Saturday, December 31, 2016

Junk: Digging Through America's Love Affair with Stuff

https://www.amazon.com/Junk-Digging-Through-Americas-Affair/dp/1613730551#productDescription_secondary_view_div_1483218628822

Friday, December 30, 2016

College food. - The Grossest College Cafeterias | Complex

They work hard to stay off this list.

Picky students with time to complain about anything.

Cheaper faster and better than you can do yourself.

Fancy surrounding.

Smart people to talk to

Http://www.complex.com/pop-culture/2013/09/grossest-college-cafeterias/wells-dining-hall

Useful Stuff | Interstellar Orchard. Daimler Mercedes Benz Van

Gorgeous sunny weather. No allergies or bugs great breathing.

Link below by young female living for years in RV full time travel all over working odd jobs. Many clever tricks and problems to be solved.
If she can do it I can do it.

Daimler Benz makes fine vehicles from tiny Smart Cars to the huge van below that can hold 3 Smart Cars but still be parked and driven as normal.
Looks like an excellent van. Driven by retired couple parked at Best Buy. Whole family could move twice per year to have best weather education jobs and safety.


Http://www.interstellarorchard.com/useful-stuff/

Thursday, December 29, 2016

85-Year-Old Marathoner Is So Fast That Even Scientists Marvel

http://drudgetoday.com/v2/r?n=0&s=3&c=1&pn=Anonymous&u=http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/28/sports/ed-whitlock-marathon-running.html

Sauk Prairie vet to share experiences treating eagles at Eagle Watching Days | Regional news | wiscnews.com

http://www.wiscnews.com/saukprairieeagle/news/local/article_499cd713-6817-53c2-9c31-5e0e86d65f81.html

Your body chemicals forensic science

Study enough chemistry to do all your own medical exams.

754 readings must be optimal for health.

Make big $
help cops catch true criminals instead of locking up innocents causing war on cops black olives matter.

Chemicals matter.

Fun

Like cooking.

Ridiculous allergies huge buildings to examine patients for chemical imbalances easy to prevent.

Addicts do tests on you


Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forensic_science?wprov=sfla1

Your body chemicals forensic science

Study enough chemistry to do all your own medical exams.

754 readings must be optimal for health.

Make big $
help cops catch true criminals instead of locking up innocents causing war on cops black olives matter.

Chemicals matter.

Fun

Like cooking.

Ridiculous allergies huge buildings to examine patients for chemical imbalances easy to prevent.

Addicts do tests on you


Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forensic_science?wprov=sfla1

The Dark Side of Flavored Coffee | Serious Eats

http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2013/02/the-dark-side-of-flavored-coffee-how-flavored-coffee-is-made.html

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

Deluxe moveable home.

Bigger than Benz Smart Car
Ford Transit
Can move 2 college students easily.

Tooth Enamel: Erosion and Restoration

Keep white and strong

Coffee
Tea
Sugar
Stains


Http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tooth-enamel-erosion-restoration

Tweet from Shyama Rose (@pencilsareneat)

Shyama Rose (@pencilsareneat) tweeted at 8:18 PM on Tue, Dec 27, 2016:
2016 https://t.co/E1MLfOYgY0
(https://twitter.com/pencilsareneat/status/813932023513366528?s=02)

Get the official Twitter app at https://twitter.com/download?s=13

move now. SHTF college. sell not buy

Ignore liberal news media ads for buying stuff conspiracy to fleece you and make it hard to move to safety if SHTF
Instead get on ebay and sell everything ASAP before SHTF

Keep a hammock and what you can carry in a backpack and a Daimler Benz Smart Car.

Go to college to learn how to prevent SHTF using diet, exercise, sunshine,…
Or learn where to move to prevent SHTF 
Or where to go under various SHTF scenarios
Especially good medical care in case of stroke, heart attack when minutes matter, life or death.

Enjoy life while growing your brain.
College students have had minimal contact with the grid for generations.
They get kicked out of dorms every few months so cannot carry much.

University libraries loaded with good real books so you don't have to cart books around, just leave on shelf when not reading it.
Millions of books ... you cannot do anything like it at home or electronically.
Free wifi everywhere.
Food everywhere, often very healthy better than what you can do at home and cheaper due to vast quantities buy in bulk.

Talk to people.
Get immediate verbal feedback to nip in the bud your crazy ideas, exorcise internal demons, etc.
Human brain organized to verbally and non-verbally interact in small groups, hunting parties, families, etc. in the same tent.  

To impact the future you must teach people before they turn age 30.
Most learn little past age 20.
If you got nothing to teach then keep taking classes until you do.
Stop conspiracies before they happen.  

College towns are fun and civilized compared to the fat barbarian invaders out in the wilderness, casinos, banks, fat suburban houses,..
Lots of cheap apartments so a Benz Smart Car is all you need to move (they actually have trunks!)

Travel thru the year to the best weather and learning / teaching opportunities.
Not too bad around here year round but 3 months of summer and 3 months of winter is better spent somewhere else.
Pick the best USA has to offer for the season.
I am Native American and belong here, my ancestors lived in tents.
Hammocks are the new fad, students hanging around everywhere - schools, parks, lakes,…  watching movies on wifi, chatting with friends on skype, facebook, twitter, 
I actually did some of this in college and the military and even as a working adult often moving.
Winter here tends to be dry and sunny so daytime feels warm under the sun even if temp is low.
Summer here tends to be cloudy so feels cool because no sun to bake your skin, car, clothes, house…. frequent rain cools off air fast

周凯利

Why were the pixels on many of the old computer monitors green and not some other color? - Quora

https://www.quora.com/Why-were-the-pixels-on-many-of-the-old-computer-monitors-green-and-not-some-other-color

Why were the pixels on many of the old computer monitors green and not some other color? - Quora

https://www.quora.com/Why-were-the-pixels-on-many-of-the-old-computer-monitors-green-and-not-some-other-color

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

disaster SHTF preparation priority #1

#1 move near good medical care.
You will need it unless you shoot yourself dead.

Particularly a good emergency room - Level 1 Trauma center - they do get accredited if they can pass inspection.
Or at least a level 2 or worse as long as it is accredited, on the list.
If you have a chronic condition then move near hospitals and medical schools that are expert in that condition.

Throw away junk so you can move easily and think better.
Take classes on health to learn enough to prevent problems instead of letting doctors practice on you at great expense.
The sooner you get educated the better.
Grow your brain.
Lots of high pay and good pay jobs in medicine.
Sickness is a booming business!
Because sickness pays better than proper cooking and exercise jobs.
Obama wants you sick so he dumps money into medical care instead of high minimum wage for healthy cooks and broccoli.

Make sure your job / insurance gets you into the best hospitals, doctors, etc.
There are lots of quacks and incompetents in the business.
Don't waste your time and money on them.

Some states don't have a good emergency room.
List of accredited Trauma centers all over the net:

