Thursday, February 28, 2013

invention: Obama phone for the poor + tablet computer + bank computer

John,

I keep the phone below plugged in at all times. Everybody needs anold phone for 911 SHTF that works without external power. Cheap, solid, reliable even if your electricity goes off. New version needs to be stainless steel and grounded to prevent cancer. Should be 100%made in USA. Peoplepay for the cost of phone and 10 cents per minute per call911 or their immediate family or companies. Companies can call people at times scheduled by text on thetablet computer. Stainless steel phone plugs into a stainless steel plug computer on the wall phone jackthat monitors the phone line and connects to another plug computer plugged into a 110V power socketthat also has a line in from cable TV internet.

The big 110V plug computer caches / encrypts / decrypts/ monitors traffic to the tablet and bank computers, both of which are also stainlesssteel and use 12 point courier font 8 bit ascii black font on white screen e-ink.

The tablet computer has all your warranties and product documentation for everything you ever bought. Also has ads for products you might wantand software to add those products to your shopping cart. You can add to your cartstuff from vendors you have a relationship with. You can text companies you have a relationship with or your immediate family for a few cents per textcost. Similarly companies can text you for a feeif they are on your contact list.

The bank computer you use to pay for everything and vote. You sell your personal data to vendors who you want to have a relationship with. You vote on the bank computer (not real elections, just monthly polls). This stainless steel bank computer fits inside a waterproof case that locks securely to the drain plumbing under your sink using master lock that has the same key as the front door to your home. Better yet, store your bank computer in the bank post office box along with your will, birth certificate, etc. Pay your bills once per month using the secure bank connection while drinking Starbucks coffee and socializing with bankerswho can sell you gold coins and stocksfor additional fees.

Youcarry one card that is a debit card unless you hit a credit button in which case it uses the credit card you pre-specified on your bank computer. No more club cards -- they are all in the database for your one card. Don't give anybody any information unless they fill out a formal request that you receive on your steel bank computer. They rent your information on a year-to-year basis. The FBI checks to make sure their databases have only information they paid your for and that they remove information after they quit paying you for it. Your bank keeps all your information -- birth certificate, income, taxes, medical records, product purchases, licenses, permits, etc. It is a standard database job. Business loves this arrangement because the bank verifies all information that it is accurateand up to date. Your one card is also your drivers license, hunting license, concealed carry permit, etc. Move toward biometric identification and then toss the one card.

Joe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Model_500_telephone

Millions of model 500-series phones were produced and were present in almost every home in North America. Many are still in use today because to their durability and ample availability. Its modular construction simplified manufacture and repair, and facilitated a large number of variants with added features.
[gallery]

invention: Obama phone for the poor + tablet computer + bank computer

Model500

I keep my old black rotary dial phone plugged in at all times. Everybody needs an old phone for 911 SHTF scenarios that works without external power. Cheap, solid, reliable even if your electricity goes off. A new version needs to be stainless steel and grounded to prevent cancer. Should be 100% made in USA. People pay for the cost of phone and 10 cents per minute per call 911 or their immediate family or companies. Companies can call people at times scheduled by text on the tablet computer. Stainless steel phone plugs into a stainless steel plug computer on the wall phone jack that monitors the phone line and connects to another plug computer plugged into a 110V power socket that also has a line in from cable TV internet.

The big 110V plug computer caches / encrypts / decrypts / monitors traffic to the tablet and bank computers, both of which are also stainless steel and use 12 point courier font 8 bit ascii black font on white screen e-ink.

The tablet computer has all your warranties and product documentation for everything you ever bought. Also has ads for products you might want and software to add those products to your shopping cart. You can add to your cart stuff from vendors you have a relationship with. You can text companies you have a relationship with or your immediate family for a few cents per text cost. Similarly companies can text you for a fee if they are on your contact list.

The bank computer you use to pay for everything and vote. You sell your personal data to vendors who you want to have a relationship with. You vote on the bank computer (not real elections, just monthly polls). This stainless steel bank computer fits inside a waterproof case that locks securely to the drain plumbing under your sink using master lock that has the same key as the front door to your home. Better yet, store your bank computer in the bank post office box along with your will, birth certificate, etc. Pay your bills once per month using the secure bank connection while drinking Starbucks coffee and socializing with bankers who can sell you gold coins and stocks for additional fees.

