Monday, August 31, 2015

SHTF LA no water?

We talked to a younger movie star looking guy from UCLA that had a water main break last year - there have been several breaks without an earthquake. 
He was speculating on how bad it could be in an earthquake - millions of people without water?  
What could Obama do?
I have been thinking about spending winter in San Diego or Santa Barbara but am increasingly wary of large cities given their fragility, racial hatred, disease, crime, etc.  
Probably will skip that.  
Another guy was 70+ dairyman who lives part time in Altadena (above Pasadena) where he used to run an Altadena dairy.
He retired and moved to Branson.  
We are both walking with canes.  
I walked 10 miles yesterday with a cane and nearly that much today.
Still feel pain 12 days later in sprained calf, and see bruising and swelling but it is almost healed.
That is the same sprain I got 11 years ago that caused me to quit running.  
I think I have decided to be real careful on injury.
I may try to do an iron cross and 1 arm pull up but will probably quit that.
Too easy to snap something.  
After my walk suddenly some big black clouds blew in from east as the sun got lower in the west.
Some days we get fairly strong rain while sun is still out.  
I have to get ready for class tomorrow.

Sunday, August 30, 2015

SHTF preparation for floods

We get the problem of excessive rain around here.   Be prepared!


 $49900 / 1br - 480 square feet - SPRING RIVER CABIN IN ARKANSAS (RAVENDEN)

This newer cabin is waiting for you on the banks of the Spring River in Ravenden, Arkansas. 

It comes completely furnished and ready to go! It offers a bedroom and bathroom with washer/dryer hookup.

 It has a high ceiling accented with tin that provides an additional sleeping area in the loft. 

The interior is a beautifully decorated with a rustic look. 

The flooring is a durable vinyl that looks like hardwood flooring. 

The kitchen features concrete countertops, a stove & refrigerator. 

An added bonus is the covered front porch overlooking the river. 

The cabin itself was built above the flood stage and has its own septic system and water hookup. 

This nice level lot overlooks the Spring River where a spring fed creek flows into the river. 

A public boat dock is beside the lot for easy access.

 Fishing options in the river include small mouth bass, walleye, catfish and the occasional trout. 

It is also popular for swimming and canoeing and known as one of the prettiest rivers in the Ozarks.

Friday, August 28, 2015

My Cyber Security Business $9 computer, + monitor battery keyboard brings total Cost to $50

This is fancier than I need for my Cyber Security Business.   The tricks are in the software, servers, networks, and business contracts.   Costs are very low.  Speed, security very high.    

Can I make a billion dollars?  Will people pay $50 for safety?   I am puzzled that I don't see any real competition.  People surely need a secure way to pay their bills, email their family and friends, write blog posts, social networks, and read news, wikipedia, etc.  Without being so vulnerable to trackers, hackers, thieves, spies, porn, ads, spam, etc.        What is amazing is how much people want to pay lots of money for fancy computers and fast internet connections that enable ads, tracking, hacking etc.  Get rid of the hazards and your computer speeds up so you can use a cheap computer and slow internet connection and still be faster.  

$9 for the computer.    if you want a VGA adaptor or HDMI adaptor you'll have to shell out a little more ($19 and $24 respectively), but you could hook it up to most TVs with the built-in composite video port. The $50 PocketCHIP, however, is truly impressive. It's the same versatile $9 board, but it comes with a case, battery, keyboard and 4.3-inch touchscreen!


Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Famine, Freeze to death, become Mormon

1 degree too cool and millions of people will starve, freeze, or otherwise die.
Volcanoes erupt frequently and could easily be major SHTF.
Cold states such as Vermont lost a lot of population froze to death in 1816.
Some hallucinated (saw the light?) and started Mormonism.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Year_Without_a_Summer

The year 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer (also the Poverty Year, the Summer that Never Was, Year There Was No Summer, and Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death[1]), because of severe climate abnormalities that caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.7–1.3 °F This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere

Cool temperatures and heavy rains resulted in failed harvests in Britain and Ireland. Families in Wales travelled long distances as refugees, begging for food. Famine was prevalent in north and southwest Ireland, following the failure of wheat, oats, and potato harvests. In Germany, the crisis was severe; food prices rose sharply. With the cause of the problems unknown, people demonstrated in front of grain markets and bakeries, and later riots, arson, and looting took place in many European cities. It was the worst famine of 19th-century Europe.

The effects were widespread and lasted beyond the winter. In western Switzerland, the summers of 1816 and 1817 were so cool, an ice dam formed below a tongue of the Giétro Glacier high in the Val de Bagnes. Despite engineer Ignaz Venetz's efforts to drain the growing lake, the ice dam collapsed catastrophically in June 1818.

Asia

In China, the cold weather killed trees, rice crops, and even water buffalo, especially in the north. Floods destroyed many remaining crops. Mount Tambora's eruption disrupted China's monsoon season, resulting in overwhelming floods in the Yangtze Valley. In India, the delayed summer monsoon caused late torrential rains that aggravated the spread of cholera from a region near the River Ganges in Bengal to as far as Moscow.[19]

Causes

The aberrations are now generally thought to have occurred because of the April 5–15, 1815, volcanic Mount Tambora eruption on the island of Sumbawa, Indonesia (then part of the Dutch East Indies, but under French rule during Napoleon's occupation of the Netherlands), described by Thomas Stamford Raffles. The eruption had a volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ranking of 7, a supercolossal event that ejected immense amounts of volcanic ash into the upper atmosphere. It was the world's largest eruption since the Hatepe eruption in 180 AD. That the 1815 eruption occurred during the middle of the Dalton Minimum (a period of unusually low solar activity) may also be significant, during the concluding decades of what has come to be called the Little Ice Age.

Other large volcanic eruptions (with VEIs at least 4) around this time were:
• 1812, La Soufrière on Saint Vincent in the Caribbean
• 1812, Awu in the Sangihe Islands, Indonesia
• 1813, Suwanosejima in the Ryukyu Islands, Japan
• 1814, Mayon in the Philippines

These eruptions had already built up a substantial amount of atmospheric dust. As is common after a massive volcanic eruption, temperatures fell worldwide because less sunlight passed through the stratosphere.[23]
According to a 2012 analysis by Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature, the 1815 Tambora eruption caused a temporary drop in the Earth's average land temperature of about 1 °C. Smaller temperature drops were recorded from the 1812-1814 eruptions.

Effects

As a result of the series of volcanic eruptions, crops in the aforementioned areas had been poor for several years; the final blow came in 1815 with the eruption of Tambora. Europe, still recuperating from the Napoleonic Wars, suffered from food shortages. Food riots broke out in the United Kingdom and France, and grain warehouses were looted. The violence was worst in landlocked Switzerland, where famine caused the government to declare a national emergency. Huge storms and abnormal rainfall with flooding of Europe's major rivers (including the Rhine) are attributed to the event, as is the August frost. A major typhus epidemic occurred in Ireland between 1816 and 1819, precipitated by the famine the Year Without a Summer caused. An estimated 100,000 Irish perished during this period. A BBC documentary using figures compiled in Switzerland estimated the fatality rates in 1816 were twice that of average years, giving an approximate European fatality total of 200,000 deaths.

New England also experienced major consequences from the eruption of Tambora. The corn crop was significantly advanced in New England and the eruption caused the crop to fail. In the summer of 1816 corn was reported to have ripened so badly, no more than a quarter of it was usable for food. The crop failures in New England, Canada, and parts of Europe also caused the price of wheat, grains, meat, vegetables, butter, milk, and flour to rise sharply.