>
> ALABAMA
>
>
>
>
> University of Alabama at Birmingham
> Birmingham
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/1/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ALASKA
>
>
>
>
> Alaska Native Medical Center
> Anchorage
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/18/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ARIZONA
>
>
>
>
> Flagstaff Medical Center
> Flagstaff
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/28/11
> *
> Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center
> Phoenix
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/18/11
>
> Maricopa Medical Center
> Phoenix
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/19/11
>
> Maricopa Medical Center
> Phoenix
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 12/19/11
>
> Phoenix Children's Hospital
> Phoenix
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 8/31/12
>
> St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center
> Phoenix
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/20/13
>
> Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn
> Scottsdale
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/27/11
>
> University Medical Center
> Tucson
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/11/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> CALIFORNIA
>
>
>
>
> Mercy San Juan Medical Center
> Carmichael
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/22/12
>
> Arrowhead Regional Medical Center
> Colton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/31/12
>
> Palomar Medical Center
> Escondido
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/6/12
>
> Community Medical Center
> Fresno
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/12/13
>
> Marin General Hospital
> Greenbrae
> Level III Trauma Center
> 7/14/12
>
> Scripps Memorial Hospital
> La Jolla
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/3/12
>
> California Hospital Medical center
> Los Angeles
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/16/14
>
> Cedars-Sinai Medical Center
> Los Angeles
> Level I Trauma Center
> 7/2/12
>
> Children's Hospital of Los Angeles
> Los Angeles
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 6/11/13
>
> LAC + USC Medical Center
> Los Angeles
> Level I Trauma Center
> 7/1/12
>
> Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center
> Los Angeles
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/12/13
>
> St. Francis Medical Center
> Lynwood
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/20/12
>
> Providence Holy Cross Medical Center
> Mission Hills
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/15/14
>
> Mission Regional Medical Center
> Mission Viejo
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/24/11
> *
> Doctors Medical Center
> Modesto
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/9/11
>
> Memorial Medical Center
> Modesto
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/10/11
>
> Northridge Hospital Medical Center
> Northridge
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/24/12
>
> University of California, Irvine Medical Center
> Orange
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/11/12
>
> Sutter Roseville Medical Center
> Roseville
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/1/13
>
> Kaiser Foundation Hospital - South Sacramento
> Sacramento
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/16/13
>
> UC Davis Medical Center
> Sacramento
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/21/12
>
> UC Davis Medical Center
> Sacramento
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/21/12
>
> Rady Children's Hospital
> San Diego
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/26/12
>
> Scripps Mercy Hospital
> San Diego
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/5/12
>
> Sharp Memorial Hospital
> San Diego
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/11/12
>
> University of California San Diego Medical Center
> San Diego
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/10/12
>
> San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center
> San Francisco
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/7/13
>
> Regional Medical Center of San Jose
> San Jose
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/17/13
>
> Santa Clara Valley Medical Center
> San Jose
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/18/13
>
> Santa Clara Valley Medical Center
> San Jose
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/18/13
>
> Western Medical Center
> Santa Ana
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/25/11
> *
> Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital
> Santa Barbara
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/8/11
>
> Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital
> Santa Rosa
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/17/12
>
> Stanford University Medical Center
> Stanford
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/14/13
>
> Stanford University Medical Center
> Stanford
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 5/14/13
>
> LAC/Harbor/UCLA Medical Center
> Torrance
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/9/13
>
> John Muir Medical Center
> Walnut Creek
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/7/13
>
> Henry Mayo NewHall Memorial Hospital
> Valencia
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/23/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> COLORADO
>
>
>
>
> Medical Center of Aurora
> Aurora
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/1/12
>
> The Children's Hospital
> Aurora
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/14/12
>
> Memorial Health System
> Colorado Springs
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/14/12
>
> Penrose-St. Francis Health System
> Colorado Springs
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/18/12
>
> Denver Health Medical Center
> Denver
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/10/12
>
> St. Anthony Central Hospital
> Denver
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/12/12
>
> Swedish Medical Center
> Englewood
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/12/11
>
> Poudre Valley Hospital
> Fort Collins
> Level III Trauma Center
> 2/16/13
>
> St. Mary's Hospital and Medical Center
> Grand Junction
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/2/12
>
> North Colorado Medical Center
> Greeley
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/18/11
>
> Littleton Adventist Hospital
> Littleton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/31/13
>
> Medical Center of the Rockies
> Loveland
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/8/13
>
> Parkview Medical Center
> Pueblo
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/14/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> CONNECTICUT
>
>
>
>
> Bridgeport Hospital
> Bridgeport
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/26/12
>
> Connecticut Children's Medical Center
> Hartford
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 9/8/11
>
> Danbury Hospital
> Danbury
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/27/12
>
> Hartford Hospital
> Hartford
> Level I Trauma Center
> 9/8/11
>
> Saint Francis Medical Center
> Hartford
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/22/12
>
> Hospital of St. Raphael
> New Haven
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/24/12
>
> Yale New Haven Hospital
> New Haven
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/16/13
>
> Yale New Haven Hospital
> New Haven
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/16/13
>
> Norwalk Hospital
> Norwalk
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/8/11
>
> William W. Backus Hospital
> Norwich
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/18/12
>
> Stamford Hospital
> Stamford
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/23/12
>
> Saint Mary's Hospital
> Waterbury
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/29/12
>
> Waterbury Hospital
> Waterbury
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/9/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> DELAWARE
>
>
>
>
> Bayhealth Medical Center - Kent General Hospital
> Dover
> Level III Trauma Center
> 10/27/12
>
> Beebe Medical Center
> Lewes
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/16/11
>
> Christiana Care Health System
> Newark
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/3/12
>
> Bayhealth Medical Center - Milford Memorial Hospital
> Milford
> Level III Trauma Center
> 7/17/11
>
> Nanticoke Memorial Hospital
> Seaford
> Level III Trauma Center
> 6/17/13
>
> Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
> Wilmington
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/4/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
>
>
>
>
> Children's National Medical Center
> Washington
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/2/11
>
> Washington Hospital Center
> Washington
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/17/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> IDAHO
>
>
>
>
> Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center
> Boise
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/17/13
>
> Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center
> Idaho Falls
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/24/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ILLINOIS
>
>
>
>
> Loyola University Medical Center
> Maywood
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/19/12
>
> OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center
> Rockford
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/19/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> INDIANA
>
>
>
>
> Deaconess Hospital
> Evansville
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/30/11
>
> St. Mary's Medical Center
> Evansville
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/3/14
>
> St. Mary's Medical Center
> Evansville
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 8/24/12
>
> Lutheran Hospital
> Fort Wayne
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/3/12
>
> Lutheran Hospital
> Fort Wayne
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 3/3/12
>
> Parkview Hospital
> Fort Wayne
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/12/12
>
> Parkview Hospital
> Fort Wayne
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 6/12/12
>
> Clarian Methodist Hospital
> Indianapolis
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/24/12
>
> Indiana University/Wishard Memorial Hospital
> Indianapolis
> Level I Trauma Center
> 9/21/13
>
> Riley Hospital for Children
> Indianapolis
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 12/14/12
>
> Memorial Hospital of South Bend
> South Bend
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/5/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> IOWA
>
>
>
>
> Blank Children's Hospital
> Des Moines
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 9/11/11
>
> Iowa Methodist Medical Center
> Des Moines
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/11/11
>
> Mercy Medical Center
> Des Moines
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/2/12
>
> University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics
> Iowa City
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 2/2/12
>
> University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics
> Iowa City
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/2/12
>
> Mercy Medical Center
> Sioux City
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/17/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> KANSAS
>
>
>
>
> Promise Regional Medical Center
> Hutchinson
> Level III Trauma Center
> 2/8/14
>
> University of Kansas Hospital
> Kansas City
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/30/12
>
> Overland Park Regional Medical Center
> Overland
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/21/12
>
> Labette Health
> Parsons
> Level III Trauma Center
> 8/27/12
>
> Mt. Carmel Regional Medical Center
> Pittsburg
> Level III Trauma Center
> 5/18/12
>
> Stormont-Vail HealthCare
> Topeka
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/14/12
>
> Via Christi Regional Medical Center
> Wichita
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/9/12
>
> Via Christi Regional Medical Center
> Wichita
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 6/9/12
>
> Wesley Medical Center
> Wichita
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/9/14
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Wesley Medical Center
> Wichita
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 5/9/11
> *
> KENTUCKY
>
>
>
>
> Taylor Regional Hospital
> Campbellsville
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/12/11
>
> Ephraim McDowell Regional Medical Center
> Danville
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/10/12
>
> University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital
> Lexington
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/29/12
>
> University of Kentucky Children's Hospital
> Lexington
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/29/12
>
> University of Louisville Hospital
> Louisville
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/8/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> LOUISIANA
>
>
>
>
> Spirit of Charity Trauma Center (p/k/a LSU Interim Hospital)
> New Orleans
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/21/11
>
> LSU Health Sciences Center - Shreveport
> Shreveport
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/17/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MAINE
>
>
>
>
> Eastern Maine Medical Center
> Bangor
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/16/11
>
> Central Maine Medical Center
> Lewiston
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/11/12
>
> Maine Medical Center
> Portland
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/1/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MASSACHUSETTS
>
>
>
>
> Beverly Hospital
> Beverly
> Level III Trauma Center
> 5/5/12
>
> Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
> Boston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/16/13
>
> Boston Medical Center
> Boston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/6/13
>
> Boston Medical Center
> Boston
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 2/6/13
>
> Brigham & Women's Hospital
> Boston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/17/13
>
> Children's Hospital Boston
> Boston
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 6/10/11
> *
> Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center
> Boston
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 7/9/11
>
> Massachusetts General Hospital
> Boston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/10/13
>
> Massachusetts General Hospital
> Boston
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/10/13
>
> Tufts New England Medical Center
> Boston
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/14/11
>
> Lahey Clinic
> Burlington
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/18/13
>
> Lawrence General Hospital
> Lawrence
> Level III Trauma Center
> 10/28/12
>
> Lowell General Hospital
> Lowell
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/5/12
>
> Anna Jacques Hospital
> Newburyport
> Level III Trauma Center
> 5/1/12
>
> Berkshire Medical Center
> Pittsfield
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/11/13
>
> North Shore Medical Center
> Salem
> Level III Trauma Center
> 7/16/11
>
> Baystate Medical Center
> Springfield
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/6/11
>
> South Shore Hospital
> Weymouth
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/26/11
>
> UMass Memorial Children's Medical Center
> Worcester
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/31/11
>
> UMass Memorial Medical Center
> Worcester
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/31/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MICHIGAN
>
>
>
>
> C. S. Mott Children's Hospital
> Ann Arbor
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 2/2/12
>
> St. Joseph Mercy Hospital
> Ann Arbor (Ypsilanti)
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/19/13
>
> University of Michigan Hospital
> Ann Arbor
> Level I Trauma Center
> 9/16/11
>
> Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
> Dearborn
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/25/13
>
> Children's Hospital of Michigan
> Detroit
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/16/13
>
> Detroit Receiving Hospital
> Detroit
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/26/14
>
> Henry Ford Hospital
> Detroit
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/30/13
>
> Sinai-Grace Hospital
> Detroit
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/5/11
>
> St. John Hospital & Medical Center
> Detroit
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/23/11
>
> St. John Hospital & Medical Center
> Detroit
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/23/11
>
> Botsford General Hospital
> Farmington
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/26/13
>
> Hurley Medical Center
> Flint
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/3/12
>
> Genesys Regional Medical Center
> Grand Blanc
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/30/12
>
> Saint Mary's Mercy Medical Center
> Grand Rapids
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/29/13
>
> Spectrum Health - Butterworth Campus
> Grand Rapids
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/6/12
>
> Spectrum Health - Helen DeVos Children's Hospital
> Grand Rapids
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 3/6/12
>
> Portage Health
> Hancock
> Level III Trauma Center
> 12/11/12
>
> Borgess Medical Center
> Kalamazoo
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/11/13
>
> Bronson Methodist Hospital
> Kalamazoo
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/10/11
>
> Sparrow Hospital
> Lansing
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/26/14
>
> Marquette General Health System
> Marquette
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/10/12
>
> Mount Clemens Regional Medical Center
> Mt. Clemens
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/12/13
>
> POH Regional Medical Center
> Pontiac
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/25/12
>
> Beaumont Hospital
> Royal Oak
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/18/14
>
> Covenant Healthcare
> Saginaw
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/16/12
>
> Covenant Healthcare
> Saginaw
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 12/16/12
>
> St. Mary's of Michigan
> Saginaw
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/26/11
>
> Munson Medical Center
> Traverse City
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/12/11
> *
> Oakwood Southshore Medical Center