You carry one card that is a debit card unless you hit a credit button in which case it uses the credit card you pre-specified on your bank computer. No more club cards -- they are all in the database for your one card. Don't give anybody any information unless they fill out a formal request that you receive on your steel bank computer. They rent your information on a year-to-year basis. The FBI checks to make sure their databases have only information they paid your for and that they remove information after they quit paying you for it. Your bank keeps all your information -- birth certificate, income, taxes, medical records, product purchases, licenses, permits, etc. It is a standard database job. Business loves this arrangement because the bank verifies all information that it is accurate and up to date. Your one card is also your drivers license, hunting license, concealed carry permit, etc. Move toward biometric identification and then toss the one card.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

bank shop vote network gizmo cold minnesota

I am inventing a new cheap electronic gizmo for people's homes that does online banking, shopping, voting, social networking while preventing so much hacking, stealing, scamming, and identity theft while being more robust in case of catastrophe. It is both electrical and social engineering. A big challenge. It is my popular bookthat reads like science fiction but is serious and practical. There will be numerous related patents that I may or may not bother to file for. In October 1962 I built a computer with a mouse and graphical interface 20 years before Apple Steve Jobs. 30 years ago in July 1983 I wrote a paper "the home information center of the future" for Professor Nicosia Consumer Behavior Marketing Class at UC Berkeley (I got an A+) that I submitted to the Harvard Business Review but it was rejected. I am sitting here typing this on my Apple iMac that is what I drew by hand to represent the hardware. Hopefully it will not take 20 or 30 years to get the next needed technology into people's homes. But I am impressed with how long it takes for professors and business people to get anything done.

I should be in Hawaii right now but am staying to help a group put together an website, a dumb decision on my part. It is hi 90 in Hawaii but hi 39 in Missouri and mostly cloudy. We got 2 inches of snow this winter so far. I can exercise more vigorously in cold weather without overheating. I got in some terrific walks up and down hills and weightlifting workouts. I am quite sore but don't notice it if I sit or lie motionless. I am gaining 1 pound per week, mostly muscle. I sometimes sleep 12 hours per dayto help recovery. And drink extra tea and take extra Vitamin C. I feel a lot better with proper exercise. I need a lot of time in bed thinking over all the wiring needed for my new electronic gizmo.

In March I will probably drive to Houston, Galveston, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Pensacola to talk to people and investigate possibly moving there. Huge, hot, smoggy, multicultural areas but Rice University is very good in many fields. Numerous interesting universities and the headquarters for the most important academic journal that I want to write for soon. I don't know if I can prepare a seminar in 3 weeks. I really enjoy Houston and other parts of Texas. Houston about 26% white nonhispanics -- the red dots in the maphttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Race_and_ethnicity_2010-_Houston.png

But probably I will be moving to Minneapolis this year as soon as it warms up. At leastvisit for a month or two to see if it is inhabitable. 40 below zero is not unusual, and it stays below freezing for months. Some areas require speaking Hmong, Eubonics, Jazz or some other language that I don't care to learn. Mostly the intellectual environment. I have followed their vector autoregressions, computable general equilibrium models, etc. for decades. Very closely resembling some of my own work. Birds of a feather should flock together. Minnesota is tied for #1 in health and K-12 education. More livable than Hyde Park Chicago ghetto or the Yale New Haven ghetto.

bank shop vote network gizmo cold minnesota

I am inventing a new cheap electronic gizmo for people's homes that does online banking, shopping, voting, social networking while preventing so much hacking, stealing, scamming, and identity theft while being more robust in case of catastrophe. It is both electrical and social engineering. A big challenge. It is my popular book that reads like science fiction but is serious and practical. There will be numerous related patents that I may or may not bother to file for. In October 1962 I built a computer with a mouse and graphical interface 20 years before Apple Steve Jobs. 30 years ago in July 1983 I wrote a paper "the home information center of the future" for Professor Nicosia Consumer Behavior Marketing Class at UC Berkeley (I got an A+) that I submitted to the Harvard Business Review but it was rejected. I am sitting here typing this on my Apple iMac that is what I drew by hand to represent the hardware. Hopefully it will not take 20 or 30 years to get the next needed technology into people's homes. But I am impressed with how long it is for professors and business people to get anything done.

I should be in Hawaii right now but am staying to help a group put together an website, a dumb decision on my part. It is hi 90 in Hawaii but hi 39 in Missouri and mostly cloudy. We got 2 inches of snow this winter so far. I can exercise more vigorously in cold weather without overheating. I got in some terrific walks up and down hills and weightlifting workouts. I am quite sore but don't notice it if I sit or lie motionless. I am gaining 1 pound per week, mostly muscle. I sometimes sleep 12 hours per day to help recovery. And drink extra tea and take extra Vitamin C. I feel a lot better with proper exercise. I need a lot of time in bed thinking over all the wiring needed for my new electronic gizmo.