The eruption of Tambora also caused Hungary to experience brown snow. Italy's northern and north-central region experienced something similar, with red snow falling throughout the year. The cause of this is believed to have been volcanic ash in the atmosphere.

In China, unusually low temperatures in summer and fall devastated rice production in Yunnan, resulting in widespread famine. Fort Shuangcheng, now in Heilongjiang, reported fields disrupted by frost and conscripts deserting as a result. Summer snowfall or otherwise mixed precipitation was reported in various locations in Jiangxi and Anhui, located at around 30°N. In Taiwan, which has a tropical climate, snow was reported in Hsinchu and Miaoli, and frost was reported in Changhua.

Cultural effects

Hong Kong sunset circa 1992

High levels of tephra in the atmosphere led to unusually spectacular sunsets during this period, a feature celebrated in the paintings of J. M. W. Turner. This may have given rise to the yellow tinge predominant in his paintings such as Chichester Canal circa 1828. Similar phenomena were observed after the 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, and on the West Coast of the United States following the 1991 eruption of Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines.
The lack of oats to feed horses may have inspired the German inventor Karl Drais to research new ways of horseless transportation, which led to the invention of the draisine or velocipede. This was the ancestor of the modern bicycle and a step toward mechanized personal transport.[26]

The crop failures of the "Year without a Summer" may have helped shape the settling of the "American Heartland", as many thousands of people (particularly farm families who were wiped out by the event) left New England for what is now western and central New York and the Midwest (then the Northwest Territory) in search of a more hospitable climate, richer soil, and better growing conditions.

Chichester Canal circa 1828 by J. M. W. Turner

According to historian L.D. Stillwell, Vermont alone experienced a drop between 10,000 and 15,000 people, erasing seven previous years of population growth.

Among those who left Vermont were the family of Joseph Smith, who moved from Norwich, Vermont (though he was born in Sharon, Vermont) to Palmyra, New York.

This move precipitated the series of events that culminated in the publication of the Book of Mormon and the founding of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

In June 1816, "incessant rainfall" during that "wet, ungenial summer" forced Mary Shelley, John William Polidori, and their friends to stay indoors at Villa Diodati overlooking Lake Geneva for much of their Swiss holiday.[29] They decided to have a contest to see who could write the scariest story, leading Shelley to write Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus and Lord Byron to write "A Fragment", which Polidori later used as inspiration for The Vampyre[30] — a precursor to Dracula. In addition, Lord Byron was inspired to write a poem, "Darkness", at the same time.

Justus von Liebig, a chemist who had experienced the famine as a child in Darmstadt, later studied plant nutrition and introduced mineral fertilizers.

Comparable events

• Toba catastrophe 70,000 to 75,000 years ago
• The 1628–26 BC climate disturbances, usually attributed to the Minoan eruption of Santorini
• The Hekla 3 eruption of about 1200 BC, contemporary with the historical Bronze Age collapse
• The Hatepe eruption (sometimes referred to as the Taupo eruption), around 180 AD
• Extreme weather events of 535–536 have been linked to the effects of a volcanic eruption, possibly at Krakatoa, or Ilopango in El Salvador.
• The Heaven Lake eruption of Paektu Mountain between North Korea and the People's Republic of China, in 969 (± 20 years), is thought to have had a role in the downfall of Balhae.
• An eruption of Mount Rinjani on the island of Lombok in Indonesia, in 1257
• An eruption of Kuwae, a Pacific volcano, has been implicated in events surrounding the Fall of Constantinople in 1453.
• An eruption of Huaynaputina, in Peru, caused 1601 to be the coldest year in the Northern Hemisphere for six centuries (see Russian famine of 1601–1603); 1601 consisted of a bitterly cold winter, a cold, frosty, late (possibly nonexistent) spring, and a cool, wet summer.
• An eruption of Laki, in Iceland, caused thousands of fatalities in Europe, 1783–84.
• The eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991 led to odd weather patterns and temporary cooling in the United States, particularly in the Midwest and parts of the Northeast. An unusually mild winter and a warm, early spring were followed by an unusually cool, wet summer and a cold, early autumn in 1992. Enhanced rainfall occurred across the West Coast of the United States, particularly California, during the 1991–92 and 1992–93 rainy seasons.


See also
• Global cooling
• Little Ice Age
• New England's Dark Day
• Timetable of major worldwide volcanic eruptions
• White Christmas in the Southern Hemisphere

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Cyber Security People and Paperwork Processing

Cyber Security is needed now.

I am thinking some problems are not technical-electronic but are people problems: How do you know who is safe? Popular current systems are usually credit cards and email logins with maybe a phone number and your dog's name. But that does not work well - terrorists, thieves, and hackers from around the world are getting access to systems. I am looking for some simple business procedure to screen potential users of my safe system. I am wondering about forcing people to pay $20 annually in advance by check by USPO. The return address on the envelope must match the address on the check. The bank checks photo ID before giving a bank account. Also mail in a copy of the telecommunications bill - cable, DSL, dish, smartphone, dialup, … with address that matches the check. This would indicate the IP address that the user would be using. Of course criminals can get around this by paying an accomplice in the USA. But this does make it more difficult for many overseas hackers and even USA based hackers. (Maybe I would also want a copy of drivers license with address that matches too? Maybe have it all notarized? Probably people would not do it. )

Another problem is to keep all of my cyber-safe user data completely off my safe computer systems. If the data is not online then it cannot be stolen online. Online users will be just a number unless they want to use their true personal names for some purposes (such as family communications or social media). So any documents from customers would have to be stored securely. The city of Springfield Missouri has huge underground caves - abandoned mines - that are already used for document storage, cheese production, meat processing, etc. Their cost is reasonable.
http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/business/2015/08/25/data-center-springfield-underground-expand/32337975/

People and paperwork processing procedures did work ok before the internet. These can still be used today to increase cyber-security. But these do cost more than the insecure online sign-ups that are common today.

Cyber Security People and Paperwork Processing

Cyber Security is needed now.  

I am thinking some problems are not technical-electronic but are people problems:  How do you know who is safe?  Popular current systems are usually credit cards and email logins with maybe a phone number and your dog’s name.  But that does not work well - terrorists, thieves, and hackers from around the world are getting access to systems.  I am looking for some simple business procedure to screen potential users of my safe system.   I am wondering about forcing people to pay $20 annually in advance by check by USPO.  The return address on the envelope must match the address on the check.  The bank checks photo ID before giving a bank account.  Also mail in a copy of the telecommunications bill - cable, DSL, dish, smartphone, dialup, … with address that matches the check.  This would indicate the IP address that the user would be using.  Of course criminals can get around this by paying an accomplice in the USA.  But this does make it more difficult for many overseas hackers and even USA  based hackers.  (Maybe I would also want a copy of drivers license with address that matches too?  Maybe have it all notarized?  Probably people would not do it. )

Another problem is to keep all of my cyber-safe user data completely off my safe computer systems.  If the data is not online then it cannot be stolen online.  Online users will be just a number unless they want to use their true personal names for some purposes (such as family communications or social media).  So any documents from customers would have to be stored securely.  The city of Springfield Missouri has huge underground caves - abandoned mines - that are already used for document storage, cheese production, etc.  Their cost is reasonable.  
http://www.news-leader.com/story/news/business/2015/08/25/data-center-springfield-underground-expand/32337975/

People and paperwork processing procedures did work ok before the internet.  These can still be used today to increase cyber-security.   But these do cost more than the insecure online sign-ups that are common today.   

Monday, August 24, 2015

Crash, Recession, Profits, Deficits, Re: Markets Closed.....What A Ride

As I told a Finance MBA 10 days ago it is not to late to buy puts (a bet that stock prices will decline).  
I was thinking "When China catches a cold, USA catches pneumonia."