> Trenton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/13/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MINNESOTA
>
>
>
>
> Mercy Hospital
> Coon Rapids
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/23/13
>
> St. Luke's Hospital
> Duluth
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/27/12
>
> St. Mary's Medical Center
> Duluth
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/9/12
>
> St. Mary's Medical Center
> Duluth
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/9/12
>
> Immanuel - St. Joseph's Mayo Health System
> Mankato
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/29/12
>
> Hennepin County Medical Center
> Minneapolis
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/26/13
>
> Hennepin County Medical Center
> Minneapolis
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/15/13
>
> University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview
> Minneapolis
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/26/13
>
> North Memorial Medical Center
> Robbinsdale
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/14/14
>
> North Memorial Medical Center
> Robbinsdale
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 3/22/14
>
> Mayo Clinic, Saint Marys Hospital
> Rochester
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/19/12
>
> Saint Marys Hospital - Mayo Eugenio Litta Children's Hospital
> Rochester
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/19/12
>
> St. Cloud Hospital
> St. Cloud
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/31/13
>
> Regions Hospital
> St. Paul
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 5/13/12
>
> Regions Hospital
> St. Paul
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/12/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MISSOURI
>
>
>
>
> University of Missouri Hospital and Clinics
> Columbia
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/6/14
>
> Barnes Jewish Hospital
> St. Louis
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/11/12
>
> Saint Louis University Hospital
> St. Louis
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/29/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> MONTANA
>
>
>
>
> Billings Clinic
> Billings
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/13/13
>
> St. Vincent Healthcare
> Billings
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/28/14
>
> Bozeman Deaconess Hospital
> Bozeman
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/17/11
>
> St. James Healthcare
> Butte
> Level III Trauma Center
> 6/12/11
> *
> Benefis Hospitals
> Great Falls
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/30/13
>
> Kalispell Regional Medical Center
> Kalispell
> Level III Trauma Center
> 3/24/12
>
> Community Medical Center
> Missoula
> Level III Trauma Center
> 10/2/11
>
> Providence HealthServ StPatrick Hospital Health Sci Center
> Missoula
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/13/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NEBRASKA
>
>
>
>
> Saint Francis Medical Center
> Grand Island
> Level III Trauma Center
> 1/9/12
>
> Good Samaritan Hospital
> Kearney
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/23/12
>
> BryanLGH Medical Center West
> Lincoln
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/4/12
>
> Regional West Medical Center
> Scottsbluff
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/4/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NEW HAMPSHIRE
>
>
>
>
> Concord Hospital
> Concord
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/28/13
>
> Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
> Lebanon
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/30/12
>
> Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
> Lebanon
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/30/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NEW JERSEY
>
>
>
>
> AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center
> Atlantic City
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/20/14
>
> Cooper University Hospital
> Camden
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/29/12
>
> Hackensack University Medical Center
> Hackensack
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/17/13
>
> Jersey City Medical Center
> Jersey City
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/12/12
>
> Morristown Memorial Hospital
> Morristown
> Level I Trauma Center
> 9/9/11
>
> Jersey Shore University Medical Center
> Neptune
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/2/13
>
> Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital
> New Brunswick
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/7/12
>
> New Jersey Trauma Center at University Hospital
> Newark
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/15/11
>
> St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center
> Paterson
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/14/12
>
> Capital Health System
> Trenton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/21/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NEW MEXICO
>
>
>
>
> University of New Mexico Hospital
> Albuquerque
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/31/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NEVADA
>
>
>
>
> St. Rose Dominican Hospitals - Siena Campus
> Henderson
> Level III Trauma Center
> 5/14/11
> *
> Sunrise Hospital & Medical Center
> Las Vegas
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/11/11
>
> University Medical Center of Southern Nevada
> Las Vegas
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/30/11
>
> University Medical Center of Southern Nevada
> Las Vegas
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 10/30/11
>
> Renown Regional Medical Center
> Reno
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/11/14
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NORTH CAROLINA
>
>
>
>
> University of North Carolina Hospitals
> Chapel Hill
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/15/11
>
> Carolinas Medical Center
> Charlotte
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/13/13
>
> Duke University Medical Center
> Durham
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/1/12
>
> Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital
> Greensboro
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/4/12
>
> Pitt County Memorial Hospital
> Greenville
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/6/14
>
> Brenner Children's Hospital
> Winston-Salem
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/7/12
>
> Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
> Winston-Salem
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/2/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> NORTH DAKOTA
>
>
>
>
> Medcenter One, Inc.
> Bismarck
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/5/13
>
> St. Alexius Medical Center
> Bismarck
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/27/12
>
> Innovis Health
> Fargo
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/9/13
>
> MeritCare Hospital
> Fargo
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/28/12
>
> Altru Health System
> Grand Forks
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/14/14
>
> Trinity Hospital
> Minot
> Level II Trauma Center
> 8/27/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> OHIO
>
>
>
>
> Akron Children's Hospital
> Akron
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 9/10/12
>
> Akron General Medical Center
> Akron
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/7/12
>
> Summa Health System - Akron City Hospital
> Akron
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/25/13
>
> Southeastern Ohio Regional Medical Center
> Cambridge
> Level III Trauma Center
> 5/5/11
> *
> Aultman Hospital
> Canton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/24/11
>
> Mercy Medical Center
> Canton
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/11/12
>
> Bethesda North Hospital
> Cincinnati
> Level III Trauma Center
> 6/9/12
>
> Cincinnati Children's Hospital
> Cincinnati
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/23/12
>
> The University Hospital
> Cincinnati
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/2/11
> *
> Fairview Hospital
> Cleveland
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/9/12
>
> MetroHealth Medical Center
> Cleveland
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/23/12
>
> MetroHealth Medical Center
> Cleveland
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 1/23/12
>
> Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital
> Cleveland
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/22/12
>
> Nationwide Children's Hospital
> Columbus
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 3/12/13
>
> Grant Medical Center
> Columbus
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/3/12
>
> Mount Carmel West Hospital
> Columbus
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/22/13
>
> Ohio State University Medical Center
> Columbus
> Level I Trauma Center
> 7/15/12
>
> Riverside Methodist Hospital
> Columbus
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/19/13
>
> Children's Medical Center
> Dayton
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 2/12/14
>
> Miami Valley Hospital
> Dayton
> Level I Trauma Center
> 9/7/13
>
> Defiance Regional Medical Center
> Defiance
> Level III Trauma Center
> 10/30/12
>
> Huron Hospital
> East Cleveland
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/29/13
>
> Blanchard Valley Hospital
> Findlay
> Level III Trauma Center
> 1/15/12
>
> Lima Memorial Health System
> Lima
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/13/14
>
> St. Rita's Medical Center
> Lima
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/19/12
>
> MedCentral Health System
> Mansfield
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/9/13
>
> Marietta Memorial Hospital
> Marietta
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/10/12
>
> East Ohio Regional Hospital
> Martins Ferry
> Level III Trauma Center
> 6/26/13
>
> Affinity Medical Center
> Massillon
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/10/13
>
> Hillcrest Hospital
> Mayfield Heights
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/9/11
>
> Southwest General Health Center
> Middleburg Heights
> Level III Trauma Center
> 7/21/12
>
> Atrium Medical Center
> Middletown
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/9/12
>
> Fisher Titus Medical Center
> Norwalk
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/23/12
>
> Mercy St. Charles Hospital
> Oregon
> Level III Trauma Center
> 12/8/12
>
> Robinson Memorial Hospital
> Ravenna
> Level III Trauma Center
> 12/3/13
>
> Firelands Regional Medical Center
> Sandusky
> Level III Trauma Center
> 2/23/13
>
> Flower Hospital
> Sylvania
> Level III Trauma Center
> 4/26/13
>
> The University of Toledo Medical Center
> Toledo
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/30/13
>
> Mercy St. Vincent's Medical Center
> Toledo
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/3/14
>
> The Toledo Hospital
> Toledo
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/11/14
>
> St. Joseph Health Center
> Warren
> Level III Trauma Center
> 3/11/14
>
> Trumbull Memorial Hospital
> Warren
> Level III Trauma Center
> 9/15/11
>
> St. John Medical Center
> Westlake
> Level III Trauma Center
> 3/25/14
>
> Greene Memorial Hospital
> Xenia
> Level III Trauma Center
> 3/12/14
>
> St. Elizabeth Health Center
> Youngstown
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/3/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> OKLAHOMA
>
>
>
>
> Oklahoma University Medical Center
> Oklahoma City
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/5/13
>
> Oklahoma University Medical Center
> Oklahoma City
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/5/13
>
> St. John Medical Center
> Tulsa
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/19/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> OREGON
>
>
>
>
> Legacy Emanuel Hospital
> Portland
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/11/12
>
> Oregon Health & Science University
> Portland
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/22/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> RHODE ISLAND
>
>
>
>
> Rhode Island Hospital
> Providence
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/21/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> SOUTH DAKOTA
>
>
>
>
> Avera Queen of Peace Hospital
> Mitchell
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/3/13
>
> Avera McKennan Hospital
> Sioux Falls
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/28/12
>
> Sanford USD Medical Center
> Sioux Falls
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/29/13
>
> Sanford USD Medical Center
> Sioux Falls
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/29/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> TEXAS
>
>
>
>
> Dell Children's Medical Center of Central Texas
> Austin
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 6/15/12
>
> University Medical Center Brackenridge
> Austin
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/16/12
>
> CHRISTUS Spohn Hospital Corpus Christi - Memorial
> Corpus Christi
> Level II Trauma Center
> 1/8/13
>
> Baylor University Medical Center
> Dallas
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/4/11
>
> Children's Medical Center
> Dallas
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 11/15/13
>
> Methodist Dallas Medical Center
> Dallas
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/22/13
>
> Parkland Hospital and Health System
> Dallas
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/19/11
>
> University Medical Center of El Paso, Thomason Hospital
> El Paso
> Level I Trauma Center
> 8/13/11
>
> Cook Children's Medical Center
> Fort Worth
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/26/13
>
> Harris Methodist Fort Worth Hospital
> Fort Worth
> Level II trauma Center
> 10/28/11
>
> John Peter Smith Hospital
> Fort Worth
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/17/12
>
> University of Texas Medical Branch
> Galveston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 1/10/12
>
> Ben Taub General Hospital
> Houston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/3/12
>
> Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital
> Houston
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 3/2/12
>
> Memorial Hermann Hospital
> Houston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/2/12
>
> Texas Children's Hospital
> Houston
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 8/18/13
>
> Good Shepherd Medical Center
> Longview
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/10/11
>
> Covenant Children's Hospital
> Lubbock
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 12/9/11
>
> Covenant Medical Center
> Lubbock
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/9/11
>
> University Medical Center
> Lubbock
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/5/12
>
> Medical Center of Plano
> Plano
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/13/13
>
> Seton Medical Center Williamson
> Round Rock
> Level II Trauma Center
> 3/8/14
>
> University Health System
> San Antonio
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/17/13
>
> Wilford Hall Medical Center joined Brooke Army Medical Ctr
> San Antonio
> Level I Trauma Center
> 6/6/11
>
> Scott & White Hospital
> Temple
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/17/12
>
> East Texas Medical Center
> Tyler
> Level I Trauma Center
> 2/14/13
>
> Trinity Mother Frances Hospitals and Clinics
> Tyler
> Level II Trauma Center
> 2/15/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> UTAH
>
>
>
>
> Intermountain Medical Center
> Murray
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/10/12
>
> McKay-Dee Hospital
> Ogden
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/19/11
> *
> Ogden Regional Medical Center
> Ogden
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/9/11
>
> Primary Children's Medical Center
> Salt Lake City
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 12/5/12
>
> University of Utah Hospital
> Salt Lake City
> Level I Trauma Center
> 3/5/13
>
> Utah Valley Regional Medical Center
> Provo
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/2/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> VERMONT
>
>
>
>
> Fletcher Allen Health Care
> Burlington
> Level I Trauma Center
> 10/15/13
>
>
>
>
>
>
> VIRGINIA
>
>
>
>
> Inova Fairfax Hospital
> Falls Church
> Level I Trauma Center
> 11/18/11
>
> Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center
> Richmond
> Level I Trauma Center
> 12/9/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> WEST VIRGINIA
>
>
>
>
> Charleston Area Medical Center
> Charleston
> Level I Trauma Center
> 7/17/11
>
> Cabell Huntington Hospital
> Huntington
> Level II Trauma Center
> 7/18/11
>
> WVUH - East City Hospital
> Martinsburg
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/10/11
>
> West Virginia University Hospitals, Inc.
> Morgantown
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/29/12
>
> West Virginia University Hospitals, Inc.
> Morgantown
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/29/12
>
> Camden-Clark Memorial Hospital
> Parkersburg
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/5/11
>
> St. Joseph's Hospital
> Parkersburg
> Level III Trauma Center
> 11/4/11
>
> Wheeling Hospital
> Wheeling
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/17/14
>
>
>
>
>
>
> WISCONSIN
>
>
>
>
> Luther Midelfort Hospital
> Eau Claire
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/19/11
>
> Aurora BayCare Medical Center
> Green Bay
> Level II Trauma Center
> 9/7/13
>
> St. Vincent Hospital
> Green Bay
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/5/11
>
> Mercy Hospital
> Janesville
> Level II Trauma Center
> 12/7/12
>
> Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center
> La Crosse
> Level II Trauma Center
> 11/2/13
>
> American Family Children's Hospital at the University of WI
> Madison
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 5/1/13
>
> University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics
> Madison
> Level I Trauma Center
> 5/1/13
>
> Saint Joseph's Hospital
> Marshfield
> Level II Trauma Center
> 4/30/13
>
> Saint Joseph's Hospital
> Marshfield
> Level II Pediatric Trauma Center
> 4/30/13
>
> Children's Hospital of Wisconsin
> Milwaukee
> Level I Pediatric Trauma Center
> 5/2/13
>
> Froedtert Hospital
> Milwaukee
> Level I Trauma Center
> 4/24/13
>
> Theda Clark Medical Center
> Neenah
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/11/13
>
> Aspirus Wausau Hospital
> Wausau
> Level II Trauma Center
> 10/6/11
>
>
>
>
>
>
> WYOMING
>
>
>
>
> Cheyenne Regional Medical Center
> Cheyenne
> Level II Trauma Center
> 5/20/12
>
>
>
>
>
>
> GERMANY
>
>
>
>
> Landstuhl Regional Medical Center
> Landstuhl
> Level II Trauma Center
> 6/14/13
>
周凯利

