "clean out" by her Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT) physician about every three months.
In 1999, she underwent endoscopy by her ENT physician at which time fungal cultures were obtained.
These cultures grew a pure growth of Aspergillus niger.

The environmental history obtained in 2012, indicated remote exposure to WDB and moldy environments in a home in which she previously lived as well as a work building.

These exposures would have occurred in the 1960s.
In 2012, a urine mycotoxin assay was sent to RTL which came back positive for OTA at a level of 5.9 parts per billion (ppb).
Aspergillus niger is one of the fungal species known to produce OTA [15,24].

2.2. Cases Two and Three

These cases involve a father (41 y.o.) and daughter (8 y.o.) exposed to mold in a water damaged home as previously reported [25].

They developed numerous health problems following exposure including chronic fungal sinusitis that required surgery [25,26].

Father: The endoscopic sinus surgery performed on the father involved turbinate septoplasty, surgical removal of polyps and debridement of affected sinuses.

MRI and CT scans revealed mucosal thickening of all sinuses, particularly the frontal, ethmoid and sphenoid sinuses.
The right maxillary sinus had nodular opacities.
Surgical specimens were sent to RTL to assay for mycotoxins in the specimens.
AT was detected at 1.1 ppb. Culture from the sinus tissue grew Penicillium species.

Daughter: The endoscopic exam revealed that maxillary, ethmoid, sphenoid and frontal sinuses were edematous, there were enlarged turbinates (4+) and deviated septum to the left.
The endoscopic surgery performed on the daughter involved left sphenoidotomy, ethmoidotomy and maxillary sinusotomy.
Surgical specimens sent to RTL demonstrated AT level of 1.2 ppb.
A culture obtained from the sinuses was positive for Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus).

As previously reported both the father and daughter were positive for mycotoxins in the urine and nasal secretions.
The father's specimens showed the following values: urine OTA 18.2 ppb; nasal secretions AT 11.2 ppb and OTA 13 ppb.
The daughter's results were as follows: urine OTA 28 ppb and MT 0.23 ppb; nasal secretions OTA 3.8 ppb and MT 4.68 ppb.
Mycotoxin results for both father and daughter are summarized in

The nose and paranasal sinuses virtually always harbor numerous fungal species.
In a study done at the Mayo Clinic by Ponikau et al., numerous types of fungi were recovered from the sinuses of CRS and normal control patients [27].
Amongst the species recovered, many have the potential to produce mycotoxins including Aspergillus (flavus, niger, fumigatus, versicolor), Chaetomium, Fusarium, Penicilliumand Trichoderma.
This group also found "fungal elements (hyphae, destroyed hyphae, conidiae and spores)" in 82 of 101 (81%) of the surgical specimens from the sinuses.

, Braun et al. studied 92 CRS patients and 23 healthy control subjects.
Positive cultures for fungi from nasal mucous were found in 91% of CRS patients and 91% of the controls [28].
Fungi and eosinophilic mucin were the markers of sinus involvement in the CRS patients.
The species of fungi were very similar to the Mayo study, including potential toxin producing fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium, Chaetomium, Trichoderma).
Additionally, of 37 surgical cases, 75% had fungal elements (hyphae and spores) on histological examination.

In this paper, the authors state
"we conclude that nearly everybody has fungi in his or her nose."

Between the two studies, the total number of different fungal genera identified was 66.
Fungal DNA in the sinuses has been identified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) of nasal brushings [29].
Similar to the studies noted above, potential mycotoxin producing fungal species were found in the nasal brushings with this method of testing.

The species present in the nasal brushings were similar to species found by Q-PCR testing of dust samples in their homes.
In another study of CRS, fungal DNA was present in tissue specimens taken from patients with polyploid CRS who underwent surgery [30].
Two PCR primer sets were utilized; one was panfungal and the other specific for Alternaria.
Fungal DNA was found in all 27 of the CRS patients with both primers. In surgical specimens from healthy controls, the panfungal DNA was positive in 10 of 15 cases but all were negative for the Alternaria DNA.
Studies have also shown that pre-digestion of tissue slides with trypsin before staining dramatically improves identification of fungi by immunofluorescence as does as PCR-DNA analysis [30,31].