He recited textbook stuff about how people buy too much, get too optimistic, and then when the market starts to decline they panic and sell too much causing a crash.
Everybody has been talking for years about how this bubble is going to burst.
We are overdue a correction.  
The question is how bad will it get.
Corporate profits are high and will stay high unless there is a recession.
So stock prices should not fall very much unless there is a recession.
The question in the near term is psychology.
Excessive fear could cause an excessive crash and bring on a recession that would further push down stock prices.
Also a derivatives foul-up can push down stock prices and the economy but we should expect that financiers learned to handle derivatives better than in 2008.

I expect downward pressure on Stock Prices for the remainder of Obama's term and at least a slowdown if not a recession around election time thus helping Trump.  
Another big question is the deficit and interest rates.
Fiscal policy and monetary policy are stimulative right now.
So what will Yellen Obama do if we have a stock market crash and slide into recession?
More deficits and debt?  
Negative interest rates?
They may have run out of ammo, already highly stimulative before the recession begins!
Will have to wait until 2016 to see if a recession develops and then in 2017 what they will do about it.  
I cannot rule out a 3 year recession or longer.  
There are big disequilibria in the economy that will take some time to work off.
They may kick the can down the road, but some issues such as rapidly growing student debt needs to stop.
Illegal immigration needs to stop.  
Interest rates need to rise.
Government deficits need to be reduced.
The longer they wait to fix the diseases, the more painful the cures will be.

On Aug 24, 2015, at 3:46 PM, Lothar 



Sunday, August 23, 2015

Re: bicycle tricycle engineering has not been solved

I believe the brain needs exercise to grow, develop balance etc.
Some kind of balance practice is needed by everyone whether they had a stroke or not.

I was getting at the frailty that comes with age.
Young people can fall off bikes with less injury, often just get up and continue.
But older people will more likely break something.
Some people get fragile sooner than others depending on diet, exercise, genetics.

There are balance exercises with less risk.
Dance requires fair to excellent balance depending on what kind of dance.
If you fall in Ballroom dancing your partner may be able to catch you.
Ping-pong, bowling, tennis, etc. less chance of injury than bikes.

I have only fallen twice in biking but second time it took 10 years to work loose all the scar tissue to get ribs free floating again.
It is a matter of age and too many carbohydrates and free radicals that speed aging, and not enough electrons and anti-oxidants to slow aging.
Also it is a matter of stretching and working all the small muscles that can break.
I almost never stretch and ignore small muscles to focus on very heavy weights on the large muscle groups.
Recipe for injury. But I got a lot of intense exercise for the small amount of time spent on weight-lifting.

I would do a lot of things different if I knew what I know now.
Trying to avoid injury now, including staying off bikes although that is one of my favorites.
Especially in summer is not as hot as walking or running.
Get to see more on bikes and can get away from problems faster.

> On Aug 23, 2015, at 11:13 AM, Ron wrote:
>
> Joe,
>
> I have a friend that had a severe stroke. His doctor would not allow him to rehabilitate using a bicycle for fear of his falling over (he now scuba dives on weekends). On the other hand if one is an otherwise healthy older person a bicycle should help with retaining balance skills. Dr. Michael Savage pointed this out as well.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Ron
>
>
>
> On Sunday, August 23, 2015 7:30 AM, Joe wrote:
>
>
> I don't recommend bikes for older riders. Too easy to get injured in an accident under most usage conditions.
>
> I have thought about recumbent tricycles - possibly arm cranked for more arm exercise. Maybe electric motor assist for serious long distance commuting. It is clear that the engineering optimal design has not been solved - they look awkward. Complicated by the fact that cities and streets are not well designed and are growing in the wrong direction like the fat slobs that live in the cities.
>
> All wheeled vehicles deprive humans of needed walking for optimal brain function. You need about 10 miles per day of walking to get the 3% per annum brain growth. Also time walking reduces time sitting which is very destructive for health. Bicycles may lead to more sitting if you do not walk enough after bicycle rides. Most bicyclists sit (I usually stand on the pedals).
>
> All rubber tires kill electrical contact with planet earth that is needed as a source of electrons. After using a bike or car you need to swim in a lake to replenish your body's electrons. Triathlons figured that out, especially if you run barefoot or with leather soles such as the moccasins used by my native american ancestors. Horses with iron shoes provide some electrical contact with the earth. Buildings and vehicles need re-engineering to improve electrics.
>
> Wikipedia has good articles on tricycles hand-cycles velo-mobiles etc.
>
> Wikipedia pages load fast indicating that they do not contain advertisements, spyware, trackers, web bugs, excessive images and formatting,.... Usually provides a good overview with many footnotes and references to help locating details without using dangerous blogs and search engines such as google.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recumbent_bicycle
>
> <Waw020.jpg><competition Hand cycle.jpg>
>

University Endowments, Test Scores, Texas Entrepreneurship

Texas has huge $ endowments and Austin is a top 3 business environment competing with Silicon Valley and Route 125 Boston.
If Apple moves to Texas that will be a huge blow.  
Texas Zero corporate income tax is much better than California or Massachusetts.  

But still University of Illinois Urbana Champaign has higher student test scores than Texas although that varies widely by department so depends on the student mix - IL is more engineering science, UT is bigger.  
And Illinois has huge research funding, and large white, German population with a long tradition of Engineering and Science. 
Illinois is nearly bankrupt already.
California is in trouble but not as bad as Illinois right now.  
Texas has money but oil price is collapsing (that will help Illinois and farming states ship grain, manufacturers, poor people, etc).
Must have lots of money to run a university.  
Texas + Texas A&M are richer than any other state now. 
Besides endowment Texas Universities get a big hunk of state budget and lots of tuition and federal aid, and then the research grants and rich companies and a rapidly growing population and huge land. 

Top 50 Endowments As of June 30, 2014  Endowment  Market Value   Rank   Institution  (millions)
1 Harvard University                35,884
2 University of Texas System   25,426
3 Yale University               23,900
4 Stanford University                21,446
5 Princeton University             20,996
6 Massachusetts Institute of Technology    12,425
7 The Texas A&M University System       11,104
8 Northwestern University           9,778
9 University of Michigan          9,731
10 University of Pennsylvania      9,582
11 Columbia University                9,223
12 University of Notre Dame        8,040
13 The University of Chicago           7,546
14 University of California                  7,384
15 Duke University                              7,037
16 Emory University                       6,681
17 Washington University in St. Louis   6,643
18 University of Virginia               5,946
19 Cornell University                         5,890
20 Rice University                               5,528
21 University of Southern California    4,593
22 Dartmouth College                      4,468
23 Vanderbilt University                   4,086
24 The Ohio State University        3,548
25 University of Pittsburgh           3,493
26 Johns Hopkins University          3,452
27 The Pennsylvania State University   3,446
28 New York University                         3,424
29    University of Minnesota & Foundations    3,165
30 Brown University                                    3,000
31 University of Washington                            2,833
32 University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill    2,696
33 Purdue University                                         2,443
34 University of Wisconsin Foundation 2,332
35 University of Richmond                        2,313
36 University of Illinois & Foundation   2,278
37 Williams College                               2,253
38 Amherst College                            2,149
39 Michigan State University          2,145
40 Boston College                           2,131
41 Pomona College                          2,101
42 California Institute of Technology   2,094
43 University of Rochester                 2,015
44 Indiana University & Foundations    1,988
45 The Rockefeller University             1,986
46 Georgia Institute of Technology   1,889
47 Swarthmore College                     1,877
48 Grinnell College                       1,830
49 University of Toronto                       1,821
50 Wellesley College                           1,808
Source: 2014 NACUBO-Commonfund Study of Endowments

Philosophical Gourmet Ferguson Missouri High Rank Terminal M.A.

