Friday, February 28, 2014

Privacy, security online. gun rights. second amendment

Emails are getting hard for me. I have 100 email addresses, most junk.
Some are getting hammered by unknown hackers and spoofers. Today a
flood of bounces poured into one account for no obvious reason.

I run 20 websites. Some occasionally get attacked by robots, hackers,
etc. Often from China. Some get 20,000 visitors a day, clobbering the
server. I can setup a fairly good website in an hour or two nowadays.
Gets cheaper and easier all the time.

The internet is getting too dangerous, too frilly, and too programmed by
the powers that be to exert mind control over the sheeple.

I have been using email daily and building websites for over 20 years. I
often feel like pulling the plug. Quit paying for problems and they go
away. Was going to click "cancel account" today but think I will wait
until summer to run some experiments. Then greatly simplify operations.

Need to take some classes at a good university and develop some good
contacts in the big city. Specifically on security, privacy, and
monetary transactions. Lots of developments. Need to drive up to
Chicago U Illinois Urbana but they say snow tomorrow.

I will resend the jokes below because they seemed to not made it in my
mail this morning from my ipod.

Simple living

Simple living

 grassroots awareness campaign, National Downshifting Week (UK)[21](founded 1995) encourages participants topositively embrace living with less. Campaign creator, British writer and broadcaster on downshifting and sustainable living, Tracey Smith says, "The more money you spend, the more time you have to be out there earning it and the less time you have to spend with the ones you love." National Downshifting Week encourages participants to 'Slow Down and Green Up' and contains a list of suggestions for individuals, companies, children and schools to help adopt green or eco-friendly policies and habits, develop corporate social and environmental responsibility in the workplace, and create eco-protocols and lessons that work alongside the national curriculum, respectively.

Reducing possessions or the size of homecan also form part of simple living. The 100 Thing Challenge is a grassroots movement to whittle down possessions to a mere 100 items, with the aim of decluttering and simplifying people's lives.[22] The small house movement includes individuals who chose to live in small mortgage-free low-impact dwellings, such as log cabins orbeach huts.[23]


Gun rights, second amendment: Morning Jolt

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This just about says it all.
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"Where can I get my pistol engraved like this?"
---------

A reporter did a human-interest piece on the
Texas Rangers. The reporter recognized the Colt
Model 1911 the Ranger was carrying and asked him
"Why do you carry a 45?" The Ranger responded,
"Because they don't make a 46."
---------

The old sheriff was attending an awards dinner
when a lady commented on his wearing his
sidearm. "Sheriff, I see you have your pistol.
Are you expecting trouble?" He promptly
replied, "No Ma'am. If I were expecting
trouble, I would have brought my shotgun."
---------

I was once asked by a lady visiting if I had a
gun in the house? I said I did. She said, "Well
I certainly hope it isn't loaded!" To which I
said, "Of course it is loaded;it can't work
without bullets!" She then asked, "Are you that
afraid of someone evil coming into your house?"
My reply was, "No,not at all. I am not afraid
of the house catching fire either, but I have
fire extinguishers around, and they are all
loaded too."
*And don't forget the US Marine slogan: When in
doubt, fire the whole clip*

HAVE A NICE DAY!
And Remember...
[]
I'm part of the one percent... because 99%of
people who read this won't forward it!

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/>
Version: 2012.0.2247 / Virus Database: 3705/6595 - Release Date:
02/15/14

Thursday, February 27, 2014

greenhouses for better food, avoid chemicals

Jeff,

I eat seasonal fruits grown nearby or in the USA. I like to gather wild
by hand, like wild persimmons. Seasonal fruits are available only a few
weeks a year so I am not likely to get too much chemical buildup from
any particular fruit. But there are lots of chemicals in everything
unless you can find it wild. I had more wild access in California.

I have been looking at greenhouses for 15 years for better control and
output (maybe live in a greenhouse?) At our latitude we can probably
greatly extend the growing season and types of plants grown. We only
have 2-3 months of winter or less. I have deer, fish, lobster everywhere.

Lots of information on the internet.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Climatron

The Climatron is a greenhouse enclosed in a geodesic dome that is part
of the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis Missouri. the dome is the
world's first completely air-conditioned greenhouse enclosed in rigid
Plexiglass. Completed in 1960. The broad climatic range within the dome,
which recreates a lowland rain forest, is achieved by sophisticated
climate controls without using interior partitions. 175 feet in diameter
and 70 feet high.

Escalating Drug Overdoses. Ban prescriptions not guns.

I am coming around to the libertarian position of legalising drugs if they are organic grown outdoors in the lower 48 states   Pot heroin cocaine moonshine whiskey etc. get people off perscriptions and dangerous Obamacare.  

Deaths caused by overdosing on painkillers now surpass murders and fatal car accidents in the US. America's rising drug problem recently received renewed attention following the death of Philip Seymour Hoffman.1

The 46-year-old Oscar-winning actor died from a heroin overdose on February 2. Last year, Hoffman entered rehab when addiction to prescription painkillers led him to switch to heroin. US officials now acknowledge that narcotic painkillers are in fact a driving force in the rise of substance abuse and lethal overdoses.

Over the past five years alone, heroin deaths have increased by 45 percent2--an increase that officials blame on the rise of addictive prescription drugs such as Vicodin, OxyContin, Percocet, codeine, and Fentora, all of which are opioids.

The reason for the resurgence of heroin is in large part due to it being less expensive than its prescription counterparts. 


http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/02/27/drug-overdose.aspx?e_cid=20140227Z1B_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20140227Z1B&et_cid=DM41262&et_rid=440596053

Sheeple behavior. An Antidote to Big Brother

billmoyers.com/segment/essay-an-antidote-to-big-brothers-chill

Big Brother broadcasts propaganda and spies on citizens — our lives are dominated by cellphones, tablets and laptops

Bill concludes that "all those people genetically designed to be regimented into total social conformity and subservient to the groupthink of the one percent… could easily have walked right out Huxley and straight into Roger Ailes' Fox News playbook or Rush Limbaugh's studio."

Dragnet Nation, he says, is the "antidote to Big Brother's chill."


Privacy vs Surveillance. Protect yourself!

Practical steps you should take. Like

Carry wallet phones ipads in aluminum foil. Steel. Faraday cage. Turned off. 

www.wnyc.org/story/privacy-security-and-freedom-world-surveillance

The government, private companies, and even criminals use technology to indiscriminately sweep up vast amounts of our personal data.

 Investigative journalist Julia Angwin conducts a series of experiments to try to protect herself from data mining—she quit Google and started carrying a disposable cell phone—to show how difficult it is for the average citizen to avoid America's surveillance economy. 

She looks at the profound implications for our values, our society, and ourselves in her 



Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Sinister Citibank warning on postage paid envelope

The back of the ad I got today has the attached sinister warning.

I guess they got tired of people mailing them bricks or feces so got a
law passed.

I just told a guy over the phone I wanted these ads stopped.

I spent an hour sending him emails on how they could improve their service.

I am surprised they asked me, so I gave them a lot of advice. Citibank
is all screwed up, my least favorite bank.

I don't really use credit card credit, just a payment vehicle. I pay the
bill weekly or sooner.

I am moving more to credit cards than debit cards for better security
and I don't have to punch in a pin at most stores. Sometimes have to sign.

I haven't used cash in 4 years. But am thinking about using cash for
small purchases to save the store swipe fees.

Bank cards and security is a big mess.

Swedish blondes and witches. Torsåker

Sheeple get possessed by the craziest ideas if they listen to the wrong
preachers, teachers, singers, gossip....

Some of my ancestors came from the blondest part of Sweden that was once
infested by witches reminding me of the recent Red Riding Hood movie

<iframe width="560" height="315"
src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ekKMYAOmTj0" frameborder="0"
allowfullscreen></iframe>

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mora_witch_trial

Based only on this testimony from children, on August 23 the commission
identified seventy adult witches, twenty-three of whom confessed and
were executed on August 25 with the remaining forty-seven sent to Falun
for later execution. In addition, fifteen children were executed with
fifty six children sentenced to various other corporal punishments

fourteen women and the man were decapitated with an axe, and their
corpses were lifted up unto the stakes: first seven on the first stake,
five at the second and three at the third, a terrifying spectacle, and
burnt. Additionally six women were subsequently executed.

In February 1670, the governor complained that there was suddenly talk
of witches everywhere, and that this hysteria was spreading as fire in
dry grass. Vicars were constantly writing to him asking for more witch
trials,

The Mora witch trial was the first mass witch trial in the great Swedish
witch hunt and, in the following years, it grew until it reached its
peak in the Torsåker witch trials of 1675. 71 people: 6 men and 65
women were beheaded and then burned, all in a single day.

the local court executed the prisoners directly without confirmation of
the sentences from their superiors, and the execution was therefore not
lawful. The commission was also called from Torsåker to the capital to
answer for their actions. They were defended by the local authorities in
Torsåker, but there were to be no more executions in Torsåker.

The witch-hunt in the country continued; after the Torsåker witch trial,
it reached the capital, where it lasted until 1676 and ended with the
execution of Malin Matsdotter in Stockholm, after which the

authorities proved that the child witnesses were lying and it had been a
mistake. In 1677, all the priests in the country were ordered to tell
their congregations in the churches that the witches had now been
expelled from the country forever to avoid further witch trials.

In Torsåker, the boys who had pointed at the women at the church, the
so-called "visgossarna" (the tale boys), were found with their throats cut.

Opt out pre-screened credit card and insurance offers junk mail

Banks waste too much paper and postage sending me pesky applications for
financial products I do not want. The less I deal with them the better.
Privacy.