In March I will probably drive to Houston, Galveston, Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Pensacola to talk to people and investigate possibly moving there. Huge, hot, smoggy, multicultural areas but Rice University is very good. Numerous interesting universities and the headquarters for the most important academic journal that I want to write for soon. I don't know if I can prepare a seminar in 3 weeks. I really enjoy Houston and other parts of Texas. Houston about 26% white nonhispanics -- the red dots in the map http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8a/Race_and_ethnicity_2010-_Houston.png

But probably I will be moving to Minneapolis this year as soon as it warms up. At least visit for a month or two to see if it is inhabitable. 40 below zero is not unusual, and it stays below freezing for months. Some areas require speaking Hmong, Eubonics, Jazz or some other language that I don't care to learn. Mostly the intellectual environment. I have followed their vector autoregressions, computable general equilibrium models, etc. for decades. Very closely resembling some of my own work. Birds of a feather should flock together. Minnesota is tied for #1 in health and K-12 education.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Why can't Americans vote online?

If the internet is too unsafe for voting then why the push to do more banking and shopping online? E-statements, etc.


In an era when virtually every daily task can be done on the Internet, why can't we vote online, too?

The answer depends on whom you ask.

via Why can't Americans vote online? - CNN.com.

Monday, February 25, 2013

budget cuts, finally? Obama miscalculation of neo-con war-mongers draft-dodgers

I don't have a TV and don't have time to read much news except for the NY Times and Bloomberg, but it looks like the grass roots Republicans are going to force Obama to make the 10% across the board budget cuts. NY Times says Obama never thought the fading neo-con war-monger draft-dodger Republican establishment would tolerate drastic cuts. It will be interesting to watch all the sob stories of how vital government services are being cut because Republicans won't raise taxes on the rich. We will get to see who is really benefiting from government spending by who yelps the most. Price of gasoline will fall as politician and government fat-cat bureaucrats get their flying budgets cut. Price of houses in over-inflated Washington DC Virginia Maryland will also fall as some of those fat-cats get fired and have to move out leading to vacancies, less construction, and fewer illegal immigrants. Also less demand for illegal alien maids, cooks, gardeners... Seems to be many benefits from budget cuts. If the economy does not fall out of bed might budget cuts become an annual affair?

http://nyti.ms/124OOWC NYTimes: Budget Impasse Signals a Shift in G.O.P.’s Focus. Republicans are now ready to stand their ground on automatic spending cuts that will strike hard at the military, underscoring what some say was a major miscalculation on the part of President Obama. the fiscal stalemate is highlighting a significant shift in the Republican Party: lawmakers most keenly dedicated to shrinking the size of government are now more dominant than the bloc committed foremost to a robust national defense, particularly in the House. “Republicans aren’t cookie cutter,” he said, “but we do agree on the basic premise of where we’re trying to go. And if we don’t get our fiscal house in order, it’s very hard to provide for the defense of the nation.” cuts about to fall on the Pentagon, totaling $43 billion for the 2013 fiscal year. Because the Defense Department will have only seven months to put them into effect and because military personnel are protected, military training, weapons acquisition and maintenance stand to be cut by 13 percent. rank-and-file Republicans adamant that they would rather see the cuts stand than raise any taxes

http://www.creators.com/opinion/phyllis-schlafly/battle-for-control-of-the-republican-party-begins.html Today, we call these me-too Republicans RINOs (Republicans In Name Only). It's time to revive the famous words of the late Senator Everett Dirksen refuting the Establishment: "We followed you before, and you led us down the road to defeat." Fortunately, we are seeing an emergence of a new Reagan Republican Party. In 2010 and 2012, Republicans elected some real conservatives to the Senate after defeating Establishment candidates in the primaries. It's time for the grassroots to take control of the Republican Party away from the elitists who want to choose our candidates, tell them what to say and how to vote.

Sunday, February 24, 2013

mortality rate and body mass index. Gained 14 pounds in 14 weeks.

I gained 14 pounds in 14 weeks of weightlifting, about a pound a week lifting 2-3 times per week to allow time for recovery. This tips me into a higher mortality rate category according to the study below of 1.5 million white adults. But most of the subjects in the study were heavy due to fat, not muscle. Weight gain by adding muscle is probably very healthy. Not addressed in the study. The attached chart shows that the body mass index BMI is not a great measure of body fat percentage BF.

I am just lifting light weights and allowing time to recover. That is all that is needed to stack on muscle. Signal the muscles to grow. I can feel the difference. Much more solid and easier to do daily activities even though am somewhat sore and sleep more.