University of Missouri Saint Louis is located adjacent to the dangerous black suburbs of Berkeley and Ferguson Missouri.
It is much less prestigious than the main campus in Columbia Missouri. 
But it still ranks in the top 4 in the USA in Criminology (lots of crime?)
And in the top 10 in Philosophy for its terminal M.A. program.  
Several other top 10 rankings in communications, information sciences, etc.
Ferguson also has 8000 students in a large community college.

I am not convinced of Obamas plan for more college attendance.
Student brains are fried from electronics, junk food, sitting, lack of exercise, etc.
Constant clouds and rain in Missouri (unusual for August).
I find it hard to get enough sunshine to make Vitamin D, Nitric oxide, etc.
Negroes are too black so they are always in worse health danger than me.
Everybody needs more organic vegetables, fruits, herbs, spices, etc.
USA students need to quit going into debt for student loans while not learning much useful.
Put that money into setting up a sharecropping system so young people can eat well.

Also students could move to appropriate climates away from pollution (smoke, electronics, herbicides, etc.)
Negro DNA is ideally suited to living in Africa (or other equatorial regions).
African exodus would cure the problems in Ferguson (convert minorities to majorities).

North America is ideally suited for persons of Native American Descent.  
Saint Louis was a major site for Native Americans.
South County is very rich and white.
North County is very poor and black.
Lots of minorities but not many Native Americans.




bicycle tricycle engineering has not been solved

I don't recommend bikes for older riders.  Too easy to get injured in an accident under most usage conditions.  

I have thought about recumbent tricycles - possibly arm cranked for more arm exercise. Maybe electric motor assist for serious long distance commuting.   It is clear that the engineering optimal design has not been solved - they look awkward.  Complicated by the fact that cities and streets are not well designed and are growing in the wrong direction like the fat slobs that live in the cities.

All wheeled vehicles deprive humans of needed walking for optimal brain function.  You need about 10 miles per day of walking to get the 3% per annum brain growth.  Also time walking reduces time sitting which is very destructive for health.  Bicycles may lead to more sitting if you do not walk enough after bicycle rides.  Most bicyclists sit (I usually stand on the pedals).

All rubber tires kill electrical contact with planet earth that is needed as a source of electrons.  After using a bike or car you need to swim in a lake to replenish your body's electrons.  Triathlons figured that out, especially if you run barefoot or with leather soles such as the moccasins used by my native american ancestors.   Horses with iron shoes provide some electrical contact with the earth.   Buildings and vehicles need re-engineering to improve electrics.  

Wikipedia has good articles on tricycles hand-cycles velo-mobiles etc.    

Wikipedia pages load fast indicating that they do not contain advertisements, spyware, trackers, web bugs, excessive images and formatting,....  Usually provides a good overview with many footnotes and references to help locating details without using dangerous blogs and search engines such as google.  






Saturday, August 22, 2015

Privacy, University, Rain: Lake Electrons improve blood flow and health.

I may start a company for private, secure, fast, cheap internet services.  It is clear that the current systems are not working.  And it is clear to me that there are many possible fixes.  Very sudden and surprising turn around for me, though, after getting set to do some theoretical mathematics which is hard.   Not sure if I can convert to applied mode any more although that was easier for me in the past.  May have to move back to San Francisco suddenly.  

Rain almost daily, some nights very cool, 50 or below?  Hi may get up to 80 some days but summer is quickly fading.

I drove 300 miles and took many hours of classes then injured my calf gastrocnemius playing badminton.  I knew I would get too excited and break something as I have not played that game since high school and those muscles shrank to near zero.  I am walking with a cane but the injury is healing fast.  I stuck my leg in the lake to absorb healing electrons.  It works.  See the video and long article worth listening to several times.  I have verified some of this by experiments on myself.


Grounding Helps Thin Dangerously Thick Blood and Fights Inflammation and Disease


When you walk barefoot, free electrons are transferred from the earth into your body, and this grounding effect is one of the most potent antioxidants we know of.

Inflammation thrives when your blood is thick, and you have a lot of free radical stress, and a lot of positive charges in your body. Grounding effectively alleviates inflammation because it thins your blood and infuses you with negatively charged ions through the soles of your feet.

Surfaces that allow for proper grounding include sand, grass, bare dirt, and untreated concrete, brick and ceramic tile. Leather-soled shoes also allow you to ground while walking, whereas rubber-soled shoes disconnect you from the earth and block beneficial electron transfer.

Grounding helps thin your blood by improving its zeta potential, which means it improves the energy between your red blood cells.  Research has demonstrated it takes about 80 minutes for the free electrons from the earth to reach your blood stream and transform your blood.


Lake Electrons improve blood flow and health.

Lakes are filled with electrons and water is a great conductor.  I plug my feet into the lake to recharge myself whenever possible.  Electrons also help heal blisters and injuries.     Great video and long article:


Grounding Helps Thin Dangerously Thick Blood and Fights Inflammation and Disease


When you walk barefoot, free electrons are transferred from the earth into your body, and this grounding effect is one of the most potent antioxidants we know of.

Inflammation thrives when your blood is thick, and you have a lot of free radical stress, and a lot of positive charges in your body. Grounding effectively alleviates inflammation because it thins your blood and infuses you with negatively charged ions through the soles of your feet.

Surfaces that allow for proper grounding include sand, grass, bare dirt, and untreated concrete, brick and ceramic tile. Leather-soled shoes also allow you to ground while walking, whereas rubber-soled shoes disconnect you from the earth and block beneficial electron transfer.

Grounding helps thin your blood by improving its zeta potential, which means it improves the energy between your red blood cells.  Research has demonstrated it takes about 80 minutes for the free electrons from the earth to reach your blood stream and transform your blood.


Friday, August 14, 2015

Poverty, Inequality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Poor Austria, Alps

A scholar working on understanding poverty and inequality with access to other experts with decades of experience.  He has computerized data and software.  He is working on a computer system to help collaboration of scholars working in the field so they can share and examine the facts easily.  I did not realize Austria, Hungary, Czech were so poor until recently.


We are aiming to establish an editorial board from expert in each field to improve this collaboration and review process. 

Our role model here is the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy – a fantastic freely available web publication with an editorial board with subject editors.

There are many aspects of living conditions that we care about and OurWorldInData should show what we know about them and how they changed over time. Some are often talked about: life expectancy, war, famine, literacy, homicides, … Others are less often talked about but equally important: human height for example is an indicator for the quality of food supply and health, and a high volatility of food prices is a serious problem for poor people. OurWorldInData has a lot of topics to cover! The main reason why I want to continue to work on this free web publication is to expand the content: I have data on more than 400 topics and only a fraction are covered yet. For example, right now we are working on an empirical perspective on cancer and on suicides. Two of the many important topics not covered yet. With more funding we want to cover more topics. To get more researchers involved to create and review this project we look for funding.

2 – A proper database that allows the web publication to always be up to date     One of biggest problems of the current technical framework of OurWorldInData is that each visualization has to be done individually: A spreadsheet with the data has to be prepared and you then have to write a page of html and javascript to visualize the data stored in this file. This means a lot of manual work to add one visualization and it is also very cumbersome to update figures with new data.    Zdenek – who joined earlier this year as a web developer – has started building a system that will eliminate this tedious, not-scalable process. He is essentially creating two tools: A first tool that allows us to upload data into one central SQL database (as opposed to the current system of individual unconnected csv files). And a second tool with which we can then pull any of the data from this database and visualize it in an interactive chart (see my screenshot of the tool). This is the heart of the whole project and will require more work in the coming year.