I found a website to stop this waste, permanently:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optoutprescreen.com

Optoutprescreen.com is a joint venture among Equifax, Experian, Innovis,
and TransUnion, allowing customers to opt out of receiving credit card
solicitations by mail. August 1, 2005, the Fair and Accurate Credit
Transactions Act of 2003 took effect, required consumer reporting
agencies to include in their credit offers a statement allowing
customers to stop unsolicited offers either by phone 1-888-567-8688 or

https://www.optoutprescreen.com/

General FAQs

What is Electronic Opt-Out for Five Years?

What is Permanent Opt-Out by Mail?

Why do I need to print and mail a Permanent Opt-Out Election Form in
order for my permanent Opt-Out request to become effective?

What is Opt-In?

What is a firm (preapproved / prescreened) offer of credit or insurance?

I submitted an Opt-Out request several weeks ago and I'm still receiving
offers.

I've submitted Opt-Out requests through this website and to the Direct
Mail Association (DMA), but I'm still receiving offers.

I am concerned that you do not have my correct address for my phone
number. I called your Opt-Out telephone number and, after entering my
home telephone number, the system provided me with an address that is
not mine. Is this the address that is on my credit report?
Does exercising my right to Opt-Out affect my ability to apply for
credit or insurance?

Does Opting-Out improve my credit score?

How do I stop receiving mail at my address for another party?

I would like to submit an Opt-In or Opt-Out request for other members of
my family. Is this permitted?

How do I complete an Opt-In request by mail for a child under 13 years
of age?

How do I complete an Opt-Out request by mail for a child 13 years of age?
My spouse is deceased. How do I stop receiving mail that is addressed to
them?
How do I stop receiving solicitation telephone calls?
How do I stop receiving telephone calls for a person who does not live
with me?
How do I contact the Federal Trade Association (FTC)?
I'm having difficulties submitting my request through this website. What
should I do?
How can I provide a suggestion or complaint about the Opt-Out Service or
this website?
What is the proper way to create a link to OptOutPrescreen.com?
Security FAQs

Is this site legitimate?
How secure is my information?
What security procedures do you use for this website to protect the
confidentiality of my social security number?
How are cookies used on this website?
How can I accept cookies?
Why do I need to type characters from a picture to submit my personal
information?
What should I do if I suspect I have received a fraudulent e-mail
regarding this service?
What if I receive a call offering or marketing Opt Out Prescreen?
What is Electronic Opt-Out for Five Years?
Opting-Out refers to the process for removing your name from lists
supplied by the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies, Equifax, Experian,
Innovis and TransUnion, to be used for firm (preapproved / prescreened)
offers of credit or insurance. Your rights as a consumer under the Fair
Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) include the right to "Opt-Out" for 5 years
or permanently.

By choosing the five year Opt-Out option, you can complete your request
on this secure website. Your name will not be eligible for inclusion on
lists used for firm offers of credit or insurance for five years.

Through this site, the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies are providing
consumers with an easy and convenient way to exercise their right to
Opt-Out for 5 years. This service is not intended for businesses or
companies.

What is Permanent Opt-Out by Mail?
Opting-Out refers to the process for removing your name from lists
supplied by the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies, Equifax, Experian,
Innovis and TransUnion, to be used for firm (preapproved / prescreened)
offers of credit or insurance. Your rights as a consumer under the Fair
Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) include the right to "Opt-Out" for 5 years
or permanently.

If you choose permanent Opt-Out, you must "confirm" your request in
writing by submitting a signed Permanent Opt-Out Election form. At the
time that you submit your electronic request, you will receive a
confirmation that you should print along with the Permanent Opt-Out
Election Form. You may begin the permanent Opt-Out process on this
secure website, however, in order to complete your request, you must
return the signed Permanent Opt-Out Election form. The Permanent Opt-Out
Election form will be provided to you after you initiate your request on
this website. In the interim, we will complete a 5 year Opt-Out request
on your behalf within 5 business days. We will make your request
permanent when we receive your signed Permanent Opt-Out Election form.

Through this site, the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies are providing
consumers with an easy and convenient way to initiate their right for
permanent Opt-Out. This service is not intended for businesses or companies.

Why do I need to print and mail a Permanent Opt-Out Election Form in
order for my permanent Opt-Out request to become effective?
Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), upon receipt of a notice
from a consumer, the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies, Equifax,
Experian, Innovis, and TransUnion, are required to exclude a consumer's
name from the firm (preapproved / prescreened) lists that they provide
in connection with a credit or insurance offer that is not initiated by
a consumer. The FCRA requires that the consumer submit a signed notice
of election (Permanent Opt-Out Election form) for a permanent Opt-Out
request. In the interim, we will complete a 5 year Opt-Out request on
your behalf within 5 business days. We will make your request permanent
when we receive your signed Permanent Opt-Out Election form.

Through this website, you may initiate a Permanent Opt-Out request. At
the time that you submit your electronic request, you will receive a
confirmation that you should print along with the Permanent Opt-Out
Election Form.

What is Opt-In?
Under the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), Equifax, Experian, Innovis,
and TransUnion, are permitted to include your name on lists used by
creditors or insurers to make firm (preapproved / prescreened) offers of
credit or insurance. If you have previously completed a request to
Opt-Out from receiving firm offers, you must complete a request to
Opt-In to begin receiving offers again. You do not need to complete a
request to Opt-In if you have not previously submitted an Opt-Out request.

What is a firm (preapproved / prescreened) offer of credit or insurance?
A firm offer of credit or insurance is defined as any offer of credit or
insurance to a consumer that will be honored if the consumer is
determined, based on the consumer's credit report, to meet the specific
criteria used to select the consumer for the offer, subject to certain
confirmation requirements.

I submitted an Opt-Out request several weeks ago and I'm still receiving
offers?
Even though your request becomes effective with Equifax, Experian,
Innovis and TransUnion within five days of your request, you may not see
an immediate reduction in the amount of offers you receive. This is
because your name may have already been provided to some companies that
have not yet mailed their offers to you.

While your name will be removed from the lists that Equifax, Experian,
Innovis and TransUnion provide to businesses for the purpose of making
you a firm offer of credit or insurance, you may continue to receive
offers from sources that do not use Consumer Credit Reporting Companies
to compile their lists.

You may not Opt-Out from Direct Mail Association (DMA) lists through
this website.

The DMA tracks consumers who prefer not to receive mail or telephone
solicitations. The DMA can provide information about Opting-Out of lists
produced by companies that subscribe to its Mail and Telephone
Preference Services. You may contact the DMA at the following web
address: https://www.dmachoice.org/.

I've submitted Opt-Out requests through this website and to the Direct
Mail Association (DMA), but I'm still receiving offers.
Opting-Out will not end solicitations from all local merchants,
religious and charitable associations, professional and alumni
associations, politicians, and companies with which you conduct
business. To eliminate mail from these groups - as well as mail
addressed to "occupant" or "resident" - write directly to each source.

I am concerned that you do not have my correct address for my phone
number. I called your Opt-Out telephone number and, after entering my
home telephone number, the system provided me with an address that is
not mine. Is this the address that is on my credit report?
No, the Opt-Out telephone application has a feature where we can match
your telephone number to an address database. The vendor who supplies
this database obtains their information from a variety of proprietary
sources and there is not a record of who provides each address in the
database.

The address database that is part of the Opt-Out telephone application
is not obtained from the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies, Equifax,
Experian, Innovis and TransUnion. An address that is associated with
your telephone number in this database has no relationship with the
address on record with the consumer credit reporting companies.
Opt-Out does not have access to the consumer credit reporting company's
records.

Does exercising my right to Opt-Out affect my ability to apply for
credit or insurance?
No, removing your name from these lists for firm offers of credit or
insurance does not affect your ability to apply for or obtain credit or
insurance.

Does Opting-Out improve my credit score?
No, since inquiries for firm offers for credit or insurance are not used
in calculating credit scores, Opting-Out does not improve your credit
score. Similarly, inquiries for firm offers for credit or insurance do
not reduce your credit score.

How do I stop receiving mail at my address for another party?
We suggest several steps to stop mail for an individual who does not
live at your address.

The United States Postal Services has set policies on refusing mail that
is sent to your address. Visit
http://pe.usps.gov/text/dmm300/508.htm#wp1045146 to review these policies.
Call the company who sent you the mail and tell them that the person is
not at your address.
I would like to submit an Opt-In or Opt-Out request for other members of
my family. Is this permitted?
No. You may only submit an Opt-In or Opt-Out request for yourself and/or
for third parties for whom you are the legal parent, guardian, executor,
administrator, etc.

How do I complete an Opt-In request by mail for a child under 13 years
of age?
The Consumer Credit Reporting Companies will not accept Opt-In requests
for persons under 13 years of age.

How do I complete an Opt-Out request by mail for a child under 13 years
of age?
The Consumer Credit Reporting Companies do not knowingly maintain credit
files on minor children. If you suspect that your minor child's
information has been used fraudulently, you should contact the Consumer
Credit Reporting Companies directly and report the illegal use of your
child's information to law enforcement. If you want to complete an
Opt-Out request for your minor child because of concerns relating to
fraud, please supply each Consumer Credit Reporting Company with your
child's complete name, address, date of birth and a copy of the minor
child's birth certificate and social security card. Additionally, please
provide a copy of your driver's license or other government-issued proof
of your identity, which includes your current address so the Consumer
Credit Reporting Companies may promptly respond to your request. The
addresses for the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies are listed below:

Equifax
P.O. Box 740256
Atlanta, Georgia 30374

Experian
P.O. Box 9532
Allen, Texas 75013

Innovis Consumer Assistance
P.O. Box 495
Pittsburgh, PA 15230-0495

TransUnion
P.O. Box 6790
Fullerton, CA 92834
My spouse is deceased. How do I stop receiving mail that is addressed to
them?
We suggest several steps to stop receiving mail that is addressed to
your deceased spouse.