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1000367

1.47 for a BMI of 15.0 to 18.4
1.14 for a BMI of 18.5 to 19.9
1.00 for a BMI of 20.0 to 22.4
1.13 for a BMI of 25.0 to 29.9
1.44 for a BMI of 30.0 to 34.9
1.88 for a BMI of 35.0 to 39.9
2.51 for a BMI of 40.0 to 49.9


Type into the google search bar formulas such as the below to calculate your BMI:

Approx now with winter clothes: 23.6= 703 * 151/ (67)^2

14 weeks ago approx: 20.8= 703 * 133/ (67)^2

mathrm{BMI} = frac{text{mass}(text{kg})}{left(text{height}(text{m})right)^2}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Body_mass_index

he body mass index (BMI), or Quetelet index, is a measure for human body shape based on an individual's weight and height. It was devised between 1830 and 1850 by the Belgian polymath Adolphe Quetelet during the course of developing "social physics". Body mass index is defined as the individual's body mass divided by the square of their height. The formulae universally used in medicine produce a unit of measure of kg/m2. BMI can also be determined using a BMI chart,[3] which displays BMI as a function of weight (horizontal axis) and height (vertical axis) using contour lines for different values of BMI or colors for different BMI categories. The factor for UK/US units is more precisely 703.06957964

Correlation_between_BMI_and_Percent_Body_Fat_for_Men_in_NCHS'_NHANES_1994_Data

coffee, tea, vitamin C, Linus Pauling, Viking teeth healthier than USA

I am reducing coffee and tea to 2 cups per day. Too much is too stimulating. Too much Vitamin C is also too stimulating. Linus Pauling was a Vitamin C enthusiast. His institute in Oregon is still doing research on related topics. Vitamin C 400mg seems to be enough for young healthy people. More for the elderly, the sick, and the stressed. I sometimes go up to 1000mg but don't feel right if I go above that. I am gaining 1 pound per week for the last 14 weeks by weightlifting and eating lots of peanuts. I feel much stronger but am somewhat sore, tired and sleep more. If I move back to UCLA I may try to get a job as a movie star. Too bad I didn't get that idea when I was a teenager hanging out on Santa Monica beach with Arnold Schwarzenegger. http://www.centralcasting.com/

Interesting article below on the Vikings. They had good teeth due to their their sugar-free and grain-free diet. Many problems can be prevented by traditional diets and lifestyles. Maybe eating orange peelings is better than Vitamin C pills. I put citrus peel into my tea and feel better unless that citrus peel has too much pesticides on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_pauling Pauling was descended from Prussian farmers, who had immigrated to a German settlement in Concordia, Missouri. Pauling's mother was of English/Scottish descent. Pauling was raised as a member of the Lutheran Church. One of the most influential chemists in history and ranks among the most important scientists of the 20th century. Pauling was included in a list of the 20 greatest scientists of all time by the magazine New Scientist, with Albert Einstein being the only other scientist from the 20th century on the list. Millennium Essay in Nature claimed that Pauling was one of the greatest thinkers and visionaries of the millennium, along with Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. Pauling was one of the founders of the fields of quantum chemistry and molecular biology. Pauling is the only person to be awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes. At Caltech, Pauling struck up a close friendship with theoretical physicist Robert Oppenheimer. The two men planned to mount a joint attack on the nature of the chemical bond. Their relationship soured when Pauling began to suspect that Oppenheimer was becoming too close to his wife. During the beginning of the Manhattan Project, Robert Oppenheimer invited him to be in charge of the Chemistry division of the project, but he declined, not wanting to uproot his family. Pauling's work on vitamin C in his later years generated much controversy. Pauling took 3 grams of vitamin C every day to prevent colds. In 1996, the Linus Pauling Institute moved to Oregon State University, where it continues to conduct research on micronutrients, phytochemicals (chemicals from plants), and other constituents of the diet in preventing and treating disease. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/ vitamin C levels in plasma and circulating cells become fully saturated at intakes of about 400 mg/day in young, healthy nonsmokers. These observations are consistent with other data that intakes of about 400 mg/day are associated with reduced risk of heart disease. vitamin C requirements are increased in the elderly. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_C_megadosage

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/02/24/172688806/ancient-chompers-were-healthier-than-ours

Prehistoric humans didn't have toothbrushes. They didn't have floss or toothpaste, and they certainly didn't have Listerine. Yet somehow, their mouths were a lot healthier than ours are today. "Hunter-gatherers had really good teeth," says Alan Cooper, director of the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA. "But as soon as you get to farming populations, you see this massive change. Huge amounts of gum disease. And cavities start cropping up." And thousands of years later, we're still waging, and often losing, our war against oral disease.