The chance to incorporate feedback continuously is one of the greatest advantages of an online publication. Researchers themselves have been very motivated to provide both their data and feedback; not surprisingly researchers are keen on presenting the research they care about to a larger audience.   In the future we want to extend this collaboration and turn OurWorldInData into a collaborative publication: It will become a publication in which the expert on famines is presenting an overview of the history of famines and the research on why famines happen and when famines are less likely to happen. Similarly, the expert on war writes about his research topic, and so do the experts on malaria, on child mortality, on CO2 emissions, on democratization, on homicides, on wealth inequality, on income inequality and so on. The feedback and collaboration with other researchers at the University of Oxford and other academic institutions will ensure that the presented information is the best data available and the revisions will make sure that the presented content is up to date.







Wednesday, August 12, 2015

no gloom. Obama boom

In a cyclical growing economy the bulls will be right about 60% of the time and the bears will be right about 40% of the time.

Before listening to any purveyor of gloom and doom go to the library and check out books they wrote early on in the administrations of
1) Clinton
2) Bush2
3) Obama

Did they predict the huge stock market boom that occurred during those administrations?
If they are stuck on gloom and doom they will be wrong 60% of the time.
A broken watch will be right twice per day.
If the gloomy prognosticators don't see big booms coming then toss their junk into the trash can.  

It appears the Federal Reserve has figured out how to inflate the stock market and deflate poor 99% fairly well.
The rich own most of the stocks so over time get richer from the upward trend. 
The rich induce the poor to buy stocks during the boom, then the rich sell out of the market before it crashes.
The crash deflates the poor suckers who bought stocks too late.
When the market hits bottom the rich scoop up the bargains and get the Fed to inflate the stock market again.

The Obama boom is huge, looking at the widest market index

Wilshire Associates, Wilshire 5000 Full Cap Price Index© [WILL5000PRFC], 
retrieved from FRED, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis 
August 12, 2015.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Powersite Dam Kathleen Van Buskirk

Some clouds but warm sunny day high 80s low 60s,
Still much is underwater downstream of Powersite Dam.
Buildings underwater.  Roads underwater, etc.
Lots of electricity has been generated from all this water.
Days getting shorter.
Schools are starting back.
Feels like summer is almost over.
I had to drive 60 miles to get a haircut, shop at 4 stores, go the gym, examine some records at the city and county, 
A lot of the city around here is brand new.
Reminds me of Los Angeles and San Diego in the 1960s, only much wetter and greener.
My new fitness center seems more upscale than the last one in a better brand new part of town. 
And a lot more stuff - huge swimming pool and indoor air conditioned walking / running track.
Better weights.  

Powersite Dam
by Kathleen VanBuskirk
When Powersite Dam, Missouri's first hydroelectric impoundment, went into service in 1913

Sunday, August 9, 2015

Pessimism for the sheeple to sell books and other stuff

I remember the 1960s hippies screeching about quakes and nuclear war and the collapse of civilization as they left San Francisco and other to northern California Humboldt where they smoked themselves to death on marijuana and their children have trouble staying alive to age 18. San Francisco is still booming, better off without the hippies who got replaced by cheap hard working Chinamen.

I remember investment advisors warning of impending doom all through the greatest stock market boom in modern history 1982- actually is still going on. "The coming economic depression."

Even in the 1950s boom, many still thought that the depression would come back and banking system would collapse.

Fear and greed are profitable emotions to stir up if you are selling something.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pessimism_porn

Pessimism porn is aneologism coined in 2009 during the 2007-2012 global financial crisis to describe the alleged eschatological and survivalist thrill some people derive from predicting, reading and fantasizing about the collapse of civil society through the destruction of the world's economic system.

Origin

Pessimism porn's coinage is attributed to Hugo Lindgrenwhen he wrote about the concept in New York in February 2009.

Lindgren wrote of the attraction of predicting and planning for economic collapse:

Like real porn, the economic variety gives you the illusion of control, and similarly it only leaves you hungry for more.

But econo-porn also feeds a powerful sense of intellectual vanity. You walk the streets feeling superior to all these heedless knaves who have no clue what's coming down the pike. By making yourself miserable about the frightful hell that awaits us, you feel better. Pessimism can be bliss too.

The change in programming of news channels to infotainment has played a role in the spread of pessimism porn.

Instead of news programming designed to put the issues of the day in a context understandable to viewers, stories follow an "if it bleeds it leads" priority that increase people's fear and anxiety followed by advertisements that offer a way to soothe those anxieties, such as ones for companies for investing in gold to hedge against economic collapse.

Thomas P.M. Barnett, chief analyst at Wikistrat, has criticized apocalyptic predictions for the global economy as problematically short-sighted because "human history is progress, so if you're constantly having to screen out the good to spot the bad, your vision will be unduly narrow....you must consistently discount advances as 'illusions' and 'buying time' and so on, and after a while, you're just this broken clock who's dead-on twice a day."

In her book Apocalypse and Post-Politics: The Romance of the End, Regent University professor Mary Manjikian linked Lindgren's concept of pessimism porn to Frank Kermode's "eschatological anxiety," which he wrote about in his landmark The Sense of an Ending. Kermode argued that "worrying about the apocalypse is actually a feature of societies undergoing significant social and technological transitions."

Purveyors

Purveyors of pessimism porn tend to cite as examples of an approaching economic Armageddon the scenario of the world, particularly the Chinese, giving up on the dollar as areserve currency; movements such as Occupy Wall Street; and the collapse of the European Union and the Euro.

Mainstream economists usually disregard the econometricsof people who forecast the collapse of society and the need to resort to survivalism because of what they perceive as the imminent end of the western financial model

Lindgren cited the blog Calculated Risk as a "reliable turn-on" for its author's knack for writing about the dangers of plummeting rates for various goods, such as commercial paper.

Peter Schiff and trend forecaster Gerald Celente were singled out by ABC News as purveyors of pessimism porn.

Celente has predicted that in 2012 the United States will see food riots, shanty towns in Central Park and "economic martial law," and that the only protections from the chaos to come are "the three g's — gold, guns and a get-away plan."

Alex Pareene called Nouriel Roubini the "Joe Francis of Pessimism Porn" for writing multiple doomsday columns for major publications, including a February 2009 column in the Washington Post declaring that unless the U.S. government seized and nationalized all banks the system would collapse.

See also

• 2007-2012 global financial crisis
• Eschatology
• Millenarianism
• Pessimism
• Risks to civilization, humans, and planet Earth

Saturday, August 8, 2015

My ancestors Sioux Indians SHTF pole of inaccessibility

5 of my 7 uncles were born in South Dakota on the border of the huge Pine Ridge Indian reservation
which contains the poorest county in the USA,
and the poorest town in the USA.

Sioux were pushed there by the USA federal government that stole their land to the east.
Then gold was discovered in the Black Hills and Sioux were pushed out of the gold areas despite the promise that was their land for eternity.

A good place to live if SHTF.
20,000 year old civilization off the grid.
Sioux were better off before white trash and negroes invaded North America.
You can't even get there by auto, very well.
South Dakota has no income tax and is maybe the lowest taxed state.
South Dakota is also the most popular for billionaires and many banking operations.
Plush suburbs where my parents were born along the Sioux river between Sioux City and Sioux Falls.
Quite a contrast in 1 state.

Sioux were the largest and strongest people discovered by Europeans, confirmed by archaeological studies of bones.
Ate bison, vegetables, corn, squash, etc.
Well fed. Little warfare.
But a lot of danger from bison, wolves, bear, lions, tigers, so they got strong and smart.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pole_of_inaccessibility

pole of inaccessibility marks a location that is the most challenging to reach owing to its remoteness from geographicalfeatures that could provide access.