To eliminate firm offers of credit or insurance for your deceased
spouse, please click here. This will enable you to request that Equifax,
Experian, Innovis or TransUnion no longer use your deceased spouse's
credit file for firm offers of credit or insurance.
Contact your deceased spouse's creditors directly. Contact the company
that sent the mail to your deceased spouse and request that they stop
sending mail to your deceased spouse.
How do I stop receiving solicitation telephone calls?
Please visit the Federal Trade Commission's website for information on
how to stop solicitation telephone calls.
www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/tcpa.html

How do I stop receiving telephone calls for a person who does not live
with me?
Please visit the Federal Trade Commission's website for more information
on how to stop unwanted telephone calls.
www.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/tcpa.html

How do I contact the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)?
Federal Trade Commission
Consumer Response Center
Room 130
600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20580
www.ftc.gov/credit

I'm having difficulties submitting my request through this website. What
should I do?
If you are having difficulties submitting your request through this
website, we suggest that you try your request again later. In order to
process your request, you are required to provide your personal
information. It is important to provide all of the information, so that
your request can be accurately fulfilled.

All Opt-Out requests must be submitted through this website or through
our toll-free telephone number, 888-567-8688.

How can I provide a suggestion or complaint about the Opt-Out Service or
this website?
Please see the Contact Us section for contact information.

What is the proper way to create a link to OptOutPrescreen.com?
OptOutPrescreen.com permits links from legitimate websites to
www.optoutprescreen.com. Since its launch on December 1, 2004,
OptOutPrescreen.com has placed a premium on maintaining the integrity
and security of consumers. Security precautions include the latest
"Captcha" technology, HTTPS and Verisign TM certification. As another
security precaution, when a user attempts to link to
www.optoutprescreen.com, a new web browser window will display fully the
www.optoutprescreen.com home page. "New window" links help maintain the
security and integrity of how our services are presented and made
available to consumers on the Internet.

To create a link to www.optoutprescreen.com, the following HTML code can
be used:

<A HREF="http://www.optoutprescreen.com" target="_blank"> link_text </A>

Where link_text is the text (typically underlined) that the user can
click to link to www.optoutprescreen.com.

Is this website legitimate?
OptOutPrescreen.com is the only internet website authorized by Equifax,
Experian, Innovis and TransUnion for consumers to Opt-Out of firm offers
of credit or insurance. You may request to Opt-Out from firm offer lists
for 5 years or permanently. If you have previously completed a request
to Opt-Out from receiving firm offers and would like to Opt-In, you may
also complete your request on this website. Consumers should not provide
their personal information to any other company or person in connection
with requesting Opt-Out services under the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

How secure is my information?
OptOutPrescreen.com recognizes the importance of secure online
transactions, and we use security technologies to safeguard the
information you provide us through this website. When we transmit your
information to the Consumer Credit Reporting Companies, your information
is encrypted. In addition, we take other reasonable physical, technical,
and procedural safeguards for purposes of protecting your personally
identifiable information.

Further, the site's security protocols and measures are designed to
protect the personally identifiable information you provide from
unauthorized access or alteration. These measures include physical
security, technological security measures and encryption of certain
information.

What security procedures do you use for this website to protect the
confidentiality of my social security number ?
Your Social Security Number is not required to process an Opt-Out
request through OptOutPrescreen.com. However, we strongly urge you to
provide this information because it helps to ensure that we can
successfully process your request. This website's security protocols and
measures are designed to protect the personally identifiable information
you provide from unauthorized access or alteration. As an added security
measure, we only display the last four digits of your Social Security
number on the confirmation screen.

See answer to How secure is my information? above for more information.

How are cookies used on this website?
Cookies must be enabled to confirm your Opt-Out request through this
website.

This website uses cookie technology for the following purposes:

To allow us to gather aggregated statistical data about the use of this
website for management and development purposes; and
To help improve your navigation of this website

How can I accept cookies?

You can decide if and how your computer will accept a cookie by
establishing your preferences in your web browser. Internet Explorer is
set up to allow the creation of cookies; however, you can specify that
you be prompted before a site puts a cookie on your hard disk.

Why do I need to type characters from a picture to submit my personal
information?

Typing the characters from a picture helps ensure that a person, not an
automated computer program, is completing the form. In most cases, an
automated program cannot recognize the characters in the picture. This
step helps protect the security of your personal information.

What should I do if I suspect I have received a fraudulent e-mail
regarding this service?
If you suspect you've received a fraudulent e-mail, or are a victim of a
phishing attempt or have other security concerns regarding
OptOutPrescreen.com, please write to:

Opt-Out Department
P.O. Box 2033-A
Rock Island, IL 61204-2033

Please do not submit your Opt-Out request through this address. Requests
submitted through this address will not be processed.

What if I receive a call offering or marketing Opt Out Prescreen?
Opt Out Prescreen does not make outbound phone calls. Calls offering or
marketing solutions for consumers to Opt-Out are not authentic, and we
recommend you hang up if you receive a call of this nature. If you would
like to complete an Opt-In or Opt-Out request, please click here or call
toll free 1-888-5OPT-OUT (888-567-8688).

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

asset value, scarcity, SHTF: Bit-coin scam collapses

Bob,

Scarcity of bitcoins is not sufficient to give it value. Especially
numbers on a computer. There are many numbers scarcer than 21,000,000.
Mathematicians can come up with any number of schemes for mining scarce
numbers. Take a class in computer cryptography. Large primes are hard
to calculate which is why many encryption algorithms work. Wikipedia
reports on some of these that are already working.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_currency#Major_cryptocurrencies

Millions more schemes can be invented and be made more market-worthy
than bitcoin, like less theft-prone, for example. There is nothing
scarce about numbers on the computer. Only the business arrangements
and court enforcement that can force players to turn over valuable fiat
money. Most sheeple will probably have more fun with virtual currencies
won in Facebook games that can never be turned into fiat money or spent
on anything outside the game.

Bitcoin bubble invented by Japanese banks to win some valuable fiat US$
to try to stop decades of deflation. They will try to keep the bubble
going -- they mined cheap, and can get more $ if price goes up.

Like the gold bubble invented by US banks to separate USA sheeple from
their valuable fiat money. Bankers bought up gold when it was cheap
1980s-2000s and are now selling gold at huge profits plus writing
derivatives on gold so they can win $ whether gold price goes up or
not. Gold is a means to the end, fiat $.

Bankers pulled the same trick on oil, silver and other commodities.
Bitcoin is just a another tool for inflating the bankers and deflating
the poor 99%

Scarcity is not what gives value. Ebola, flesh eating viruses, etc. are
scarce but people will pay money to avoid them, not to buy them.

A horse is worth more than all the gold, silver, jewels, in the realm.
Remember Shakespeare: "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_III_(play)

Diamonds are scarce and water plentiful but if you are thirsty enough
you will pay more for water than diamonds.

If SHTF people will give all their gold, bitcoins and other assets for
what it takes to survive (that the Amish have in abundance). Retirement
for many is SHTF, or just getting sick, even with Obamacare, or getting
pregnant. At some point they will sell bubbled assets.

Eventually bubbles burst. But there is a lot of demand for games,
gambling, investing and real shopping. Sheeple buy the craziest of
things. Money laundering or other illegal activity can be facilitated
by bitcoins. There will be a market for some virtual currencies or
diamonds, metals, rare earths or similar. But not high enough return
for legitimate investors.

The money will be made by the miners. So get a degree in mining,
geology, computer science, etc.

Banks have been the main users of computers since the beginning of the
industry. Not very smart users but large personnel count. Big clumsy
"legacy systems" that actually work, do simple things, but very hard to
modernize. Drive around any big city and be amazed at how many offices
and people it takes to do simple bean counting. (Many buildings filled
with diesel and generators to keep the computers going. I sat by those
noisy contraptions for 6 years).
> Joe, from a math standpoint, that poses an interesting paradox. Since BTC
> are limited by math to 21 million, anything over roughly 300 "millibits" per
> person would be a "fair share" per person, much like anything over one ounce
> of gold would be "more than a person's fair share."
>
> Now if 744K coins are lost, that increases the value of the [fewer]
> remaining coins. If the missing coins are truly stolen, they'll likely be
> spent, but loss seems to be the case, much like Silk Road's "Dread Pirate"
> wallet, seized by the FBI they tell us, but unable to spend. Additional
> losses would be instigated by Bankers at the risk of cheapening their own
> issue. It would be like robbing passengers on an oceanliner and then dumping
> the loot in the ocean.
>
> When authorities representing the banking world attack BTC because they see
> it as a threat to their proprietary and exclusive system, they must be
> careful not to do things that actually raise the value and desirability of
> their invisible enemy. They face a real dilemma in choosing the proper
> course of action to salvage their lucrative scam. We learned a few days ago
> that JPM (with zero trading losses last year) employs more software
> developers than Google and Microsoft, so you can bet that their best hired
> guns are working on this.
>
> Bankers bought gold so they could issue counterfeit papers of ownership to
> support their fiat, but if they buy too vigorously, the supply decreases and
> price goes up - not what they want. They (central banks) had been eagerly
> selling gold (a useless relic) all through the 90s and early in this century
> to try to suppress the rise in value (price) of gold. Now they find
> themselves in a position where it's difficult to get any to continue the
> ruse.
>
> Until the closure, one could buy BTC for $100 on Mt Gox and sell for $600 on
> any other exchange, similar to what the Big Banks do with their computer
> trading programs. BTC owners are finding it was foolish to keep money in an
> exchange (using a bank is always foolish!) rather than their own "wallet."
> If ZIRP goes to NIRP, as the Banking Cartel is seeking, that will be a
> lesson for all of us - take your money OUT of banks because they will only
> destroy or confiscate it. It will be interesting to see if the Banking
> Cartel can succeed through fear and intimidation or whether they'll have to
> join the crowd and copy cryptocurrency as JPM is seeking permission to do.
> They have SO much more to lose here than we sheeple do.
>
> BB
>
> A penny of electricity to produce $1200 bit coin on a computer. Want to buy
> one? Is it stolen? What is your recourse?
>
> Sheeple will pay a lot for "coins". Does not mean they have value. They do
> not pay dividends in valuable fiat money.
>
> "Greater fool" buy. Seek to find a greater fool who will pay more than you
> did.
>
> If no buyers then value is 0
>
> http://nyti.ms/1fo7M0A
>
> NYTimes: Apparent Theft at Mt. Gox Shakes Bitcoin World
>
> The prominent Bitcoin exchange was said to be on the verge of total collapse
> following a major theft, even as another company announced plans for a
> high-profile virtual currency market.
>
> A document circulating widely in the Bitcoin world said the company had lost
> 744,000 Bitcoins in a theft that had gone unnoticed for years. about 6
> percent of the 12.4 million Bitcoins in circulation
>

EPA: Stop Dental Mercury Dumping

Hey,

I just signed the petition "EPA: Stop Dental Mercury Dumping" and wanted to see if you could help by adding your name.