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4. Detection of Mycotoxins in Invasive Aspergillosis: Humans and Animals

Gliotoxin was detected in the sera of cancer patients with invasive aspergillosis (IA) ranging from 65 to 785 ng/mL.
It was also detected in the lungs (3976 ± 1662 µg/g) and in sera (36.5 ± 30.28 ng/mL) of mice with experimentally induced IA [32].
Wild and domestic animals have been reported with IA.
Gliotoxin was detected in the lungs of wild birds at 0.1–0.45 mg/kg; an infected bovine udder at 9.2 mg/kg; and turkey poults exceeding 6 ppm in infected tissues [33,34,35].
Moreover, aflatoxin B1, B2 and M were detected in the lungs and skin of a patient who died from an invasive infection of A. flavus [36].
Aflatoxin B, ranging from 2.0 to 170 µg/g, was recovered in silkworms infected with A. flavus [37].
These observations demonstrate that Aspergillus species produced mycotoxins in the infectious state in humans and animals.
Biofilms may play an important role in that there are up regulated secondary metabolite enzyme pathways in the production of mycotoxins in IA and other mycoses [38,39].
This is discussed further in Section 9.

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5. Urine Mycotoxins in CRS Patients
In a study of CRS patients (n = 79) by Dennis et al., eight patients underwent urine mycotoxin testing for MT that were sent to RTL [2].
Of the eight specimens tested for MT, seven (87%) were positive.
Lieberman et al. studied 18 patients with CRS.
Mycotoxins were detected in urine assays in four of 18 (22%) at 2X the standard deviation above the limit of detection (all were ochratoxin) [40].

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6. Detection of Mycotoxins from Nasal Washings, Sera and Tissues
Hooper et al. found mycotoxins in nasal washings and other tissues of mold exposure cases [41].
The most frequently recovered mycotoxins were MT, found in 44% of the nasal washing specimens, whereas AT were present in 17% of these cases.

All nasal washings were negative for mycotoxins in the healthy controls (n = 27).
In a study of a family exposed to mold in a water damaged home with AT, OTA and MT in environmental samples,

nasal washings were positive for mycotoxins (AT, OTA, MT) in three of three family members in which nasal washings were tested [25].

All three cases had positive urine mycotoxins, as well.

The specifics of the father and daughter are discussed above in Section 2.
Interestingly, in two of the cases, the MT levels recovered from the nasal washings were higher than the urine levels.
Between the two studies cited above, AT, OTA and MT have all been demonstrated in nasal washings of patients with clinical illnesses and exposure to a WDB and/or mold.
However, mycotoxins were not found in nasal washings of a healthy control population.
The results from studies of direct fungal isolation and mycotoxins are summarized in

Presence of fungi and mycotoxins in healthy individuals, Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients and mold exposure cases.
Other positive findings for the presence of mycotoxins in various tissues include the following:

MT in sera of individuals exposed in a WDB;
breast milk,
placenta,
umbilical cord and
tissues (sinus) from family members exposed to a water damaged home [25,42].

Goats that had Stachybotrys chartarum (S. chartarum) spores instilled into their trachea were also positive for MT.
Although MT cleared from the sera in 24 h, mycotoxins were present at 72 h post installation in the lungs, spleen and lymph nodes [43].
Since Stachybotrys is not considered a human pathogen, the uptake of the MT probably occurs from the lysis of spores and/or from other particulate matter.
In addition, the detection of MT in lung, spleen and lymph nodes indicates peripheral organ storage has occurred.

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7. Indoor Microbes and Their Fragments
Mycotoxins (AT, OTA, MT) produced by several species of mold have been identified in water-damaged indoor environments [15,16,17,18,19,21,25].
They have been detected in the sera, urine and tissues of individuals with illness associated with exposure to microbes in these contaminated environments [2,3,14,25,40,41,42].
Whereas species of Aspergillus and Penicillium have been demonstrated in the nasal cavity and sinuses of individuals with CRS, accounting for the probable source of AT and OTA, the detection of MT appears to be somewhat of an enigma.
Trichoderma has been found in the sinuses and does produce MT [27,28].
However, S. chartarum does not germinate and grow in animal tissues [22].
Furthermore, S. chartarum has not been recovered from patients with CRS either by culture or Q-PCR, although it is present in the dust of homes with affected occupants [15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22].
Since, S. chartarum does not readily shed its spores, what are the possible explanations for the detection of its mycotoxins in humans exposed to damp-indoor environments?