Outrageous invasion of your privacy Facebook

https://www.propublica.org/article/facebook-doesnt-tell-users-everything-it-really-knows-about-them

TSA folly. Waste $ tax

https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2016/12/security_risks_12.html

Minimum wage

There is not a single state where working 40 hours/week at the minimum wage is enough to afford a one-bedroom apartment.

That's an outrage!

https://t.co/EcUUiRYjP9
(https://twitter.com/SenSanders/status/813559276538970112?s=02)

Get the official Twitter app at https://twitter.com/download?s=13

3 Ways to Patch a Leak in an Air Mattress - wikiHow

https://www.google.com/amp/m.wikihow.com/Patch-a-Leak-in-an-Air-Mattress%3Famp%3D1?client=ms-android-boost-us

Move south

https://youtu.be/PuHbUqx_xy4

Monday, December 26, 2016

USA 3rd world short life

Move to the French Riviera.
Wine & Cheese


周凯利

German Homeland Europe’s future — Fire Merkel

Germans need a homeland too.
Remove the alien invaders from Germany.
No country is safe with millions of illegals roaming within its borders.
Build more walls.
Ban all foreign travel until the end of hostilities.

Issue guns to all legal adult Germans.
Shoot errant trucks.
(That is quite a problem when truck going away from you or even from the side).
Maybe issue a hammer to break windshield so can jump into the cab and clobber the driver.
Self driving trucks may help but they can be hacked by terrorists and harder to shoot dead than human driven trucks.
Good solid walls with no travel or wired communications the best idea.
All races return to your homeland.
End multiculturalism and environmental destruction - protect what you got traditional culture.