Our goal is to reach 2,500 signatures and we need more support. You can read more and sign the petition here:

https://www.change.org/petitions/epa-stop-dental-mercury-dumping-4?recruiter=83545779

Bit-coin scam collapses

A penny of electricity to produce $1200 bit coin on a computer. Want to buy one? Is it stolen? What is your recourse?

Sheeple will pay a lot for "coins". Does not mean they have value. They do not pay dividends in valuable fiat money.

"Greater fool" buy. Seek to find a greater fool who will pay more than you did.

If no buyers then value is 0

http://nyti.ms/1fo7M0A

NYTimes: Apparent Theft at Mt. Gox Shakes Bitcoin World

The prominent Bitcoin exchange was said to be on the verge of total collapse following a major theft, even as another company announced plans for a high-profile virtual currency market.

A document circulating widely in the Bitcoin world said the company had lost 744,000 Bitcoins in a theft that had gone unnoticed for years. about 6 percent of the 12.4 million Bitcoins in circulation

Why. brain. mind. Get rich. Get smart

Rich get richer by better understanding of people. Command and control the sheeple. 

Now is the best time to get phd in behavioural science

If you are good you can get money for your research

http://nyti.ms/MVYi0x

NYTimes: The Brain's Inner Language

colleagues at the Allen Institute for Brain Science are working to decode what a mind's neurons are saying to each other to produce behaviour

gathering chemical, electrical, genetic and other information about what the structure of that part of the brain is and what activity is going on.

They will develop electron micrographs that show every neuron and every connection in that part of a brain. 

done on dead tissue. Then they will use several techniques to see what goes on in that part of the brain when a living animal reacts to different situations. "We can record the activity of every single cell in a volume of cortex, and capture the connections," 

With chemicals added to the brain, the most advanced light microscopes can capture movies of neurons firing. Electrodes can record the electrical impulses. 

And mathematical analysis of all that may decipher the code in which information is moved around that part of the brain.

solving the first part of the problem — receiving and analyzing sensory information — might be done in 10 years. 

An engineer's precise understanding of everything from photons to action could be more on the order of 20 to 30 years away

He is studying only one part of one animal's brain, but, he said, the cortex — the part of the mammalian brain where all this calculation goes on — is something of a general purpose computer. 

So the rules for one process could explain other processes, like hearing. 

And the rules for decision-making could apply to many more complicated situations in more complicated brains. 

Perhaps the visual cortex can be a kind of Rosetta stone for the brain's code.

Monday, February 24, 2014

body cameras' for police officers

IOne supporter of body cameras is state Rep. Brandon Ellington, D-Kansas City, who recently introduced a bill that would require uniformed police officers across Missouri to wear them.

He said they're needed because it's difficult now to document police misconduct.

"You see a lot of questionable activity" in lower-income areas, Ellington said.

He said his bill also would protect police against unfounded accusations.

Sheldon Lineback, executive director of the Missouri Police Chiefs Association, said body cameras are a good idea but shouldn't be imposed by the state.


  New Melle, Crystal City and Troy, Mo. may buy 'body cameras' for police officers 

Chicago technology entrepreneur center 1871 Merchandise Mart

Mayor Rahm Emanuel got a big grant from Obama to build a manufacturing
computer support center. I wonder if it could work without taxpayer
government funding? Or is a welfare grant for incompetent business
managers? Poor people pay more taxes so rich businessmen can collect
those taxes?

Chicago has a private center for new business. Can rent space for $125
to $400 per month. Should be enough.

------------------

http://www.suntimes.com/25789108-761/new-lab-could-bridge-chicagos-manufacturing-past-digital-age.html

harness the potential of big data and supercomputing. operated by UI
Labs, a nonprofit spinoff of the University of Illinois

$70 million grant from the Department of Defense grants and an
additional $250 million in public and private-sector funding

------------------------

http://www.1871.com/

1871 is a co-working center for digital startups. Located in the famed
Merchandise Mart, the 50,000-square-foot facility provides Chicago
startups with affordable workspace and access to mentors, programming,
educational resources, potential investors and a community of
like-minded entrepreneurs.

A new tech hub for startups at Merchandise Mart

1871, a shared work space, offers a collaborative environment for more
than 65 digital ventures

More than 140 people from 65 local startups moved into new digs
Wednesday at 1871, a 50,000-square-foot work space for digital
entrepreneurs at the Merchandise Mart.

The space on the 12th floor can accommodate up to 500 people, or more
than 100 startups, who are seeking flexible terms and a collaborative
environment. Venture capitalist J.B. Pritzker and the state of Illinois
are among the backers of the space

More than 400 startups have applied to rent space in the hub since
mid-January, and 65 have been accepted, with more on the way. Other
tenants include local universities, such as the Illinois Institute of
Technology and the University of Chicago, as well as Chicago-based
investors Hyde Park Angels and Pritzker's New World Ventures. The space
also pulled in corporate sponsorship from CDW, Google and Comcast, among
others.

Amenities at 1871 include an Intelligentsia coffee bar and common areas
for social gatherings, classes and lectures. The calendar for May is
already booked with events such as "hack nights" for female software
developers and workshops on contracts and marketing.

Monthly memberships at 1871 range from $125 to $400, with the highest
level securing a reserved desk and access to all conference rooms.

the typical startup at 1871 has the potential to secure venture funding,
is efficient with capital

Is Something Wrong with Our Modern Diet? Deflation

Food price deflation causes health deflation. 


When looking at the ratio of money spent on store-bought groceries only, Americans spend nearly a fourth of their grocery money on processed foods and sweets—twice as much as they did in 1982—according to Department of Labor statistics.8 Pricing of meats, sugar, and flour has had a great influence our spending habits. These items have actually seen a decrease in price per pound, which has had an inverse effect on Americans' spending habits, in that cheaper prices encourage people to buy more.

The result is obvious. Compared with shoppers 30 years ago, American adults today are twice as likely to be obese, and children and adolescent three times as likely to be overweight. Pediatric type 2 diabetes—which used to be very rare—has markedly increased along with the rise in early childhood obesity. According to previous research, early onset type 2 diabetes appears to be a more aggressive disease from a cardiovascular standpoint.9

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/02/24/modern-diet.aspx?e_cid=20140224Z1_nonbuy_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20140224Z1_nonbuy&et_cid=DM40950&et_rid=436653711

Sunday, February 23, 2014

deer potassium potash New Mexico pure mines

Ron,

I almost hit 4 deer as I drove into the weight room parking lot. They
jumped. In Missouri you can legally take any roadkill deer to prevent
waste of meat. Nice sunny weather here. Feels like spring. Winter
kills molds, fungus, bacteria,.. allergens and disease producing
pathogenic organisms.

I had a real hard workout and got so sore I could barely function for a
couple of days. Slept a lot and only walked 5 miles. Tea reduces
soreness. Seems to work similarly to vitamin C. I am moving more to
tea. Less coffee that has too much caffeine and seems not to help sore
muscles much as tea. Too much caffeine interferes with sleep and thus
healing.

When I was in elementary school I used to carry potash rocks in my
Levi's watch pocket and suck on them. Most people need more potassium
and somehow I sensed that as a kid. We used to hunt rabbits near the
world's purest source of potash so easy to pick up free potash rocks. I
liked geology, math, science and had we stayed in NM TX I would probably
have been an petroleum engineer grew up a little west of the second
President George Bush. As an adult I have sometimes used potassium salt
instead of sodium salt.

Phosphorous is very important in the human body to prevent Arthritis,
etc. Many people get too much salt so are flipped with ratio like 1/16
when they need 16/1 potassium/sodium.
http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/03/05/end-war-on-salt.aspx

I like bananas and avocados and fruits and vegetables in general, good
sources, and don't use much salt.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potash

Potash is a salt that contain potassiums in water-soluble form. The word
"potassium" is derived from potash. Today, potash is produced worldwide,
over 30 million tonnes per year, mostly for fertilizer. The Permian
basin deposit includes the major mines outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico,
to the world's purest potash deposit in Lea County, New Mexico, believed
to be roughly 80% pure.

Re: 50 Reasons We're Living Through the Greatest Period in World History

One reason the rich 1% are getting richer is that they understand social
trends and economic data better. Such understanding has tremendous
value in investments, management, marketing, and business. Usually some
sectors, industries, social groups are doing better than others. Others
are doing worse. You want to invest in the winners and sell the losers.
Or work for the winners and quit the losers. Bring out products that
will be selling, not accumulate on the shelves.