Often it refers to the most distant point from the coastline.

The term describes a geographic construct, not an actual physical phenomenon.

Subject to varying definitions, it is of interest mostly to explorers and adventurers.

In North America, the continental pole of inaccessibility is in southwest South Dakota about 11 km (7 mi) north of the town of Allen (also considered the poorest place in the United States),

Pine Ridge was established in 1889 in the southwest corner of South Dakota on the Nebraska border.

Today it consists of 3,468.85 sq mi of land area and is the eighth-largest reservation in the United States, larger than Delaware and Rhode Island combined.

The reservation encompasses the entirety of Oglala Lakota County, the southern half of Jackson County and the northwest portion of Bennett County.

Of the 3,143 counties in the United States, these are among the poorest.

Only 84,000 acres (340 km2) of land are suitable for agriculture.

Monett Missouri Jack Henry

I drove by this and was surprised to find them in the middle of nowhere.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Henry_%26_Associates

Jack Henry & Associates, Inc.
Traded as NASDAQ: JKHY

Founded Monett, Missouri (1976)

Headquarters Monett, Missouri, United States

Key people
John F. "Jack" Prim, Chairman and CEO
David B. Foss, President
Website www.jackhenry.com

Jack Henry & Associates is an S&P 400 company[1] that supports more than 11,300 financial institutions with core processing services.

JHA was ranked the 18th largest provider of information technology services to the financial services industry worldwide in the 2009 FinTech 100 surveys.

Headquartered in Monett, Missouri, JHA made $1.129 billion in annual revenue during fiscal 2013 (ended June 30).


Contents [hide]
• 1 History
• 2 Corporate structure
• 2.1 Jack Henry Banking
• 2.2 Symitar
• 2.3 ProfitStars
• 3 Acquisitions and divestitures
• 3.1 2014
• 3.2 2010
• 3.3 2009
• 3.4 2007
• 3.5 2006
• 3.6 2005
• 3.7 2004
• 3.8 2003
• 3.9 2002
• 3.10 2000
• 4 References
• 5 External links

History[edit]

Jack Henry & Associates (commonly referred to as JHA) was formed in 1976 by Jack Henry and Jerry Hall in Verona, MO. In 1977, Jack Henry & Associates was incorporated and generated $9,360 in revenue.[4]
The company went public October 29, 1985 with an IPO of 1.5 million primary shares. JHA started acquiring other companies in 1992. It acquired Symitar in 2000. In 2004, JHA's focused diversification acquisition strategy resulted in the acquisition of a number of companies and products that can be sold outside JHA's core client base to all financial services organizations regardless of charter, asset size, core processing platform. In 2006, JHA launched its third primary brand – ProfitStars – to encompass the specialized products and services assembled through its focused diversification acquisition strategy. In 2010 the company acquired iPay Technologies, which operated as the largest independent provider of electronic bill pay services in the United States.[5]


Corporate structure

JHA provides hardware and software for financial institutions. The company supports more than 11,300 customers through three primary brands.

Jack Henry Banking[edit]
Jack Henry Banking is a provider of the core and complementary services banks use to process financial transactions, automate business processes, and manage information. The original JHA business line supports approximately 1,300 banks—ranging from community banks up.[6] This line includes NetTeller Online Banking.[7]

Symitar[edit]
Symitar was founded in 1984 and acquired by JHA in 2000. Symitar's flagship product is Episys, a software application used to manage member base and process transactions. It has its own PowerOn scripting language, RepGen, and its own SymConnect interface allowing for access by Symitar, other JHA add-on modules, and third-party applications. In 2002 JHA acquired South Carolina-based CU Solutions to bolster the services it provided through Symitar.[8]

ProfitStars[edit]
The ProfitStars brand was launched in February 2006. It provides best-of-breed solutions that enhance the performance of domestic and international financial institutions of all asset sizes and charters using any core processing system, as well as diverse corporate entities. [9]
Acquisitions and divestitures[edit]
2014[edit]
• Banno[10]
2010[edit]
• iPay Technologies [11]
2009[edit]
• Pemco Technologies [12]
• Goldleaf Financial Solutions, Inc. [13]
2007[edit]
• AudioTel Corporation [14]
• Gladiator Technology Services [15]
2006[edit]
• US Banking Alliance [16]
2005[edit]
• Profitstar, Inc.[17]
• Stratika [18]
• Tangent Analytics, LLC[19]
2004[edit]
• SERsynergy Division of SER Solutions, Inc. [20]
• TWS Systems, Inc.[21]
• Optinfo, Inc. [22]
• Verinex Technologies, Inc. [23]
• Banc Insurance Services [24]
• Select Payment Processing, Inc.[25]
• Alex eSolutions, Inc., suite of regulatory reporting software [26]
• e-ClassicSystems, Inc. [27]
• Yellow Hammer Software, Inc. [28]
2003[edit]
• National Bancorp Data Services, LLC [29]
2002[edit]
• CU Solutions, Inc.[30]
• Transcend Systems Group, Inc [31]
2000[edit]
• Symitar Systems, Inc. [32]
• Sys-Tech, Inc. [33]
• BancData Solutions, Inc. [34]
References[edit]
• Jump up ^ Hoovers
• Jump up ^ FinTech 100
• Jump up ^ "Selected Financial Data" (PDF). JHA Annual Report: 25. 2013. Retrieved 17 June 2014.
• Jump up ^ JHA History
• Jump up ^ JHA Press Releases
• Jump up ^ http://www.jackhenrybanking.com/More-From-Jack-Henry-Banking/pages/About-Us.aspx
• Jump up ^ NetTeller Online Banking Jack Henry Banking.
• Jump up ^ http://www.symitar.com/More-From-Symitar/pages/About-Us.aspx
• Jump up ^ http://jkhy.client.shareholder.com/releasedetail.cfm?ReleaseID=188351
• Jump up ^ "Jack Henry & Associates Acquires Banno".

Scientists Predict 9.2 EARTHQUAKE TSUNAMI Fox News WARNS LEAVE

Good video. I have been aware of this problem for decades. One reason I moved far inland. Humboldt University had seminars on this topic. It is worse than this vide suggests. Pacific Ocean is dangerous. Sell Microsoft stock. SF, Silicon Valley, Irvine, SDSU, UCSB can be greatly damaged. Some areas will be totally wiped out. It will happen.


> On Aug 8, 2015, at 10:43 AM, Lothar wrote:
>
> Check out this video on YouTube:
>
> http://youtu.be/-jB6G08Qgmg
>
>
> Peace, Lothar

Friday, August 7, 2015

96 years older than dirt and fit!