We will briefly review the literature regarding the release of ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) by colonies of mold commonly present in damp-indoor spaces.

S. chartarum, other molds and bacteria produce large quantities of fine (nano range) fragments (0.03 to 0.3 microns) when compared to airborne spore counts [44,45,46,47,48,49].
The number of fine fragments is at least 500 times greater than the spore counts [46,47,48].
The respiratory deposition of these fine fungal fragments is 230 times that of spores including the anterior nasal region [46].
Furthermore, the fragments (small particulates) produced by Stachybotrys contain MT while other mold fragments (e.g., Aspergillus and Penicillium) contain antigens and toxins as determined by ELISA testing [19,42,44,45]. Thus, fungal fragments, which contain MT, as well as other mycotoxins and antigens, are inhaled and most likely deposited in the nasal cavity and sinuses.
The fungal fragments are not detected by spore counts, in culture or even Q-PCR [44,45,46,47,48,49].

It has been recommended that the role of the fine particulates shed by mold and bacteria needs to be evaluated for contribution to the health problems of the exposed, rather than relying upon airborne mold spore counts [44,45,46,47,48,49].

These fine particulates may contribute to the colonization of the nose and sinuses which may be a particularly significant issue with S. chartarum.

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8. Antifungal Therapy Directed at the Sinuses

In a study of treatment of patients with an intranasal antifungal agent (amphotericin B solution),

Ponikau et al. showed significant improvements in several clinical parameters (symptoms, endoscopic findings and CT scanning of the sinuses) in CRS patients [50,51,52,53].

The authors concluded that reducing the amount of fungal antigen with the antifungal therapy led to clinical improvements.

Varied results from studies of CRS treatments may be due to the fact that CRS can result from infection by bacteria, invasive mold, mold colonization in the presence of biofilms, the extent of sinus involvement (e.g., sphenoid sinuses) or a combination of factors [38,39,52,53].

Surgical debridement is also a common treatment in CRS [1,2,53].

Identifying specific fungal organisms in CRS caused by mold requires specific fungal staining methods to identify hyphae in sinus specimens or identification of mold by Q-PCR [30,31,54,55].

Treatment of fungal CRS may require the use of oral antifungals, as well as intranasal sprays with antifungal activity, depending upon the improvement of individual patient condition [56].

In addition, biofilms, antifungal shelf-life and antifungal resistance must be considered as other variables in effectiveness of treatment [57,58,59,60,61,62,63,64].

A recent study of mold exposed patients (n = 25) with a variety of systemic symptoms was presented [63].

The vast majority of the patients were positive for mycotoxins in the urine. The patients were treated with intranasal amphotericin B with or without systemic antifungals which represented biofilm focused therapy. The patients were monitored before and after treatment. Ninety per cent of the patients had a dramatic decrease in their systemic symptoms, including neurological conditions of tremor, ataxia and vertigo, among others [63].

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9. Role of Biofilm
Biofilms are produced by bacteria and molds and are present in CRS. We will briefly review the key aspects of biofilms and their role in resistance of the microorganisms to antifungal treatment. Often the failure of such treatments lead to surgical intervention [1,2,53,61,64].