周凯利

> On Dec 25, 2016, at 9:30 AM, Ron wrote:
>
> Good article. When western European countries turned over their guns for high taxes there was a social contract made that governments would protect and care for them cradle to grave. That contract has been broken. Despite the euro likely crashing well below the dollar the new immigrants will not be working in an export economy. Europe will collapse before the US. Socialism is collapsing worldwide.
>
> Merry Christmas,
>
> Ron
>
> On 24 December 2016 at 22:58, Lothar wrote:
> http://www.wnd.com/2016/12/europes-future-merkel-or-le-pen/
>
> Merkel or Le Pen ?
> Pat Buchanan: 'Open borders are Eurail passes for Islamist terrorists'
>
> PATRICK J. BUCHANAN
> The terrorist who hijacked a truck in Berlin and ran over and killed 12 people, maiming and wounding 48 more, in that massacre in the Christmas market has done more damage than he could imagine.
>
> Marine Le Pen of France's National Front, leading candidate for the presidency in 2017, declaimed:

> "How many more people must die at the hands of Islamic extremists before our governments close our porous borders and stop taking in thousands of illegal immigrants?"
>
> Geert Wilders, the Party for Freedom front-runner for prime minister of Holland, echoed Le Pen:

> "They hate and kill us. And nobody protects us. Our leaders betray us. We need a political revolution.
>
> "Islamic immigration is an invasion," he went on, "an existential problem that will replace our people [and] erase our culture."
>
> "These are Merkel's dead," tweeted Marcus Pretzell of the far-right Alternative for Germany about the victims in the Christmas mart.
>
> Nicholas Farage, who led the campaign for British secession from the EU, called the Christmas massacre "the Merkel legacy."
>
> Europe's populist right is laying this act of Islamist savagery at the feet of Merkel for her having opened Germany in 2015 to a million migrants and refugees from Syria and the Middle East wars.
>
> mobs of migrants went about molesting and raping German girls in Cologne last New Year's Eve.
>
> The cruel experiences of the recent past, and common sense, dictate that open borders are Eurail passes for Islamist terrorists, who are anxious to come and kill us in the West. We have to deal with the world as it is, not as we would wish it to be.
>
> In our time, there has taken place, is taking place, an Islamic awakening. Of 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide, hundreds of millions accept strict Shariah law about how to deal with apostasy and infidels.
>
> Scores of millions in the Middle East wish to drive the West out of their world. Thousands are willing to depart and come to Europe to terrorize our societies. They see themselves at war with us,[when western bombs are falling on them, making millions of them to refugees] as their ancestors were at war with the Christian world for 1,000 years.
>
> Only liberal ideology calls for America and Europe to bring into their home countries endless numbers of "migrants",[bombed out refugees] without being overly concerned about who they are, whence they come or what they believe. (Maybe revenge ?)
>
> Right-wing and anti-immigrant parties are succeeding in Europe for a simple reason. Mainstream parties are failing in the first duty of government – to protect the safety and security of the people.
>
>
> Lothar
> Merry Christmas
>

Vitamin D3 cod liver oil Re: sun helps heart, blood flow. Nitric Oxide

Vitamin D3 is made by the skin so is the best form of D that works better in the body.
I use cod liver oil because it is very high in D3 and also has the best fish oil Omega 3/6 balance.
Take more or less as needed.
Feel out optimal dosage.
Not fully satisfactory as cod liver oil has too much Vitamin A that should come from carrot juice carotenoids per Dr. Weil.

Sun + Vitamin D + sulfur: the skin sulfates the vitamin D making it water soluble so it can be transported quickly by the blood to all tissues where it is needed.
Cod liver oil alone cannot do that without sun on skin.
Sun also can sulfate cholesterol so it gets where it is needed - every cell in the body.
Supplements are not a substitute for sunshine.
You can still get sick and die from sun deficiency.

Sunshine also has the right kind of radiation for visual health, and numerous biochemical reactions through the entire human body.
Nowadays people suffer severe sun deficiency diseases as most have moved far from the equator where they lived for millions of years.
Indoors on TV, games, etc. Multitude of modern diseases.
I am just learning about light and electromagnetic radiation effects on the body.

Because of incessant rain and clouds it is hard to get enough sun around here.
One reason I want to move to Lubbock Texas 3333 foot elevation about right, same as Yerevan Armenia, etc.
Phoenix Arizona is low elevation with 100 days over 100 degrees annually with many low temperatures barely below 100 degrees!.
Flagstaff Arizona is high altitude but is very cold and snowy with nights near freezing even in the summer.
Far south and high altitude is the way to get closer to the sun for more of the year.
Arizona is far south and high altitude, as is much of New Mexico and some of California.
Lubbock Texas has other advantages include huge oil money, zero income tax, etc.

D3 is what people mean by Vitamin D.
It is hard to find D2 even if you want to buy it.
D2 is cheaper so it is sometimes used industrially in milk, etc.
D3 may be diluted with D2.
Or D2 fraud substituted for D3.
There is a huge amount of fraud and errors in the supplement industry.

My health education is stalled around here because of the class/lab/people setup and too much work.
One needs to be able to do lots of lab tests on oneself.
Go for optimal levels of everything.
Trying stuff and waiting to see if you get sick or die is time consuming and counter productive.
Much can be tested by high school students, just follow the protocols.
A few good college classes and you can test anything and learn a lot about what should be tested.