I joined a new exercise club today way across town.
Lots of new weightlifting machines and an indoor track.
I discover this week walking on a flat surface foot pain goes away totally.
Too much slamming into the sides of shoes causes blisters, etc.
Rainstorm Midnight-5AM with amazing non-stop bright lightning but not much thunder.  
Was sunny but getting overcast and cloudy after Noon.
---------------
multiple athletic records, 
global weightlifting titles 
36 World Rowing Masters medals 
96-year old retired dentist with dual British/Swiss nationality, is a changed man. 
Nine years ago, his body was deteriorating badly, he was overweight and short of breath – to put it another way, his body was winding down. But Eugster fought back and now, almost a decade on, he is leading a pensioner revolution with a new lease of life.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/active/mens-health/11784880/Meet-Charles-Eugster-Britains-fastest-nonagenarian.html


Thursday, August 6, 2015

electrons the best anti-aging anti-oxidant: wade in the lake, ocean

Sunny after morning fog burned off.
Wading in the lake / ocean is a good source of electrons, the best anti-oxidant - I can feel it.  
The earth has a positive charge, donates electrons to free radicals so they do not burn your tissues to get electrons causing faster aging.
People designed to walk bare-footed on the earth and eat several pounds of vegetables and fruits.
good articles on anti-oxidants:

Free radicals, antioxidants and functional foods: Impact on human health
Free radicals reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are generated by our body by various endogenous systems, exposure to different physiochemical conditions or pathological states. A balance between free radicals and antioxidants is necessary for proper physiological function. If free radicals overwhelm the body's ability to regulate them, a condition known as oxidative stress ensues. Free radicals thus adversely alter lipids, proteins, and DNA and trigger a number of human diseases. Hence application of external source of antioxidants can assist in coping this oxidative stress.

Our bodies are under constant attack by reactive molecules called "free radicals."
These molecules have unpaired electrons that can damage important cell structures like proteins and DNA. 
This is where antioxidants step in. They donate electrons to the free radicals, effectively disarming them. 
This is believed to be protective against aging and many diseases that are partly caused by oxidative stress, including cancer.
Additionally, antioxidants can have various other biological effects and are considered to be very important for overall health.
Interestingly, coffee contains very large amounts of several powerful antioxidants. These include hydrocinnamic acids and polyphenols, to name a few
Hydrocinnamic acids are very effective at neutralizing free radicals and preventing oxidative stress
Additionally, the polyphenols found in coffee may help prevent a number of diseases, such as heart disease, cancer and type 2 diabetes 


How Free Radicals are Formed
Normally, bonds dont split in a way that leaves a molecule with an odd, unpaired electron. But when weak bonds split, free radicals are formed. Free radicals are very unstable and react quickly with other compounds, trying to capture the needed electron to gain stability. Generally, free radicals attack the nearest stable molecule, "stealing" its electron. When the "attacked" molecule loses its electron, it becomes a free radical itself, beginning a chain reaction. Once the process is started, it can cascade, finally resulting in the disruption of a living cell.
Some free radicals arise normally during metabolism. Sometimes the body?s immune system?s cells purposefully create them to neutralize viruses and bacteria. However, environmental factors such as pollution, radiation, cigarette smoke and herbicides can also spawn free radicals. 
Normally, the body can handle free radicals, but if antioxidants are unavailable, or if the free-radical production becomes excessive, damage can occur. Of particular importance is that free radical damage accumulates with age.
How Antioxidants May Prevent Against Free Radical Damage
The vitamins C and E, are thought to protect the body against the destructive effects of free radicals. Antioxidants neutralize free radicals by donating one of their own electrons, ending the electron-"stealing" reaction. The antioxidant nutrients themselves don?t become free radicals by donating an electron because they are stable in either form They act as scavengers, helping to prevent cell and tissue damage that could lead to cellular damage and disease.
Vitamin E ? The most abundant fat-soluble antioxidant in the body. One of the most efficient chain-breaking antioxidants available. Primary defender against oxidation. Primary defender against lipid peroxidation (creation of unstable molecules containing more oxygen than is usual).
Vitamin C ? The most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in the body. Acts primarily in cellular fluid. Of particular note in combating free-radical formation caused by pollution and cigarette smoke. Also helps return vitamin E to its active form.
The Antioxidants and Disease Prevention 
• Heart Disease ? Vitamin E may protect against cardiovascular disease by defending against LDL oxidation and artery-clogging plaque formation.
• Cancer ? Many studies have correlated high vitamin C intakes with low rates of cancer, particularly cancers of the mouth, larynx and esophagus.

The Lesson:  Eat Your Fruits and Vegetables!
The antioxidants are believed to help protect the body from free-radical damage. But before you go out and stock your pantry with mega-doses of these vitamins, be warned: more is not always better. The long-term effect of large doses of these nutrients has not been proven. Other chemicals and substances found in natural sources of antioxidants may also be responsible for the beneficial effects. So for now, the best way to ensure adequate intake of the antioxidant nutrients is through a balanced diet consisting of 5-8 servings of fruits and vegetables per day.

Bankrupt Illinois high taxes, fat pensions destroy work ethic and budgets. worse that California!

Illinois has a worse credit rating than California!
Illinois is the worst state in the USA! (Obama home)
https://www.illinoispolicy.org/illinois-has-lowest-credit-rating-of-all-50-states/

Missouri has the best , maximum rating AAA
Need more tightwads like Missouri.
Keep taxes low.
Don't waste money!

Horror stories in this good article:

Special Report: Local authorities soak Illinois homeowners in taxes

By Tim Reid and Selam Gebrekidan • Reuters

Mary Beth Jachec lives in a three-bedroom house in Wauconda, a village of 14,000 in Illinois, 45 miles northwest of Chicago. Her semi-detached brick home is unassuming. Her tax bills are not.

The 53-year-old insurance manager gets a real estate tax bill for 20 different local government authorities and a total payout of about $7,000 in 2014. They include the Village of Wauconda, the Wauconda Park District, the Township of Wauconda, the Forest Preserve, the Wauconda Area Public Library District, and the Wauconda Fire Protection District.

Then there is Wauconda Road and Bridge, not to be confused with Road and Bridge, Wauconda Gravel, or with Wauconda Special Road Improvement and Gravel unit — all three of which have imposed separate taxes on her and the village's other homeowners.

Those three road entities come under the auspices of Wauconda Township. Officials there struggled to explain exactly what they each do, and why three separate taxing bodies are needed. The Wauconda Township Highway Commissioner, Joe Munson, said: "They are all for road maintenance." So why three? "I don't know why," Munson said. "It's always been that way."

Jachec, looking at her property tax bill, is dismayed. "It's ridiculous," she said.

A lot has been said about the budget crisis faced by Illinois — the state government itself is drowning in $37 billion of debt, and has the lowest credit ratings and worst-funded pension system among the 50 U.S. states. But at street level, the picture can be even more troubling.

The average homeowner pays taxes to six layers of government, and in Wauconda and many other places a lot more. In Ingleside, 55 miles north of Chicago, Dan Koivisto pays taxes to 18 local bodies. "I pay $271 a month just to the school district alone," he said. "And I don't have children."

DUPLICATION OF SERVICES

The state is home to nearly 8,500 local government units, with 6,026 empowered to raise taxes, by far the highest number in the U.S. Texas — whose population is more than twice that of Illinois — is second highest with about 5,150 local government units. Florida, with a population 54 percent greater than Illinois, has just 1,650, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Many of these taxing authorities, which mostly rely on property tax for their financing, have their own budget problems. That includes badly underfunded pension funds, mainly for cops and firefighters.

The Illinois authorities range from those typical across the nation, such as school and fire districts, to the unusual: for example, districts that raise taxes solely for the purpose of killing mosquitoes, lighting streets or maintaining cemeteries.

A Reuters analysis of property tax data shows that the sheer number of local government entities, and a lack of oversight of their operations, can lead to inefficient spending of taxpayer money, whether through duplication of services or high overhead costs. It leads to a proliferation of pension funds serving different groups of employees. And there are also signs that nepotism is rife within some of the authorities.

There is no central repository of data on the size and geographical boundaries of the local government authorities. The state comptroller does not audit the annual financial reports the local governments submit to it, said Rich Carter, a spokesman for the Comptroller's office.

The state's revenue department does keep data on property taxes collected by counties, but does not track taxes on individual properties. This makes it virtually impossible to systematically determine how many taxing districts overlap on parcels of land, or how much tax residents in a particular area pay unless they are individually surveyed. Because of these gaps and omissions, it is difficult to assess whether multiple layers of government lead to higher taxes.