Briefly, biofilms are complex surface-associated populations of microorganisms embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM) that possess distinct phenotypes compared to planktonic (free living) organisms. In vitro and in vivoobservations have revealed the morphology and matrix of fungal biofilms [60,61,62,64]. Epithelial cells isolated from sinuses of CRS patients and controls were grown to a confluent monolayer in vitro and then infected with A. fumigatus under static and flow conditions [62]. The formation of the biofilm occurred in five stages: (1) conidial attachment to epithelial cells; (2) hyphal proliferation; (3) extracellular matrix (ECM); (4) hyphal parallel packing and cross linking; and (5) channel/pore formation. Biomass of the film was greater in flow versus static conditions [62]. The architecture of the biofilm was similar to that reported from in vivo CRS conditions as shown in Figure 1 [39]. The fungal ECM consists of polysaccharides (galactomannan, β-d-glucans, lipopolysaccharides), among other extracellular proteins, exotoxins, melanin, hydrophobins, exotoxins, monosaccharides and probably mycotoxins [39,59,64,65,66,67,68]. In this regard, biofilm cells have phenotypes and gene expressions distinct from the planktonic cells. Gene expression of a variety of pathways can be up or down regulated in the biofilm cells when compared to the planktonic phenotypes [38,39,69]. For example, over 3,000 differentially regulated genes have been identified under the two conditions [70]. Some of the genes impart antifungal resistance or up regulation of secondary metabolite pathways [38,39].


Figure 1
Common features of fungal biofilms. Gene expression has been compared between planktonic and biofilm cells of both A. fumigatus and Candida albicans. The major categories of genes up regulated in biofilms are summarize in the blue box. The photos depict ...
Gliotoxin produced by A. fumigatus was detected in an in vitro biofilm model. The proteins of the gliotoxin secondary metabolite pathway were up regulated in the biofilm cultures [38]. The ability of A. fumigatus to form biofilms is considered an important factor in invasive disease [67,68,70,71,72,73]. Thus, the presence of mycotoxins in human tissues and body fluids with invasive mycoses probably occurs. The gliotoxin detected in the sera of cancer patients and in various animals with invasive IA was reviewed in Section 4. Moreover, the detection of aflatoxin B1, B2 and M were detected in the lungs and skin of a patient who died from an IA was also reviewed in Section 4. These observations demonstrate that Aspergillus species produced mycotoxins in the infectious state in humans and animals. Biofilm may be a factor in up regulated secondary metabolite enzyme pathways in the production of mycotoxins in IA and other mycoses.

There is an apparent interaction and possible synergy between bacteria and fungi in biofilm development and survival. In a sheep model, bacteria appear to induce epithelial damage that promotes fungal biofilm formation by A. fumigatus. Co-inoculation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and A. fumigatus into sheep sinuses resulted in an 80% formation of biofilms versus 10% with A. fumigatusinoculation alone [74,75]. Such interaction may provide better surface adherence and ECM formation. In a study by Foreman et al., the microbiology of biofilms was studied in CRS patients using a sensitive fluorescent in situhybridization (FISH) assay [60]. 36 of 50 CRS patients had biofilms compared to 0 of 10 controls. S. aureus was the most common bacterial isolate found. Fungi (using a panfungal probe) were found in 11 of 50 cases. Of these 11 fungal biofilms, seven also demonstrated S. aureus biofilms. In another publication, Haemophilus influenzae produced less severe disease than S. aureus [65]. S. aureus, coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) and other bacteria are frequently found in the sinuses, both in controls and CRS patients [76,77,78,79,80,81,82]. CNS has clearly been demonstrated to produce biofilm which represents a major pathogenic mechanism for these bacteria in certain clinical settings [80,81]. Since S. aureus, CNS and other bacteria frequently occur in the sinuses and commonly form biofilm, this may potentially represent another significant co-pathogen for fungal biofilm formation.

The biofilm confers considerable protection for the organisms including resistance to host defenses and antifungal treatments [38,39,64,83,84]. ECM acts as a physical barrier between the embedded fungal cells and clinically useful antifungal agents, thus leading to ongoing colonization of fungi in the sinuses despite maximal treatment [39,64,83]. Biofilm may allow for chronic persistence of fungi in the nose and sinuses and make treatments more difficult. Although the efficacy of antifungal treatments has been questioned in biofilm, amphotericin B has worked reasonably well in clinical settings and in biofilm models [50,63,84,85]. This may be especially the case for higher concentrations of amphotericin B, which can be used in sinus irrigation since there is no systemic absorption [50,51,52,84]. A combination of amphotericin B with voriconazole and caspofungin was tested on A. fumigatus from early to late stages of colony growth. The combination was effective during early growth, while amphotericin B alone was most effective in the later stages of mycelial growth [84,85].