周凯利

> On Dec 25, 2016, at 10:05 AM, Ron wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
> You are painting with a broad brush with respect to Vitamin D. The literature distinguishes between D3 and D2. D3 is readily used by the body and is absorbed by every cell in the body. Large sample studies have shown D3 at blood levels of 75 ng/ml show a decreased rate of return of breast cancer of 60%. Other impressive results in colorectal and pancreatic cancers as well. D3 appears to control the replication of cells at the cellular level. I personally take 15,000 IU of D3 and have done so for several years.
>
> Ron
>
> On 25 December 2016 at 07:01, joe wrote:
> Blood is thick.
> Blood cannot flow without lots of Nitric Oxide (NO) that dilates blood vessels.
> (Red Blood Cells actually bigger than capillaries so no blood flow without NO).
>
> Sun makes nitric oxide in your skin.
> Nitric oxide is in vegetables that you can eat.
> Nitric oxide lowers blood pressure, makes blood flow.
> Nitric oxide prevents heart attacks, strokes, brain diseases, all sorts of diseases.
> You must have circulating blood even while asleep.
> Also walk all day when awake will help but walking is no substitute for sunshine.
> Hawaii people live longer than any other state.
> Sunny state people live longer.
> Rich people live longer.
> Educated people live longer.
>
> Wavelength of light is critical.
> Different latitudes get different wavelengths of light at different types of the year.
> Eat vegetables when sun is weak.
>
> Talk online:
>
> http://www.ted.com/talks/richard_weller_could_the_sun_be_good_for_your_heart?language=en
>
> Our bodies get Vitamin D from the sun.
> Dermatologist Richard Weller suggests, sunlight may confer another surprising benefit too.
> nitric oxide, a chemical transmitter stored in huge reserves in the skin, can be released by UV light, to great benefit for blood pressure and the cardiovascular system.
>
> What does it mean? Well, it might begin to explain why Scots get sick more than Australians ...
>
> ------
> Now, sunlight, of course, comes into this.
> And vitamin D has had a great deal of press, and a lot of people get concerned about it.
> And we need vitamin D. It's now a requirement that children have a certain amount.
> My grandmother grew up in Glasgow, back in the 1920s and '30s when rickets was a real problem and cod liver oil was brought in.
> And that really prevented the rickets that used to be common in this city.
> And I as a child was fed cod liver oil by my grandmother.
>
> 2:53
> But an association: The higher people's blood levels of vitamin D are, the less heart disease they have, the less cancer.
> There seems to be a lot of data suggesting that vitamin D is very good for you.
> And it is, to prevent rickets and so on.
> But if you give people vitamin D supplements, you don't change that high rate of heart disease.
> And the evidence for it preventing cancers is not yet great.
> So what I'm going to suggest is that vitamin D is not the only story in town.
> It's not the only reason preventing heart disease.
> High vitamin D levels, I think, are a marker for sunlight exposure, and sunlight exposure, in methods I'm going to show, is good for heart disease.
>
> 3:35
> Anyway, I came back from Australia, and despite the obvious risks to my health, I moved to Aberdeen. (Laughter)
> Now, in Aberdeen, I started my dermatology training.
> But I also became interested in research, and in particular I became interested in this substance, nitric oxide.
> Now these three guys up here, Furchgott, Ignarro and Murad, won the Nobel Prize for medicine back in 1998.
> And they were the first people to describe this new chemical transmitter, nitric oxide.
> What nitric oxide does is it dilates blood vessels, so it lowers your blood pressure.
> It also dilates the coronary arteries, so it stops angina.
>
> 4:12
> And what was remarkable about it was in the past when we think of chemical messengers within the body, we thought of complicated things like estrogen and insulin, or nerve transmission.
> Very complex processes with very complex chemicals that fit into very complex receptors.
> And here's this incredibly simple molecule, a nitrogen and an oxygen that are stuck together, and yet these are hugely important for [unclear] our low blood pressure, for neurotransmission, for many, many things,but particularly cardiovascular health.
>
> 4:44
> And I started doing research, and we found, very excitingly, that the skin produces nitric oxide.
> So it's not just in the cardiovascular system it arises.
> It arises in the skin.
> Well, having found that and published that, I thought, well, what's it doing?
> How do you have low blood pressure in your skin? It's not the heart.
> What do you do?
>
> 5:03
> So I went off to the United States, as many people do if they're going to do research, and I spent a few years in Pittsburgh.
> And I was interested in these really complex systems.
> We thought that maybe nitric oxide affected cell death, and how cells survive, and their resistance to other things.
> And I first off started work in cell culture, growing cells, and then I was using knockout mouse models -- mice that couldn't make the gene.
> We worked out a mechanism, which -- NO was helping cells survive.
>
> 5:31
> And I then moved back to Edinburgh. And in Edinburgh, the experimental animal we use is the medical student.
> It's a species close to human, with several advantages over mice:
> They're free, you don't shave them, they feed themselves, and nobody pickets your office saying, "Save the lab medical student." So they're really an ideal model.
>
> 5:53
> But what we found was that we couldn't reproduce in man the data we had shown in mice.
> It seemed we couldn't turn off the production of nitric oxide in the skin of humans.
> We put on creams that blocked the enzyme that made it, we injected things.
> We couldn't turn off the nitric oxide.
>
> 6:13
> And the reason for this, it turned out, after two or three years' work, was that in the skin we have huge stores not of nitric oxide, because nitric oxide is a gas, and it's released -- (Poof!) -- and in a few seconds it's away, but it can be turned into these forms of nitric oxide -- nitrate, NO3; nitrite, NO2; nitrosothiols.
> And these are more stable, and your skin has got really large stores of NO.
> And we then thought to ourselves, with those big stores, I wonder if sunlight might activate those stores and release them from the skin, where the stores are about 10 times as big as what's in the circulation. \
> Could the sun activate those stores into the circulation, and there in the circulation do its good things for your cardiovascular system?
>
> 6:58
> Well, I'm an experimental dermatologist, so what we did was we thought we'd have to expose our experimental animals to sunlight.
> And so what we did was we took a bunch of volunteers and we exposed them to ultraviolet light.
> Now, what we were careful to do was, vitamin D is made by ultraviolet B rays and we wanted to separate our story from the vitamin D story. \
> So we used ultraviolet A, which doesn't make vitamin D.
>
> 7:28
> When we put people under a lamp for the equivalent of about 30 minutes of sunshine in summer in Edinburgh, what we produced was, we produced a rise in circulating nitric oxide. \
> So we put patients with these subjects under the UV, and their NO levels do go up, and their blood pressure goes down.
> Not by much, as an individual level, but enough at a population level to shift the rates of heart disease in a whole population.
> And when we shone UV at them, or when we warmed them up to the same level as the lamps, but didn't actually let the rays hit the skin, this didn't happen.
> So this seems to be a feature of ultraviolet rays hitting the skin.
>
> 8:09
> Now, we're still collecting data.
> A few good things here: This appeared to be more marked in older people.
> I'm not sure exactly how much.
> But certainly in people older than my wife, this appears to be a more marked effect.
> And the other thing I should mention was there was no change in vitamin D.
> This is separate from vitamin D.
> So vitamin D is good for you -- it stops rickets, it prevents calcium metabolism, important stuff.
> But this is a separate mechanism from vitamin D.
>
> 8:40
> Now, one of the problems with looking at blood pressure is your body does everything it can to keep your blood pressure at the same place.
> If your leg is chopped off and you lose blood, your body will clamp down, increase the heart rate,do everything it can to keep your blood pressure up.
> That is an absolutely fundamental physiological principle.
>
> 8:56
> So what we've next done is we've moved on to looking at blood vessel dilatation.
> So we've measured -- this is again, notice no tail and hairless, this is a medical student.
> In the arm, you can measure blood flow in the arm by how much it swells up as some blood flows into it.
> And what we've shown is that doing a sham irradiation -- this is the thick line here -- this is shining UV on the arm so it warms upbut keeping it covered so the rays don't hit the skin.
> There is no change in blood flow, in dilatation of the blood vessels.
> But the active irradiation, during the UV and for an hour after it, there is dilation of the blood vessels.
> This is the mechanism by which you lower blood pressure, by which you dilate the coronary arteries also, to let the blood be supplied with the heart.
> So here, further data that ultraviolet -- that's sunlight -- has benefits on the blood flow and the cardiovascular system.
>
> 9:51
> So we thought we'd just kind of model —
> Different amounts of UV hit different parts of the Earth at different times of year, so you can actually work out those stores of nitric oxide -- the nitrates, nitrites, nitrosothiols in the skin -- cleave to release NO.
> Different wavelengths of light have different activities of doing that.
> So you can look at the wavelengths of light that do that.
> And you can look —
> So, if you live on the equator, the sun comes straight overhead, it comes through a very thin bit of atmosphere.
> In winter or summer, it's the same amount of light.
> If you live up here, in summer the sun is coming fairly directly down, but in winter it's coming through a huge amount of atmosphere, and much of the ultraviolet is weeded out, and the range of wavelengths that hit the Earth are different from summer to winter.
> So what you can do is you can multiply those data by the NO that's released and you can calculate how much nitric oxide would be released from the skin into the circulation.
>
> 10:50
> Now, if you're on the equator here -- that's these two lines here, the red line and the purple line -- the amount of nitric oxide that's released is the area under the curve,it's the area in this space here.
> So if you're on the equator, December or June, you've got masses of NO being released from the skin.
> So Ventura is in southern California.
> In summer, you might as well be at the equator.
> It's great.
> Lots of NO is released.
> Ventura mid-winter, well, there's still a decent amount.
> Edinburgh Scotland in summer, the area beneath the curve is pretty good, but
> Edinburgh Scotland in winter, the amount of NO that can be released is next to nothing, tiny amounts.
>
> 11:30
> So what do we think?
> We're still working at this story, we're still developing it, we're still expanding it.
> We think it's very important.
> We think it probably accounts for a lot of the north-south health divide within Britain, It's of relevance to us.
> We think that the skin -- well, we know that the skin has got very large stores of nitric oxide as these various other forms.
> We suspect a lot of these come from diet, green leafy vegetables, beetroot, lettuce has a lot of these nitric oxides that we think go to the skin.
> We think they're then stored in the skin, and we think the sunlight releases this where it has generally beneficial effects.
>
> 12:04
> I'm a dermatologist.
> My day job is saying to people, "You've got skin cancer, it's caused by sunlight, don't go in the sun."
> I actually think a far more important message is that there are benefits as well as risks to sunlight.
> Yes, sunlight is the major alterable risk factor for skin cancer, but deaths from heart disease are a hundred times higher than deaths from skin cancer.
> And I think that we need to be more aware of, and we need to find the risk-benefit ratio.
> How much sunlight is safe, and how can we finesse this best for our general health?
>
> <death age adjusted death rates m6332qsf.gif>
>
>

Sunday, December 25, 2016

Flagstaff Medical Center high rank in lungs and diabetes.

Mayo clinic in Phoenix if you need more.   

Clean air high altitude sun

Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism

More details

Https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Animal+Spirits%3A_How_Human_Psychology_Drives_the_Economy%2C_and_Why_It_Matters_for_Global_Capitalism?wprov=sfla1

Akerlof, G.A. and Shiller, R.J.: Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why It Matters for Global Capitalism. (Princeton)

Ivy League Nobel Prize winner work.

The sheeple herd needs big brother shepherd as Keynes prescribed decades ago.

Trump to the rescue


Http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8967.html

What is the most important and recent criticism on CAPM (Capital Asset Pricing Model)? - ResearchGate

https://www.researchgate.net/post/What_is_the_most_important_and_recent_criticism_on_CAPM_Capital_Asset_Pricing_Model

sun helps heart, blood flow. Nitric Oxide

Blood is thick.
Blood cannot flow without lots of Nitric Oxide (NO) that dilates blood vessels.
(Red Blood Cells actually bigger than capillaries so no blood flow without NO).

Sun makes nitric oxide in your skin.
Nitric oxide is in vegetables that you can eat.
Nitric oxide lowers blood pressure, makes blood flow.
Nitric oxide prevents heart attacks, strokes, brain diseases, all sorts of diseases.
You must have circulating blood even while asleep.
Also walk all day when awake will help but walking is no substitute for sunshine.  
Hawaii people live longer than any other state.  
Sunny state people live longer.
Rich people live longer.
Educated people live longer.