On average, Illinois' effective property taxes are the third highest in the U.S. at 1.92 percent of residential property values, only behind New Jersey and New Hampshire, according to the non-partisan Tax Foundation. (New Hampshire, unlike Illinois and New Jersey, doesn't have a state income tax or a state sales tax.)

Critics of both the high taxation and the state's governance structure say that it takes too much of a toll on homeowners, discouraging people from either coming to the state or staying in it. Illinois saw net migration of 95,000 people out of the state last year, the greatest in its history and second only to New York, according to U.S. Census data. It is unclear how much, if any, of that exodus might be due to high taxes.

In many Illinois cities and towns, high taxation still isn't enough to keep up with increasing outlays, especially soaring pension costs, and some services have been cut. For example, in the state capital Springfield, pension costs for police and fire alone will this year consume nearly 90 percent of property tax revenues, according to the city's budget director, Bill McCarty. Since 2008, Springfield has cut 11 percent of its police force, closed three libraries, and tapped into other funds to pay pensions, McCarty added.

Sam Yingling, a state representative who until 2012 was supervisor of Avon Township, north of Chicago, has become an outspoken critic of the multiple layers of local government.

Yingling said when he left the township three years ago, the township supervisor's office had annual overheads from salaries and benefits of $120,000. He claimed its sole mandated statutory duty was to administer just $10,000 of living assistance to poor residents. Lisa Rusch, the current Avon Township supervisor, disputed the welfare figure, saying her office provides between $50,000 to $70,000 in emergency and general assistance.

Yingling also criticizes the township for its road program. In its budget for the current fiscal year, more than $1.4 million has been appropriated for road and bridge maintenance. Bob Kula, Avon Township's highway commissioner, says the township maintains just under 13 miles of roads.

BORROWING RESTRICTIONS

The large number of local governments is a legacy of Illinois' 1870 constitution, which was in effect until 1970. The constitution limited the amount that counties and cities could borrow, an effort to control spending.

So when a new road or library needed building, a new authority of government would be created to get around the borrowing restrictions and to raise more money. Today, for example, there are over 800 drainage districts, most of which levy taxes.

A succession of Illinois governors over 20 years has called for a reduction of the number of government units, but made little progress, partly because of Byzantine regulations. To dissolve one of Illinois' 1,432 townships, for example, state law stipulates that three-quarters of voters in every township in that county must vote to approve.

When that state's newly elected Republican Governor Bruce Rauner established a commission to address the problem of local government, the group quickly discovered that the taxing units continue to proliferate. The net number of local government units increased by 148 between 1998 and 2015, the governor's office reported last month.

"You could probably get by with half as many," said Bill Brandt, the recently retired chair of the Illinois Finance Authority, which funds economic development projects. "But knocking out a local government is easier than it sounds. It requires legislation, and a lot of lawmakers on both sides of the aisle come from local government."

And it isn't only the number of authorities that is a concern. Illinois has about one sixth of America's public pension plans — 657 out of almost 4,000.

Local authorities in Illinois are mandated by law to keep the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, with 400,000 local government members, fully funded. They had to contribute $923 million in 2014, up from $543 million in 2005.

However, there is no such requirement for the local pension funds. The result: Many of these funds throughout the state are woefully underfunded, and some have less than 20 percent of what they need to meet obligations.

"Pension costs have been going up and up, so pension contributions have been going up and up, and property taxes are the single largest source of revenue to pay for them," Brandt said.

Townships alone provide a striking example of duplicated and costly services.

Cook County is the largest county in Illinois and second largest in America, with Chicago in its borders. There, property tax assessment and collection is done at the county level. But most of Cook County's 30 townships have elected and salaried property tax assessors. They neither assess nor collect property taxes, said Louise Muszynski, an assistant in the Cook County assessor's office.

"They do work," Muszynski said. "They help people at a local level to understand their bills, and help them with appeals."

Northfield Township's road district raised almost $1.4 million in property taxes in the last fiscal year – even though it contains parts of seven cities. Each of those cities has a government that provides road maintenance services, yet Northfield Township maintains its own network of 29 miles of roads, as well as sewers. It has six plow trucks and other equipment, and a full-time workforce of seven, said Wally Kehr, the township road district foreman, who earns more than $110,000 a year, according to the main Illinois pension database.

"We give a better service to local people than if the cities provided it," Kehr said.

In a rare instance of local government consolidation, officials in DuPage County, west of Chicago, managed to pass legislation in 2012 giving them the power to cut waste. Since then, they have abolished defunct sanitary and fire protection districts, cut duplicate staff and reduced benefits. Officials estimate savings to taxpayers of $100 million over 20 years.

EMPLOYING RELATIVES

The multiplicity of local governments also affords opportunity for nepotism. Looking at the database of the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund, the main pension system for local government workers, Reuters identified nearly a dozen instances where husbands employ wives, mothers employ daughters, and fathers hire sons.

In Collinsville Township, in southwestern Illinois, the elected Highway Commissioner, Larry Trucano, employs his son James as a laborer, earning $71,000 a year, plus pension and health benefits, according to the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund database. An official at Collinsville confirmed that James was employed by his father. Four telephone calls to Larry Trucano went unanswered.

In Venice Township, Andrew Economy, the township supervisor who earns $46,300 plus pension — he also runs a local auto repair and tow service — employs his wife, Debra Economy, as administrator. She earns almost $62,000 plus pension.

Andrew Economy said his wife does the jobs of two employees who retired in 2003 and 2008, and does them efficiently.

In the Village of Rosemont, population 4,000, which services Chicago's O'Hare Airport with hotels and a convention center, eight relatives of Mayor Bradley A. Stephens are village employees, including the police chief.

"Rosemont has never made an apology for the people they hire," said Gary Mack, a village spokesman. "The mayor holds any employees who happen to be related to him to a much higher standard than others."


Special Report: Local authorities soak Illinois homeowners in taxes

http://www.stltoday.com/business/local/special-report-local-authorities-soak-illinois-homeowners-in-taxes/article_57a6ccab-961d-5526-8c05-68815b915404.html

Deflation computers

Poor 99% can do more than rich 1% if they are smart.

Getting cheaper all the time.

Should not cost much to do all kinds of things.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/2921073/meet-chip-an-ultra-tiny-9-pc-that-makes-the-raspberry-pis-price-seem-luxurious.html

Meet Chip, an ultra-tiny $9 PC

Chip comes with a 1GHz Allwinner R8 Cortex A8 processor with Mali-400 graphics, 512MB RAM, and 4GB storage.

It also has built-in 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.0.

That's a better processor than the Raspberry Pi model B+, and equivalent RAM; the beefier, quad-core Raspberry Pi 2 model B, meanwhile, doesn't come with onboard storage, built-in Wi-Fi, or Bluetooth.

Chip will come with a Raspbian-like Linux-based operating system pre-installed.

Chip measures 2.3-inches by 1.5 inches.

To keep the price down, Next Thing did have to cut out many features you might expect from a board like this.

It only has one USB port,

a microUSB port for power, and

camera sensor support.

There's only a composite connection for video, but there are adapters available for HDMI and VGA.

In addition to the two video adapters, Chip also has its own portable peripheral called the Pocket Chip. The $40 device (Kickstarter price) includes a

4.3-inch touchscreen with 470-by-272 resolution,

keyboard, a

3,000 mAH battery (with a 5-hour battery life claim), and

GPIO breakouts for those times you need to prototype on the go.

Pocket Chip is designed to just let you slap Chip into the back and be and running quickly.