The rich get this understanding from Ivy League colleges, top Business
schools, prep schools, family members in the business, friends,
colleagues, spouses,... Essentially their whole lives training to get
richer. It is hard to break into this club, and getting harder. They
don't want more competition.

Still it is not hard to find good classes in local colleges, trade
associations, and local businesses needing strong people willing to work
to get ahead. Get a copy of US News college rankings, business school
rankings. Figure out what you need to learn to be competitive. I would
not waste time on blogs, TV, radio etc. Get real degrees, licenses to
practice, real people contacts, real work experience....

It is not useful to try to figure out if USA is getting better or worse
on average. This is a nebulous academic argument that depends on
values, models, calculations that require a Phd to do and do not payoff
for you unless you plan to move to a new country that you like better
than USA, cheaper to match the low pay for Phds. MD, Law, business,..
pay much better.

It is much easier and useful to just find a booming industry like
computers that you can invest in, train in, get a job in, start a
company in. There are plenty of success stories in the press every
day. $19,000,000,000 for Whats app texting app for example. The
winners clueless about what is going on outside of their immediate
neighborhood, much less the USA demographic trends, inflation, exchange
rates, debts other than their own,... They don't even like Facebook
that gave them the money.

I do think that it is an interesting question -- whether USA is getting
better or worse off. It is easier to get access to the wide variety of
databases needed to answer this question. More computer power to do the
calculations. Lots of professors working in the field. Easy to make
contacts, take classes, teach classes, go to conferences, maybe even get
some money for research. It has never been easier to do this kind of
research but many do not make the effort. It is easier to get rich.
The skills are easily transferable. It is also easier to get strong and
healthy. I am finding the epidemiology and biochemistry literature is
often accessible and straightforward as to applications (but time
consuming and not as good as it could be). Social and economic trends
are harder to get the needed data and research. Leave that to the rich
-- let the rich lose their shirts fighting each other and hiring ivy
league professors who do not even like the rich and may give them bad
advice just to make them lose money while giving you good advice when
you attend their classes or conferences in private.

Before that most people are unprepared for SHTF. Lack clean water even
in good times and would be dead in a week if SHTF. Clean air, water,
food,... without access to a grocery store? No electricity? Civil
war? Race war? big Terrorist attack? No gas? diesel? Tornado, quake,
hurricane, tsunami, extinction ecosystem collapse. People have a lot of
immediate short term problems to worry about before long term
demographic and economic trends that they will not survive to see and
cannot influence or take much advantage of.