Wavelength of light is critical.
Different latitudes get different wavelengths of light at different types of the year.
Eat vegetables when sun is weak.

Talk online:


Our bodies get Vitamin D from the sun.
Dermatologist Richard Weller suggests, sunlight may confer another surprising benefit too. 
 nitric oxide, a chemical transmitter stored in huge reserves in the skin, can be released by UV light, to great benefit for blood pressure and the cardiovascular system. 

What does it mean? Well, it might begin to explain why Scots get sick more than Australians ...

------
Now, sunlight, of course, comes into this. 
And vitamin D has had a great deal of press, and a lot of people get concerned about it. 
And we need vitamin D. It's now a requirement that children have a certain amount. 
My grandmother grew up in Glasgow, back in the 1920s and '30s when rickets was a real problem and cod liver oil was brought in.
 And that really prevented the rickets that used to be common in this city. 
And I as a child was fed cod liver oil by my grandmother.

2:53
But an association: The higher people's blood levels of vitamin D are, the less heart disease they have, the less cancer. 
There seems to be a lot of data suggesting that vitamin D is very good for you. 
And it is, to prevent rickets and so on. 
But if you give people vitamin D supplements, you don't change that high rate of heart disease.
And the evidence for it preventing cancers is not yet great. 
So what I'm going to suggest is that vitamin D is not the only story in town. 
It's not the only reason preventing heart disease. 
High vitamin D levels, I think, are a marker for sunlight exposure, and sunlight exposure, in methods I'm going to show, is good for heart disease.

3:35
Anyway, I came back from Australia, and despite the obvious risks to my health, I moved to Aberdeen. (Laughter) 
Now, in Aberdeen, I started my dermatology training.
But I also became interested in research, and in particular I became interested in this substance, nitric oxide. 
Now these three guys up here, Furchgott, Ignarro and Murad, won the Nobel Prize for medicine back in 1998. 
And they were the first people to describe this new chemical transmitter, nitric oxide. 
What nitric oxide does is it dilates blood vessels, so it lowers your blood pressure. 
It also dilates the coronary arteries, so it stops angina.

4:12
And what was remarkable about it was in the past when we think of chemical messengers within the body, we thought of complicated things like estrogen and insulin, or nerve transmission. 
Very complex processes with very complex chemicals that fit into very complex receptors. 
And here's this incredibly simple molecule, a nitrogen and an oxygen that are stuck together, and yet these are hugely important for [unclear] our low blood pressure, for neurotransmission, for many, many things,but particularly cardiovascular health.

4:44
And I started doing research, and we found, very excitingly, that the skin produces nitric oxide. 
So it's not just in the cardiovascular system it arises. 
It arises in the skin. 
Well, having found that and published that, I thought, well, what's it doing?
How do you have low blood pressure in your skin? It's not the heart. 
What do you do?

5:03
So I went off to the United States, as many people do if they're going to do research, and I spent a few years in Pittsburgh. 
And I was interested in these really complex systems. 
We thought that maybe nitric oxide affected cell death, and how cells survive, and their resistance to other things.
 And I first off started work in cell culture, growing cells, and then I was using knockout mouse models -- mice that couldn't make the gene.
 We worked out a mechanism, which -- NO was helping cells survive.

5:31
And I then moved back to Edinburgh. And in Edinburgh, the experimental animal we use is the medical student. 
It's a species close to human, with several advantages over mice: 
They're free, you don't shave them, they feed themselves, and nobody pickets your office saying, "Save the lab medical student." So they're really an ideal model.

5:53
But what we found was that we couldn't reproduce in man the data we had shown in mice. 
It seemed we couldn't turn off the production of nitric oxide in the skin of humans. 
We put on creams that blocked the enzyme that made it, we injected things. 
We couldn't turn off the nitric oxide.

6:13
And the reason for this, it turned out, after two or three years' work, was that in the skin we have huge stores not of nitric oxide, because nitric oxide is a gas, and it's released -- (Poof!) -- and in a few seconds it's away, but it can be turned into these forms of nitric oxide -- nitrate, NO3; nitrite, NO2; nitrosothiols. 
And these are more stable, and your skin has got really large stores of NO. 
And we then thought to ourselves, with those big stores, I wonder if sunlight might activate those stores and release them from the skin, where the stores are about 10 times as big as what's in the circulation. \
Could the sun activate those stores into the circulation, and there in the circulation do its good things for your cardiovascular system?

6:58
Well, I'm an experimental dermatologist, so what we did was we thought we'd have to expose our experimental animals to sunlight. 
And so what we did was we took a bunch of volunteers and we exposed them to ultraviolet light. 
Now, what we were careful to do was, vitamin D is made by ultraviolet B rays and we wanted to separate our story from the vitamin D story. \
So we used ultraviolet A, which doesn't make vitamin D.

7:28
When we put people under a lamp for the equivalent of about 30 minutes of sunshine in summer in Edinburgh, what we produced was, we produced a rise in circulating nitric oxide. \
So we put patients with these subjects under the UV, and their NO levels do go up, and their blood pressure goes down. 
Not by much, as an individual level, but enough at a population level to shift the rates of heart disease in a whole population.
 And when we shone UV at them, or when we warmed them up to the same level as the lamps, but didn't actually let the rays hit the skin, this didn't happen. 
So this seems to be a feature of ultraviolet rays hitting the skin.

8:09
Now, we're still collecting data. 
A few good things here: This appeared to be more marked in older people. 
I'm not sure exactly how much.
But certainly in people older than my wife, this appears to be a more marked effect. 
And the other thing I should mention was there was no change in vitamin D. 
This is separate from vitamin D. 
So vitamin D is good for you -- it stops rickets, it prevents calcium metabolism, important stuff. 
But this is a separate mechanism from vitamin D.

8:40
Now, one of the problems with looking at blood pressure is your body does everything it can to keep your blood pressure at the same place. 
If your leg is chopped off and you lose blood, your body will clamp down, increase the heart rate,do everything it can to keep your blood pressure up. 
That is an absolutely fundamental physiological principle.

8:56
So what we've next done is we've moved on to looking at blood vessel dilatation.
So we've measured -- this is again, notice no tail and hairless, this is a medical student. 
In the arm, you can measure blood flow in the arm by how much it swells up as some blood flows into it. 
And what we've shown is that doing a sham irradiation -- this is the thick line here -- this is shining UV on the arm so it warms upbut keeping it covered so the rays don't hit the skin. 
There is no change in blood flow, in dilatation of the blood vessels. 
But the active irradiation, during the UV and for an hour after it, there is dilation of the blood vessels. 
This is the mechanism by which you lower blood pressure, by which you dilate the coronary arteries also, to let the blood be supplied with the heart. 
So here, further data that ultraviolet -- that's sunlight -- has benefits on the blood flow and the cardiovascular system.

9:51
So we thought we'd just kind of model — 
Different amounts of UV hit different parts of the Earth at different times of year, so you can actually work out those stores of nitric oxide -- the nitrates, nitrites, nitrosothiols in the skin -- cleave to release NO.
Different wavelengths of light have different activities of doing that. 
So you can look at the wavelengths of light that do that. 
And you can look — 
So, if you live on the equator, the sun comes straight overhead, it comes through a very thin bit of atmosphere. 
In winter or summer, it's the same amount of light. 
If you live up here, in summer the sun is coming fairly directly down, but in winter it's coming through a huge amount of atmosphere, and much of the ultraviolet is weeded out, and the range of wavelengths that hit the Earth are different from summer to winter. 
So what you can do is you can multiply those data by the NO that's released and you can calculate how much nitric oxide would be released from the skin into the circulation.

10:50
Now, if you're on the equator here -- that's these two lines here, the red line and the purple line -- the amount of nitric oxide that's released is the area under the curve,it's the area in this space here. 
So if you're on the equator, December or June, you've got masses of NO being released from the skin. 
So Ventura is in southern California. 
In summer, you might as well be at the equator. 
It's great. 
Lots of NO is released. 
Ventura mid-winter, well, there's still a decent amount. 
Edinburgh Scotland in summer, the area beneath the curve is pretty good, but 
Edinburgh Scotland in winter, the amount of NO that can be released is next to nothing, tiny amounts.

11:30
So what do we think?
 We're still working at this story, we're still developing it, we're still expanding it. 
We think it's very important. 
We think it probably accounts for a lot of the north-south health divide within Britain, It's of relevance to us. 
We think that the skin -- well, we know that the skin has got very large stores of nitric oxide as these various other forms. 
We suspect a lot of these come from diet, green leafy vegetables, beetroot, lettuce has a lot of these nitric oxides that we think go to the skin. 
We think they're then stored in the skin, and we think the sunlight releases this where it has generally beneficial effects.

12:04
 I'm a dermatologist. 
My day job is saying to people, "You've got skin cancer, it's caused by sunlight, don't go in the sun." 
I actually think a far more important message is that there are benefits as well as risks to sunlight. 
Yes, sunlight is the major alterable risk factor for skin cancer, but deaths from heart disease are a hundred times higher than deaths from skin cancer. 
And I think that we need to be more aware of, and we need to find the risk-benefit ratio. 
How much sunlight is safe, and how can we finesse this best for our general health?