Given the role of bacterial pathogens in fungal sinus biofilm (e.g., S. aureus), antibacterial therapy may be a helpful adjunct. For example, mupirocin was shown to be effective in the post surgical treatment of recalcitrant CRS [82].

Other agents such as N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and EDTA may assist with disruption of biofilm and enhance the activity of antifungal and antibacterial drugs [86].

Therapies directed at the fungal biofilm may be promising potential interventions for patients with chronic illness secondary to mycotoxins. Examples of such therapies could include agents to disrupt biofilm (e.g., intranasal EDTA) and intranasal antifungal administration (e.g., amphotericin B).

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10. Conclusions
• (1)
Indoor water-damaged environments contain a variety of mold and bacterial species that produce mycotoxins, volatile organic compounds, exotoxins and other metabolites that are present in the dust, furnishings and air [15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22];

• (2)
The occupants of these environments experience chronic adverse health effects that range from upper and lower respiratory disease, central and peripheral neurological deficits, chronic fatigue type illness, among others [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14];

• (3)
Patients that remain chronically ill (e.g., CFS) after exposure to WDB and/or mold, very commonly demonstrate mycotoxins in the urine [14,25,40,41]. Many of these patients have remained chronically ill despite leaving the moldy environment several years previous to the urine testing [14]. This suggested to us that there may well be an internal presence of toxin producing mold. We raised the question, where was the mold located in the body? Herein, we have reviewed the medical literature as it relates to the presence of fungi/mold in the nose and sinuses;

• (4)
We reviewed data for three patients with chronic illness who required surgery for chronic fungal rhinosinusitis. Mycotoxin testing revealed the presence of AT, OTA, and MT in nasal secretions, urine and tissues samples (Table 1 and Table 2) as reported herein and by others [2,3,14,25,40,41,42]. Additionally, fungal organisms were recovered in cultures from the sinuses in these three cases including Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium;

• (5)
Humans and animals with IA have gliotoxin and aflatoxins in their sera and tissues [32,33,34,35,36,37]. These observations suggest that Aspergillus species produce mycotoxins during IA. In addition, after intratracheal administration of Stachybotrys spores, animals were found to have MT in their lungs, spleen and lymph nodes at 72 h after treatment [42]. Also, storage of mycotoxins occurs in variety of tissues [36,41,42];
• (6)

Fungal species can be found in the sinuses of normal, healthy individuals, as well as CRS patients [27,28,55]. Species that have been recovered include those that have the capacity to produce mycotoxins. Additionally, mycotoxins (AT, OTA and MT) have been recovered from nasal washings in patients exposed to a moldy environment, however they were not found in nasal washings of healthy individuals [41];
• (7)

The fungi that are present in the sinuses are in biofilm communities which allows for chronic persistence [39,60,61,65,66,67,68]. This would explain the chronic nature of the fungi/mold in the sinuses and explain the difficulty in treatment [39,64,83]. However, despite that, studies have demonstrated success with treating patients with intranasal amphotericin B. This was shown in both CRS patients and those with chronic illness following mold exposure [50,51,63]. Amphotericin B has been shown to have superior activity in biofilm models as opposed to other antifungal agents [50,51,84];
• (8)

Fungal fragments from 0.03 to 0.3 microns are shed from fungal colonies known to contain antigens and toxins [44,45,46,47,48]. Fine particulates shed by Stachybotrys contain MT [18,19]. The fragments are readily deposited in the nasal cavity [46]. MT have been detected in the sera of occupants exposed to Stachybotrys [42];
• (9)

Prior exposure to toxic mold and mycotoxins may represent an important feature of chronically ill patients such as CFS as well as those with CRS. An internal reservoir of toxin producing mold (e.g., sinuses) that persists in biofilms could produce and release mycotoxins. This model of fungal persistence may help explain these chronic illnesses and represent a potential new understanding of mechanisms of disease that can be treated and/or lessened.

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Conflicts of Interest
Joseph Brewer declares no conflict of interest. Dennis Hooper and Jack Thrasher have served as expert witnesses in mold and mycotoxin exposure litigation.

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