Ron wrote:
> Rich,
>
> The tone of your article suggests that your neighbors' houses
> are burning but at least your hasn't caught fire yet. Or the joke
> about the two men that were pushed off the top floor of a highrise
> building. Halfway down one man turned to the other and asked why he
> was not screaming? "Well so far so good" replied the other. This
> article is a puff piece that ignores the facts. Worse. It is an
> attempt to lull Americans back to sleep when action is needed:
>
> 1) Life expectancy in the US per Wikipidia is now 79.8 years (35th
> directly after Costa Rica). The US is no longer number one in
> longevity. Maybe it is because of those GMO foods and high fructose
> corn syrup, or Donald Rumsfeld's Aspartame that are not allowed in the
> foods in many of the countries with longer lifespans. The US is now
> listed as the most obese country second only to Mexico. Cancer rates
> are skyrocketing (More corporate net profit at the expense of American
> health).
>
> 2) Forego the flu shot and build your immune system instead. Per Dr.
> Russell Blaylock, Dr. Mercola and others AVOID the flu shot. They
> contain mercury, excitotoxins, and other poisons. Many have become
> extremely ill and died as a result of receiving the flu shot. But then
> Big Pharma would lose money.
>
> 5) "The average American now retires at age 62." Not from my
> observations. Let us not confuse "not working anymore" with
> "retirement." Many Americans that do attempt retirement find that
> there money does not go as far as it was projected when they first
> began contributing to their retirements. Of course since the dollar
> has lost 98% of value since the creation of the illegal private "Fed'
> in 1913 that would be a no brainer. Hmmm....lot of 70 year old
> "retired" persons still working at Walmart or at fast food drive thru.
>
> 7) The murder rate HAS gone down dramatically in the last twenty
> years. (except in gun free hell zones like Chicago where the murder
> rate is higher than combat casualties in Iraq or Afghanistan).
> According to Professor John Lott that reduction in murder rates is
> directly attributed to the expanding CCW (concealed weapons permits)
> not more laws or better policing. Remember that as globalist
> politicians with their own larger and larger security teams continue
> to attempt to disarm you despite the facts.
>
> 10) Stagnant like Japan's economy? Why would anyone use a comparison
> with Japan to demonstrate economic well being? Japan has been mired in
> twenty years of deflation and stagnant growth. Unable to devalue the
> Yen with inflation and due to an aging population the Japanese have
> been unable to be competitive. The current Abe administration is
> attempting to inflate away their problems by printing billions in
> unbacked Yen. It is not working. And by the way Japanese unemployment
> is not 5.6% nor is American unemployment near this level. According to
> John Williams' "Shadowstats.com".(Williams is a former comptroller
> general of the US who now devotes himself to educating Americans with
> respect to the false figures being fed to them by the US government
> and the corporate media). American unemployment if figured the way it
> was before 1980 is actually about 23% and growing. (This includes
> U1-U6 levels). No it is not equivalent work if someone leaves a $75.K
> a year job and gets employment at McDonald's as the BLS figures
> assume. People who are leaving the workforce in droves are no longer
> counted as being officially unemployed. This is similar to taking food
> and fuel out of the CPI (consumer price index) to figure inflation
> because no one eats or drives a vehicle .
> Why don't we compare America now to America in the past. Actual
> inflation (not phony official stats) is now about 9% (per
> Shadowstats.com). Youth unemployment about 40% in California. This is
> higher than the "Great Depression" when Americans were more self
> sufficient.
> The US is in debt to the tune of $212. Trillion in long term
> obligations. $17 Trillion in short term obligations if "official
> figures" are to be believed (per Professor Lawrence Kotikoff). This
> does not include bankrupt counties,states, and municipalities, and
> individuals. This is mathematically impossible to pay. It will be
> defaulted away or inflated away. That is about as simple as it I can
> put it (probably under the cover of a contrived war to blame the
> economy on somebody)
> The US has about a thousand military bases worldwide and is losing
> undeclared wars everywhere at a cost of trillions a year. This is
> according to Gerald Celente. Celente is the head of "Trends
> Forecasting"which is widely regarded in business and government
> circles as the most accurate trends analysis and forecasting agency in
> the world.
> Wall Street global banksters have comepletely hijacked Washington
> DC. Not one high level bankster has gone to jail despite massive drug
> money laundering by B of A and others, rigging precious metal prices,
> and falsifying millions of mortgage documents. This is felony fraud
> that is euphemistically called "robo signing" as corporate talking
> "hairdos' on the evening news giggle. US AG Holder stated it might
> "hurt the economy" if we actually prosecuted bankers. "Justice is
> pronounced "just us."
> 12) According to the Federal Reserve "leisure time" rose to 35 years
> in 1990. Why are 24 year old figures being quoted? Let us talk about
> life after the 2008 collapse of the bankster ponzi scheme. By the way
> there is no current recovery. The private and unconstitutional "Fed"
> props up the balance sheets of banks by printing trillions of unbacked
> dollars. Little is actually being manufactured and there is debt
> everywhere.
> There is no recovery-only a coverup.
>
> ***50) We "haven't got it made." But we do have to get our country
> back. It has been hijacked. PS. do not confuse having much
> "entertainment" with "freedom."
>
> BTW-John Mauldin is an excellent economist. His very informative
> interviews can be accessed for free at "KingWorldNews.com".
>
> Ron
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Some upbeat thoughts. I guess you really can't disagree with # 50 or a
> lot of the others......
>
> Rich,
>
> OK, here's the kind of thing */_I_/* like to forward.
>
> This is a free newsletter I get twice weekly. Once a week this fellow
> Mauldin (who I think you would agree with more than disagree) writes
> his own column. The other time, he forwards someone else's column
> that he generally approves of. This is an example of the second type.
> In these cases, Mauldin always provides an introduction and some
> commentary, which may or may not be related (e.g. in this case his
> comments on the Paul Simon concert.) But the real meat here is the
> essay that appears when you scroll down.
>
> CKL
>
>
>
>
> 50 Reasons We're Living Through the Greatest Period in World History
> John Mauldin | Feb 12, 2014
> Exclusive for Accredited Investors - My New Free Letter!
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOi6BI-2ByBjya3Fi8rHnfAFxq9RWNiPXoV0-2FpRAqnCzdP2U_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe7-2F4iXGPrZfJuwhU5-2F3as9pqHvzSw6K-2B-2B6yV4lcyAI-2F0-2Fjx-2BTr-2BUFVAHOq0VKf-2F-2BFJKQuiXvMU64zmZ2afTQI7uoFlduMpXyhe4SbwzhaziqGuUT10OZvwBkSjSXnmOV6OhixlyJ2gQhanissA0xBP-2B-2BIl7wrAmENyw89ByibCDuXV7P9chJLBbtcOBJlDt4Zw-3D-3D>
>
> Missed Last Week's Article?
> Read It Here
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiw4cuS1SqQfCbK1N-2BAM97HHzjVBM-2B1XyaezKWjuhTEMnQkwfYnqMLERzsz79yVpSBA-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe5CkU7wCrHtGuFxwnp8u42FLuE-2Bl898St2NdoFpaSfYGxAvJslsAbPW9xxeDHIIGQFreYmOhmyTkMXWBInfkYkBG-2B-2BgnRhLWKehvVmU8T-2BhkcjsJHTG8H-2BxAlrva8kEMw-2FlCoOgBsdTDGSdbIvT-2FzPV-2BzB1V8djnkbVyB2HEgm19MJbsrY8T1P2fLp6lnKny-2FQ-3D-3D>
>
>
> Yesterday I had a long leisurely lunch with my longtime friend and
> family consigliere Toby Goodman. Leisurely except that your humble
> analyst was allowing a few phone calls to interrupt our precious time.
> "We were having lunch in this very restaurant [Piccolo Mondo in
> Arlington, his favorite haunt] in 1993. You remember what we were
> talking about?" he queried. I had to admit I didn't, I wasn't
> surprised Toby did, because he remembers everything. That's why he's
> my consigliere.
> "I don't either, but I do remember that it was the first time I sat
> with someone who made a phone call during lunch. You brought in this
> big brick of a phone with a long antenna. I'd never seen such a
> device." It's not the Toby doesn't get out – he was in fact a Texas
> state representative and chairman of a few important committees. But
> these phones were pretty brand-new and cutting-edge back then. Twenty
> years ago today (small, subtle hat tip to Paul McCartney and the 50th
> year anniversary of the British Invasion).
> The first iPhone was introduced on June 29, 2007. Yesterday I was
> talking on the fifth version in less than seven years. Things are
> changing rather quickly. Sometimes we get all gloom and doom about the
> world but fail to realize how fast things are actually improving.
> "Today," Matt Ridley writes in his book /The Rational Optimist/, "of
> Americans officially designated as 'poor,' 99 per cent have
> electricity, running water, flush toilets, and a refrigerator; 95 per
> cent have a television, 88 per cent a telephone, 71 per cent a car and
> 70 percent air conditioning. Cornelius Vanderbilt had none of these."
> Today I offer you something fun and refreshing and optimistic for your
> /Outside the Box,/ and I encourage you to pass it on to friends and
> especially to your kids. Morgan Housel over at the Motley Fool has
> written a great piece called "50 Reasons We're Living Through the
> Greatest Period in World History
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkdEzLyuwcsj4N3IGg55iNIsLLyETw1EsOjK3mozx6yCgdFGf6CBqDsmQBF-2B1GB0epPyLm7fC6uuu8kWzcJ722c2g-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXewVYBmLTjBDdYw7JY47E6eIPBnRRp28PrmLZQJqNOmXAmySkLBK6Dhf1UQXuc951yhQwSboMQ-2BTW8drMAS57us-2B7nNoW22IxtufUoFe6XPHxi-2BgBsE8tyS4hjBItwJ4HEBIIdrZWKLemdx7hZZUTjrp1im4p1hf-2B5HHGHiAkZCfEYDvDGRfSMiX6ExaH0Iv7-2FA-3D-3D>."
> Compare health-care improvements with the stuff that gets talked about
> in the news – NBC anchor Andrea Mitchell interrupted a Congresswoman
> last week to announce Justin Bieber's arrest – and you can understand
> why Americans aren't optimistic about the country's direction. We
> ignore the really important news because it happens slowly, but we
> obsess over trivial news because it happens all day long.
> (There is a link early in this piece to another article Morgan wrote
> in the same vein.)
> It's not that there aren't problems aplenty, massive inequalities,
> atrocities everywhere, puerile media coverage, and enough incompetence
> and ignorance in Washington DC and governments in general to
> thoroughly depress you – when you think about it. But sometimes it
> helps to remember that things really are getting better. In 2034, no
> one will want to go back to the good old days of 2014. Trust me.
> Well, maybe the good old days of the music of our youth. I noted last
> week that I was going to the Paul Simon and Sting concert. I was going