Saturday, December 24, 2016

Longevity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longevity?wprov=sfla1

American life expectancy: Graphic reveals alarming differences in death rates between states | Daily Mail Online

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2182305/American-life-expectancy-Graphic-reveals-alarming-differences-death-rates-states.html

MIT 1971 Obituary Salem Oregon

My First Room mate in the Air Force Riverside California smoggy 100 degrees almost every day did not bother me much.
Summer of 1969 Moon Landing, Charles Manson, etc.

He got all ``A''s at MIT in math and science
but he tried a psychology class and got a C.
But he met his wife in that class, attractive blonde that he married his Sophomore year.
His rich parents picked him up in a big new Cadillac.
He went to high school in Turkey where his sister taught in USA military schools.
He wanted to be a fighter pilot.
He rode a BMW motorcycle and swore they were safe in leathers.
He had 1 accident, testicle got cut out but he put it back in and went to doctor who fixed it right.
He was at MIT on a gymnastics scholarship and could do an Iron Cross which is very hard.
Tall blonde muscular male but a little skinny in the legs with large strong shoulders (typical of gymnastics but he was too tall).
I was hoping to get up to Salem to see him some day.
I can relate to finance people.

cancer sun deficiency. Windows cause cancer, indoors is worse

We are supposed to be 65 degrees Xmas 
After way below zero a few days ago.
Bounced right back to 50 degrees.
Missouri has good weather but is too far north.
Very cold kills germs, molds, allergens and brings out bright sun.

When I moved from San Francisco to Lake Tahoe high altitude June 1995 I immediately started feeling better.
High altitude is closer to the sun so I got a lot more sun than in foggy San Francisco.
I walked and biked all day, nearly, got very strong and could breathe very well in the thin air.  
Also no allergens at high altitude, few plants, no molds, germs, bugs, snakes, etc.  
San Francisco is always wet so green molds growing on everything so over the years I got too much of it.
Diseased people all over some with incurable tuberculosis and worse. 

You need sun not filtered by car windows or house windows or plane windows or fog or smog or clouds or overcast.

Back in the old days when people worked outdoors on farms they did not get skin cancer.
Nowadays they work in office or just sit home and watch TV so they get skin cancer.

French wear bikinis so they live longer.  And French eat proper French food.

Where I lived and grew up in New Mexico was very sunny … 
I got a very dark tan and skin was in great condition.
But I got pale in California foggy Central Valley High School.

I have repeatedly developed health syndromes when living in foggy dark areas or working too much indoors.  

I do not use sunscreens.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/11/20/deadly-melanoma-not-due-vitamin-d-deficiency.aspx

Melanoma Skin Cancer
Is Lack of Sunlight a More Likely Culprit?

Despite all the bad press linking sun exposure to skin cancer, there's almost no evidence at all to support it. 
There is, however, plenty of evidence to the contrary. 
Over the years, several studies have confirmed that appropriate sun exposure actually helps prevent skin cancer. 
In fact, melanoma occurrence has been found to decrease with greater sun exposure, and can be increased by sunscreens.

One of the most important facts you should know is that an epidemic of the disease has in fact broken out among indoor workers. 
These workers get three to nine times LESS solar UV exposure than outdoor workers get, yet only indoor workers have increasing rates of melanoma -- and the rates have been increasing since before 1940.

There are two major factors that help explain this, and the first has to do with the type of UV exposure.

There are two primary types of UV rays from sunlight, the vitamin-D-producing UVB rays and the skin-damaging UVA light. 
Both UVA and UVB can cause tanning and burning, although UVB does so far more rapidly. 
UVA, however, penetrates your skin more deeply than UVB, and may be a much more important factor in photoaging, wrinkles and skin cancers.

A study in Medical Hypotheses suggested that indoor workers may have increased rates of melanoma because they're exposed to sunlight through windows, and only UVA light, unlike UVB, can pass through window glass. At the same time, these indoor workers are missing out on exposure to the beneficial UVB rays, and have lower levels of vitamin D.

Researchers wrote:

"We hypothesize that one factor involves indoor exposures to UVA (321–400nm) passing through windows, which can cause mutations and can break down vitamin D3 formed after outdoor UVB (290–320nm) exposure, and the other factor involves low levels of cutaneous vitamin D3.

After vitamin D3 forms, melanoma cells can convert it to the hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, or calcitriol, which causes growth inhibition and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo. 

… We agree that intense, intermittent outdoor UV overexposures and sunburns initiate CMM [cutaneous malignant melanoma]; we now propose that increased UVA exposures and inadequately maintained cutaneous levels of vitamin D3 promotes CMM."

To put it simply, UVB appears to be protective against melanoma -- or rather, the vitamin D your body produces in response to UVB radiation is protective.

As written in The Lancet:

"Paradoxically, outdoor workers have a decreased risk of melanoma compared with indoor workers, suggesting that chronic sunlight exposure can have a protective effect."

Vitamin D Helps Protect You Against Cancer

Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that influences virtually every cell in your body, and is easily one of nature's most potent cancer fighters. 
So I want to stress again that if you are shunning all sun exposure, you are missing out on this natural cancer protection.

Your organs can convert the vitamin D in your bloodstream into calcitriol, which is the hormonal or activated version of vitamin D. 
Your organs then use it to repair damage, including damage from cancer cells and tumors. 
Vitamin D's protective effect against cancer works in multiple ways, including:

• Increasing the self-destruction of mutated cells (which, if allowed to replicate, could lead to cancer)
• Reducing the spread and reproduction of cancer cells
• Causing cells to become differentiated (cancer cells often lack differentiation)
• Reducing the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing ones, which is a step in the transition of dormant tumors turning cancerous
This applies not only to skin cancer but other types of cancer as well. Theories linking vitamin D to certain cancers have been tested and confirmed in more than 200 epidemiological studies, and understanding of its physiological basis stems from more than 2,500 laboratory studies, according to epidemiologist Cedric Garland, DrPH, professor of family and preventive medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Here are just a few highlights into some of the most noteworthy findings:

• Some 600,000 cases of breast and colorectal cancers could be prevented each year if vitamin D levels among populations worldwide were increased, according to previous research by Dr. Garland and colleagues.
• Optimizing your vitamin D levels could help you to prevent at least 16 different types of cancer including pancreatic, lung, ovarian, prostate, and skin cancers.
• A large-scale, randomized, placebo-controlled study on vitamin D and cancer showed that vitamin D can cut overall cancer risk by as much as 60 percent. This was such groundbreaking news that the Canadian Cancer Society has actually begun endorsing the vitamin as a cancer-prevention therapy.
• Light-skinned women who had high amounts of long-term sun exposure had half the risk of developing advanced breast cancer (cancer that spreads beyond your breast) as women with lower amounts of regular sun exposure, according to a study in the American Journal of Epidemiology.
• A study by Dr. William Grant, Ph.D., internationally recognized research scientist and vitamin D expert, found that about 30 percent of cancer deaths -- which amounts to 2 million worldwide and 200,000 in the United States -- could be prevented each year with higher levels of vitamin D.
When Using the Sun to Fight Cancer, the Dose is What Matters

When I recommend using the sun therapeutically, this means getting the proper dosage to optimize your vitamin D levels. This typically means exposing enough of your unclothed skin surface to get a slight pink color on your skin. Your exact time will vary radically depending on many variables, such as you skin color, time of day, season, clouds, altitude and age.  The key principle is to never get burned, while still spending as much time as you can in the sun during the peak hours, as it is virtually impossible to overdose as long as you don't get burned.

A common myth is that occasional exposure of your face and hands to sunlight is "sufficient" for vitamin D nutrition. For most of us, this is an absolutely inadequate exposure to move vitamin D levels to the healthy range. Further, if you use sunscreen, you will block your body's ability to produce vitamin D!

And, contrary to popular belief, the best time to be in the sun for vitamin D production is actually as near to solar noon as possible which is 1 PM in the summer for most (due to Daylight Saving Time).. The more damaging UVA rays are quite constant during ALL hours of daylight, throughout the entire year -- unlike UVB, which are low in morning and evening and high at midday.

When using the sun to maximize your vitamin D production and minimize your risk of malignant melanoma, the middle of the day (roughly between 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.) is the best and safest time. During this time you need the shortest exposure time to produce vitamin D because UVB rays are most intense at this time. Plus, when the sun goes down toward the horizon, the UVB is filtered out much more than the dangerous UVA.

Once you reach this point your body will  peak at about 10,000-40,000 units of vitamin D. Any additional exposure will only cause harm and damage to your skin. Most people with fair skin will max out their vitamin D production in just 10-20 minutes, or, again, when your skin starts turning the lightest shade of pink. Some will need less, others more. The darker your skin, the longer exposure you will need to optimize your vitamin D production.周凯利