> to hear the Paul Simon that I remember growing up and listening to
> every week. As it turned out, Sting ruled the concert. He played to
> his crowd and had them rocking. Paul Simon did a few of his old songs,
> and Sting did a few others with him. But mostly Paul sang some of his
> newer stuff. I could recognize the rhythms that are characteristic of
> his talent – and Paul certainly has talent aplenty, even at 72. But it
> seems he has moved on from his old music and somehow or another
> forgotten to take along most of his audience. The sound was familiar
> but the words got lost there in the huge basketball arena. It was a
> concert made for a small venue where I could hear what he was saying
> and not just listen to the sound.
> It has had me in a pensive mood for a few days, thinking about how we
> as communicators can stay relevant to our audience that expects to
> hear a certain "sound." I think about the reaction to my friend David
> Rosenberg when he turned bullish. There was a certain crowd that
> followed him because he confirmed their bias. Rosie has to be true to
> himself, just as Paul Simon does.
> At the end of the day I think I subscribe to the Ricky Nelson school
> of life – I'm sure you remember his 1985 song "Garden Party
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOi3lL7ydb0vsE-2FwiV7XQ8UgZ5hnSdNo2H5sqV2fFs2rKk8GPkEbQx1gZy-2Fcz0Py8vFw-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXew4vlGIw2m-2F5nRI-2FYpl-2BxIb2RZBocAEh06vWYPD-2B1g2yb6pMZZ3rHsmSqcEYPh-2FGC-2BhmiJqc9BimmAH5ennwneJAea3-2BPkhFjLoaMTgnQm3MOqEpAGiYfi-2BoUpfQ3EJSm6UEzBXvulBL539yO8tgojOg4b1oKDdt2POQrL6hqQK8ok96-2BSAswrsNjf2EewHjgw-3D-3D>":
> "You see, ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself."
> Balancing our feelings about the old with our excitement over the new
> is something we're increasingly going to have to contend with. It will
> keep life interesting.
> Your still wishing I had heard "Sounds of Silence" analyst,
>
> John Mauldin, Editor
> Outside the Box
> JohnMauldin@2000wave.com <mailto:johnmauldin@2000wave.com>
>
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> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiw4cuS1SqQfCbK1N-2BAM97HGv-2BfZPHHhCAhftnkLhCzrOOUxOj0ZvQnuAtev5SdbkxQ-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe1X0rCD1qbzK10gEAG4mdFlc6lM-2Bh-2Bh2WJW7W3Bz2uQyS6-2BV1ZAU2oBqa1dbvltnZAGg4I69bn6dFRTr3RC-2B5B2cactMSoFeiWQDaJlt4beDdp7A6ucAMvyhQH8hxpwXLP4gj2gcDQisfwhY3wxlUIkid7Z1u69byos3-2BXWBLXldbvPk4RRT9nkUohD5iee9ug-3D-3D>
> Each day, you get the three tech news stories
> with the biggest potential impact.
>
>
> *50 Reasons We're Living Through the Greatest Period in World History*
>
> By Morgan Housel
> The Motley Fool
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkdEzLyuwcsj4N3IGg55iNIsLLyETw1EsOjK3mozx6yCgdFGf6CBqDsmQBF-2B1GB0epPyLm7fC6uuu8kWzcJ722c2g-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXeyxM5AcbcH6YXnnMbrOiYQY3f7sCdKA0cbpMtI6CF-2BWQqdYgjMPpcUFlmQKwTe0Pk-2FBK2WNl87OKOxlvqPjmLh4z7luy72KyxYjAMLJ7VMcpEx1LPihh-2B02X0vH20YJdvaHQ0RY4iA9ODVh9JPXHEj765weifST3ZwSR0WLc-2FVq-2BZMeiNvjPBr2C76eOpWjNRQ-3D-3D>
> I recently talked to a doctor who retired after a 30-year career. I
> asked him how much medicine had changed during the three decades he
> practiced. "Oh, tremendously," he said. He listed off a dozen
> examples. Deaths from heart disease and stroke are way down. Cancer
> survival rates are way up. We're better at diagnosing, treating,
> preventing, and curing disease than ever before.
> Consider this: In 1900, 1% of American women giving birth died in
> labor. Today, the five-year mortality rate for localized breast cancer
> is 1.2%. /Being pregnant 100 years ago was almost as dangerous as
> having breast cancer is today. /
> The problem, the doctor said, is that these advances happen slowly
> over time, so you probably don't hear about them. If cancer survival
> rates improve, say, 1% per year, any given year's progress looks low,
> but over three decades, extraordinary progress is made.
> Compare health-care improvements with the stuff that gets talked about
> in the news — NBC anchor Andrea Mitchell interrupted a Congresswoman
> last week to announce Justin Bieber's arrest — and you can understand
> why Americans aren't optimistic about the country's direction. We
> ignore the really important news because it happens slowly, but we
> obsess over trivial news because it happens all day long.
> Expanding on my belief that everything is amazing and nobody is happy
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkdVa2szbvk2cz3FVwtX0lalaoQxQ1WVnbGE-2Br0eu2xham7s2IOVrzE9929Cyfib-2B2f-2BlLNzK1g9H3qPuCm38ldmw-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe4h2AflDrYPKXfmaYkpDONJGnm7I0yEnTbdmZuzf3H1kt-2By2ondrrN12I1iZEw4I0L6v47qSPGPwdvjXk8ocPnrt17JAQBk2C1HhnO-2FvDr5EifkoXjtlZcabzSOhnZyltAm-2B3bLOjrjLwanIbX7NcJMwOVob72V7Ffv4mtDScsTWA6EGanSaHoFGzbii-2BttjoQ-3D-3D>,
> here are 50 facts that show we're actually living through the greatest
> period in world history.
> *1. *U.S. life expectancy at birth was 39 years in 1800, 49 years in
> 1900, 68 years in 1950, and 79 years today. The average newborn today
> can expect to live an entire generation longer than his
> great-grandparents could.
> *2.* A flu pandemic in 1918 infected 500 million people and killed as
> many as 100 million. In his book /The Great Influenza/, John Barry
> describes the illness as if "someone were hammering a wedge into your
> skull just behind the eyes, and body aches so intense they felt like
> bones breaking." Today, you can go to Safeway and get a flu shot. It
> costs 15 bucks. You might feel a little poke.
> *3.* In 1950, 23 people per 100,000 Americans died each year in
> traffic accidents, according to the Census Bureau. That fell to 11 per
> 100,000 by 2009. If the traffic mortality rate had not declined,
> 37,800 more Americans would have died last year than actually did. In
> the time it will take you to read this article, one American is alive
> who would have died in a car accident 60 years ago.
> *4.* In 1949, /Popular Mechanics /magazine made the bold prediction
> that someday a computer could weigh less than 1 ton. I wrote this
> sentence on an iPad that weighs 0.73 pounds.
> *5.* The average American now retires at age 62. One hundred years
> ago, the average American died at age 51. Enjoy your golden years —
> your ancestors didn't get any of them.
> *6*. In his 1770s book /The Wealth of Nations/, Adam Smith wrote: "It
> is not uncommon in the highlands of Scotland for a mother who has
> borne 20 children not to have 2 alive." Infant mortality in America
> has dropped from 58 per 1,000 births in 1933 to less than six per
> 1,000 births in 2010, according to the World Health Organization.
> There are about 11,000 births in America each day, so this improvement
> means more than 200,000 infants now survive each year who wouldn't
> have 80 years ago. That's like adding a city the size of Boise, Idaho,
> every year.
> *7*. America averaged
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOi6K4aYEIl8lNNeIt7FSfxREAJJS-2Bq1xIaWgpb1HxDH9GqL7duNjkrP2cS5mR-2B-2Fe3Qc75uzOl-2FFwj7NUmXt-2FyiaDZu5ydyHspVZNh5zTrcUNzwXcU9Ad1XI2mPPjp1Z5v1g-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe7f4mNGxNcsFcHai6609Qug10qdVpRuJYd10SGtEhyj6VjYk4x5jSxiRGt8p3o3sjw8INzD41D4Bxp1EZIulaWr5856yUZRJL0bC6URvSlEl7dTEJ0fvhTqGwe2RP4T58EKm-2F9EMrTuak1z3svG2-2FKw2vKS2iTX9-2FhdEw7bf1L7r6-2FqTboCPxI-2FjWlIiM5J0ew-3D-3D> 20,919
> murders per year in the 1990s, and 16,211 per year in the 2000s,
> according to the FBI. If the murder rate had not fallen, 47,000 more
> Americans would have been killed in the last decade than actually
> were. That's more than the population of Biloxi, Miss.
> *8.* Despite a surge in airline travel, there were half as many fatal
> plane accidents in 2012 than there were in 1960, according to the
> Aviation Safety Network.
> *9*. No one has died from a new nuclear weapon attack since 1945. If
> you went back to 1950 and asked the world's smartest political
> scientists, they would have told you the odds of seeing that happen
> would be close to 0%. You don't have to be very imaginative to think
> that the most important news story of the past 70 years is what
> /didn't/ happen. Congratulations, world.
> *10*. People worry that the U.S. economy will end up stagnant like
> Japan's. Next time you hear that, remember that
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkd9JqGCIDL3vs-2BxgE5eHSziV4WE-2Bx7cPZ96ug1ML07nGx-2Bc0qQbjzswMVziqBQEfVDgIuFhtbvsf3EiBF3EbnfpA-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe4o-2F-2BvmhnLlk91pJxqFma1DjFByfEqZNeUSvgFHVISMkgW2QUSh3yGqtykzQoR8nL-2FH7PMqHbEDtkhuvKWO8H6B6Ukuvm1NYH68TRY4JAGZTuk2o7ODejUUdiE4vd-2BCJmciBjIlkrwvdIEkehCfuh6p-2Fi5wFctwXP2owCUxYu1Jh3O2SgiG6EZYdLIEWEhj1Uw-3D-3D> unemployment
> in Japan hasn't been above 5.6% in the past 25 years, its government
> corruption ranking has consistently improved, incomes per capita
> adjusted for purchasing power have grown at a decent rate, and life
> expectancy has risen by nearly five years. I can think of worse scenarios.
> *11*. Two percent of American homes had electricity in 1900. J.P
> Morgan (the man) was one of the first to install electricity in his
> home, and it required a private power plant on his property. Even by
> 1950, close to 30% of American homes didn't have electricity. It
> wasn't until the 1970s that virtually all homes were powered. Adjusted
> for wage growth, electricity cost more than 10 times as much in 1900
> as it does today, according to professor Julian Simon.
> *12*. According to the Federal Reserve, the number of lifetime years
> spent in leisure — retirement plus time off during your working years
> — rose from 11 years in 1870 to 35 years by 1990. Given the rise in
> life expectancy, it's probably close to 40 years today. Which is
> amazing: /The average American spends nearly half his life in leisure.
> /If you had told this to the average American 100 years ago, that
> person would have considered you wealthy beyond imagination.
> *13*. We are having a national discussion about whether a
> $7.25-per-hour minimum wage is too low. But even adjusted for
> inflation, the minimum wage was
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=nFaCI5KuC6GcgxkBbT-2FjvYM7T2lcw2L1-2BigV4X0ledFtP8bA6Cv-2FUiUizoJb374U9jXWfONfNwi8UofrU4t3Mw-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe30dsHdrQMraRbLO5qbw97w53tdJDA1ZFP2waA9dB1n-2ByJomGpsaYeFTpjbP2F99dLJfZj3SkS9DnnMXVpqZrEe5Kj45oJwnLNkaga4ufq7QaSFqs0IOHWVXOEuTqW6IN8rdTzIzG7oiTBT3yGjLmt4E7KlCstHa6QZqV1z-2BHfdIE-2B4-2BxuavH7oh-2FWlR-2FCA90Q-3D-3D> less
> than $4 per hour as recently as the late 1940s. The top 1% have
> captured most of the wage growth over the past three decades, but
> nearly everyone has grown richer — much richer — during the past seven
> decades.
> *14.* In 1952, 38,000 people contracted polio in America alone,
> according to the Centers for Disease Control. In 2012, there were
> fewer than 300 reported cases of polio /in the entire world./
> *15*. From 1920 to 1949, an average of 433,000 people died each year
> globally from "extreme weather events." That figure has plunged to
> 27,500 per year, according to Indur Goklany of the International
> Policy Network, largely thanks to "increases in societies' collective
> adaptive capacities."
> *16*. Worldwide deaths from battle have plunged from 300 per 100,000
> people during World War II, to the low teens during the 1970s, to less
> than 10 in the 1980s, to fewer than one in the 21st century, according
> to Harvard professor Steven Pinker. "War really is going out of
> style," he says.
> *17*. Median household income adjusted for inflation was
> around $25,000 per year during the 1950s. It's nearly double that
> amount today. We have false nostalgia about the prosperity of the
> 1950s because our definition of what counts as "middle class" has been
> inflated — see
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkduhl8w51xHHSZplC-2Fn3HS8DLox-2B4Xe7c3RjEmnsSND6lH8-2FxYGTENoHzyyNmh7ZBec-2B-2FnLc30-2FZCDxJew-2FYpwUg-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe3uZe27H1J9NHCexjrSzRUBR5c4i52AL6yfSH7pJi-2BF3bpzjDFrIL-2BvjY9xHhyhLwjjPdpuj8J9G8fNB-2F6TsVr-2BtRtGmExYXDJ5O502fso7gLqokrqLwYiE06tV95F5MoKf-2FxnpOB3-2Fr3vwyxFbtqU0qyChk-2BFG5y4ujnxjTdqfovThuiio4IoIXBZVdc4-2Bjtw-3D-3D> the
> 34% rise in the size of the median American home in just the past 25
> years. If you dig into how the average "prosperous" American family
> lived in the 1950s, I think you'll find a standard of living we'd call
> "poverty" today.
> *18. *Reported rape per 100,000 Americans dropped from 42.3 in 1991 to
> 27.5 in 2010, according to the FBI. Robbery has dropped from 272 per
> 100,000 in 1991 to 119 in 2010. There were nearly 4 million fewer
> property crimes in 2010 than there were in 1991, which is amazing when
> you consider the U.S. population grew by 60 million during that period.
> *19.* According to the Census Bureau, only one in 10 American homes
> had air conditioning in 1960. That rose to 49% in 1973, and 89% today
> — the 11% that don't are mostly in cold climates. Simple improvements
> like this have changed our lives in immeasurable ways.
> *20.* Almost no homes had a refrigerator in 1900, according to
> Frederick Lewis Allan's /The Big Change/, let alone a car. Today they
> sell cars with refrigerators
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=BFE7dj73p1Qm4QbtiQkjwjlr4FI-2FQ0w8p-2F5DhnrsPX0qyqcS0XdOnvURYugPDecuAEnjFBcGNZ77JHns-2FHhqGT-2F778z4PIuMPpv1vf12vcs-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe0WYroKkZfp-2BU5cBiVZoFw0RfUzMi5AiTL-2Fw61u0MpwpXrTObUyaDgEIXCUMwFgPqfs0LMXgyZxSmLkGvcZsGrP1zc2wq8901Cfd-2F0RgppwAK0Vxw2-2BjE42PJpoYHi9OwWd4Rutp39g9BKE0oxor6dSmRLXkoKf0zDvtVcRkGMCZGDG9Ftp5fG4cGMmHyG2aNw-3D-3D> in
> them.
> *21.* Adjusted for overall inflation, the cost of an average
> round-trip airline ticket fell 50% from 1978 to 2011, according
> to Airlines for America.
> *22.* According to the Census Bureau, the average new home now has
> more bathrooms than occupants.
> *23*. According to the Census Bureau, in 1900 there was one housing
> unit for every five Americans. Today, there's one for every three. In
> 1910 the average home had 1.13 occupants per room. By 1997 it was down
> to 0.42 occupants per room.
> *24*. According to professor Julian Simon, the average American house
> or apartment is twice as large as the average house or apartment in
> Japan, and three times larger than the average home or apartment in
> Russia.
> *25.* Relative to hourly wages, the cost of an average new car has
> fallen fourfold since 1915, according to professor Julian Simon.
> *26.* Google Maps is free. If you think about this for a few moments,
> it's really astounding. It's probably the single most useful piece of
> software ever invented, and it's free for anyone to use.
> *27.* High school graduation rates are at a 40-year high, according to
> Education Week.
> *28*. The death rate from strokes has declined by 75% since the 1960s,
> according to the National Institutes of Health. Death from heart
> attacks has plunged, too: If the heart attack survival had had not
> declined since the 1960s, the number of Americans dying each year from
> heart disease would be more than 1 million higher than it currently is.
> *29.* In 1900, African Americans had an illiteracy rate of nearly 45%,
> according to the Census Bureau. Today, it's statistically close to zero.
> *30*. People talk about how expensive college is today, but a century
> ago fewer than one in 20 Americans ever stepped foot in a university.
> College wasn't an option at any price for some minorities because of
> segregation just six decades ago.
> *31.* The average American work week has declined from 66 hours in
> 1850, to 51 hours in 1909, to 34.8 today, according to the Federal
> Reserve. Enjoy your weekend.
> *32.* Incomes have grown so much faster than food prices that the
> average American household now spends less than half
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=WwG6JaTaSzYNm1xBXK2E7LT0P5A8ZrYWjSUGjyCKRg27-2FpzDhkSYuLA0UpXoFmoCPlhdMGDcoGZfQNyfumMSjw-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe7Qi1Dnf-2BQyP-2FIZiy1Zsy4yJQXpjLB7Lh6-2BDDexGNq0fnIE8asVNh1QwZTgzUiUAnLKFUAuGRo15LMBDB3mfiefOXxXnEoDqfuvOBx9syJMS1Ntw20duyPPw077FB-2B65O4GHkGU2Gl2CXeZjcheOvFOdUqtE88pHAqu5Nyarx3jFSI8RZj7RuS-2BYTBQ8k-2BRvGg-3D-3D> as
> much of its income on food as it did in the 1950s. Relative to wages,
> the price of food has declined more than 90% since the 19th century,
> according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
> *33.* As of March 2013, there were 8.99 million millionaire households
> in the U.S., according to the Spectrum Group. Put them together and
> they would make the largest city in the country, and the 18th largest
> city
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=UU9rSsolDPv1oxGnu8Y6-2BvwT-2FS3C8Js6i8P-2Bp3yyRwLlyys0tSJr3ji36VfWyW9Re7xpROMgwMSWYftnl1CxO7L1EBYBxrvjWhcjN0A5vZ4-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe9K2rzYuz-2F2bm28lu2c7Q9ZDUWcCc9F75lLXro3u0ejIF4W8mw87SQedNcZTfA5rfgCEyuktZbfZ3dxwDJQHHilJtwV-2FPBAR9DZSCBmESsZRrg7Y9nsM2wxa5pPuyNzC9OEhcMJhiPMk0C-2BbWTnkZJgoak69AjdL7csNIz-2BshWYnhKsOOFb1kFlo45d9SyIeaA-3D-3D> in
> the world, just behind Tokyo. We talk a lot about wealth concentration
> in the United States, but it's not just the very top that has done well.
> *34.* More than 40% of adults smoked in 1965, according to the Centers
> for Disease Control. By 2011, 19% did.
> *35.* In 1900, 44% of all American jobs were in farming. Today, around
> 2% are. We've become so efficient at the basic need of feeding
> ourselves that nearly half the population can now work on other stuff.
> *36.* One of the reasons Social Security and Medicare are underfunded
> is that the average American is living longer than ever before. I
> think this is literally the best problem to have.
> *37.* In 1940, less than 5% of the adult population held a bachelor's
> degree or higher. By 2012, more than 30% did, according to the Census
> Bureau.
> *38*. U.S. oil production in September was the highest it's been
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOi0rm0vpRLfhZvxbiJIYvJKjcUwDos1aTS8dkfb4Fv-2B46fwAufRwXSC4t8cob-2FILbTBZpdhiFSkl3OgUsnIGsYxI-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXe97UQrgANtq8-2B-2FQY6kYd54HOJWctWqhH607TOha2FVOI-2FP175fyWXU9Mp8D-2BeYbg4rmwcjUu5eoKe0FobtOdlEZQM4KXzkUnzCOs3I8j-2BQYGrXJCLwjee4L8txOfU42UwruhycRpzXFxUq9-2F783BKoduOQQ7AxaaYKgcEKxjTLltCNB0IqChcEgn-2BDQQRYwnNA-3D-3D> since
> 1989, and growth shows no sign of slowing. We produced 57% more oil in
> America in September 2013 than we did in September 2007. The
> International Energy Agency projects that America will be the world's
> largest oil producer as soon as 2015.
> *39.* The average American car got 13 miles per gallon in 1975, and
> more than 26 miles per gallon in 2013, according to the Energy
> Protection Agency. This has an effect identical to cutting the cost of
> gasoline in half.
> *40.* Annual inflation in the United States hasn't been above 10%
> since 1981 and has been below 5% in 77% of years over the past seven
> decades. When you consider all the hatred directed toward the Federal
> Reserve, this is astounding.
> *41.* The percentage of Americans age 65 and older who live in poverty
> has dropped
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=WwG6JaTaSzYNm1xBXK2E7DqKV7wNbzuno8-2FenUU13UIUWI3MRwNIv7j9EQ7pDZNrQNeiVPqV8zwwy0IDltq0-2BA2p3NKJb49YBF7fu0nDz7Y-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXez-2F-2FO6Mv0Wtl2KfPdz-2B5x-2F3QNL7V9tFW7CQC18VbZ6-2F157jQAseODPkiQYBvcXXUxw8eAulNeN3Tf8UgID9g9G-2Bzj7UtCI3t5Wi7uX8k3VsKNQyVunakONJNJroc8FapFGETffYtTOu3VjYtLGz6KUtXoCTzPrSAjXHvYLcqfP-2BtK-2FI76cc4Jbg1Gy-2Bh-2Fxsnyw-3D-3D> from
> nearly 30% in 1966 to less than 10% by 2010. For the elderly, the war
> on poverty has pretty much been won.
> *42.* Adjusted for inflation, the average monthly Social Security
> benefit for retirees has increased from $378 in 1940 to $1,277 by
> 2010. What used to be a safety net is now a proper pension.
> *43.* If you think Americans aren't prepared for retirement today, you
> should have seen what it was like a century ago. In 1900, 65% of men
> over age 65 were still in the labor force. By 2010, that figure was
> down to 22%. The entire concept of retirement is unique to the past
> few decades. Half a century ago, most Americans worked until they died.
> *44*. From 1920 to 1980, an average of 395 people per 100,000 died
> from famine worldwide each decade. During the 2000s, that fell to
> three per 100,000, according to The/Economist/.
> *45*. The cost of solar panels has declined by 75% since 2008,
> according to the Department of Energy. Last I checked, the sun is
> offering its services for free.
> *46.* As recently as 1950, nearly 40% of American homes didn't have a
> telephone. Today, there are 500 million Internet-connected devices in
> America, or enough for 5.7 per household.
> *47*. According to *AT&T* archives and the Dallas Fed, a three-minute
> phone call from New York to San Francisco cost $341 in 1915, and
> $12.66 in 1960, adjusted for inflation. Today, Republic Wireless
> offers unlimited talk, text, and data for $5 a month.
> *48.* In 1990, the American auto industry produced 7.15 vehicles per
> auto employee. In 2010 it produced 11.2 vehicles per employee.
> Manufacturing efficiency has improved dramatically.
> *49.* You need an annual income of
> <http://email.mauldineconomics.com/wf/click?upn=U8GusXYvzQrI-2BTfpBInOiwam2UZcrBptTbUMrOcvo-2BY5Nrk2SZOh1NAyovbFTQkd-2BEURBv1PTbVXuLBoBZVEL4pON7t-2Fey0u7-2Bjx6ubLC8KPc-2BCk603TWtwIAxJRFKnUtObdRscL15JOr9EnUWX-2BLg-3D-3D_zgjsoFwxzXvDYzPjZtfsR8-2FrklU1lxK30vk58JXjoUTg1Rero6oLopo8rFehlFApPv60gTGRpg2Zp1pIJ2sXezSCpZRcDP7sUcN-2FE19TFNgJevZ1LDTQLNay7-2BpWj-2B3DpKj-2B0KTseo4SZB6JyfoihuKS1wm08wg5t1pmA7kQzNpjnbbYDnK-2Bg8-2FHCvLE5tsILcXo15q45B2TCNndGXnwB6F-2FZm5nqedLGFMJKIL8UlKrfLi3I1r85E-2FE-2F63PCM2hNGDUo4IO6zqsQmJvihRw2Q-3D-3D> $34,000
> a year to be in the richest 1% of the world, according to World Bank
> economist Branko Milanovic's 2010 book /The Haves and the Have-Nots/.
> To be in the top half of the globe you need to earn just $1,225 a
> year. For the top 20%, it's $5,000 per year. Enter the top 10% with
> $12,000 a year. To be included in the top 0.1% requires an annual
> income of $70,000. America's poorest are some of the world's richest.
> *50.* Only 4% of humans get to live in America. Odds are you're one of
> them. We've got it made. Be thankful.
>