Our changing diets are largely to blame. In a study published in the latest Nature Genetics, Cooper and his research team looked at calcified plaque on ancient teeth from 34 prehistoric human skeletons. What they found was that as our diets changed over time — shifting from meat, vegetables and nuts to carbohydrates and sugar — so too did the composition of bacteria in our mouths. Not all oral bacteria are bad. In fact, many of these microbes help us by protecting against more dangerous pathogens. However, the researchers found that as prehistoric humans transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming, certain types of disease-causing bacteria that were particularly efficient at using carbohydrates started to win out over other types of "friendly" bacteria in human mouths. The addition of processed flour and sugar during the Industrial Revolution only made matters worse. "What you've really created is an ecosystem which is very low in diversity and full of opportunistic pathogens that have jumped in to utilize the resources which are now free," Cooper says. And that's a problem, because the dominance of harmful bacteria means that our mouths are basically in a constant state of disease. "You're walking around with a permanent immune response, which is not a good thing," says Cooper. "It causes problems all over the place." In addition to oral disease, those problems may include diabetes, obesity and even heart disease. Bacteria make up approximately 90 percent of the cells in our bodies.

vikingskull

coffee, tea, vitamin C, Linus Pauling, Viking teeth healthier than USA

I am reducing coffee and tea to 2 cups per day. Too much is too stimulating. Too much Vitamin C is also too stimulating. Your friend Linus Pauling was a Vitamin C enthusiast. His institute in Oregon is still doing research on related topics. Vitamin C 400mg seems to be enough for young healthy people. More for the elderly, the sick, and the stressed. I sometimes go up to 1000mg but don't feel right if I go above that. I am gaining 1 pound per week for the last 14 weeks by weightliftingand eating lots ofpeanuts. I feel much stronger but am somewhat sore, tired and sleepmore. If I move back to UCLA I may try to get a job as a movie star. Too bad I didn't get that idea when I was a teenager hanging out on Santa Monica beach with Arnold Schwarzenegger. http://www.centralcasting.com/

Interesting article below on the Vikings. They had good teeth due to their their sugar-free and grain-free diet. Many problems can be prevented by traditional diets and lifestyles. Maybe eating orange peelings is better than Vitamin C pills. I put citrus peel into my tea and feel better unless that citrus peel has too much pesticides on it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_pauling Pauling was descended from Prussian farmers, who had immigrated to a German settlement in Concordia, Missouri. Pauling's motherwas of English/Scottish descent. Pauling was raised as a member of the Lutheran Church. One of the most influential chemists in history and ranks among the most important scientists of the 20th century. Pauling was included in a list of the 20 greatest scientists of all time by the magazine New Scientist, with Albert Einstein being the only other scientist from the 20th century on the list. Millennium Essay in Nature claimed that Pauling was one of the greatest thinkers and visionaries of the millennium, along with Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. Pauling was one of the founders of the fields of quantum chemistry and molecular biology. Pauling is the only person to be awarded two unshared Nobel Prizes. At Caltech, Pauling struck up a close friendship with theoretical physicist Robert Oppenheimer. The two men planned to mount a joint attack on the nature of the chemical bond. Their relationship soured when Pauling began to suspect that Oppenheimer was becoming too close to his wife. During the beginning of the Manhattan Project, Robert Oppenheimer invited him to be in charge of the Chemistry division of the project, but he declined, not wanting to uproot his family. Pauling's work on vitamin C in his later years generated much controversy. Pauling took 3 grams of vitamin C every day to prevent colds. In 1996, the Linus Pauling Institute moved to Oregon State University, where it continues to conduct research on micronutrients, phytochemicals (chemicals from plants), and other constituents of the diet in preventing and treating disease. http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminC/ vitamin C levels in plasma and circulating cells become fully saturated at intakes of about 400 mg/day in young, healthy nonsmokers. These observations are consistent with other data that intakes of about 400 mg/day are associated with reduced risk of heart disease. vitamin C requirements are increased in the elderly. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_C_megadosage

http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2013/02/24/172688806/ancient-chompers-were-healthier-than-ours

Prehistoric humans didn't have toothbrushes. They didn't have floss or toothpaste, and they certainly didn't have Listerine. Yet somehow, their mouths were a lot healthier than ours are today."Hunter-gatherers had really good teeth," says Alan Cooper, director of the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA. "But as soon as you get to farming populations, you see this massive change. Huge amounts of gum disease. And cavities start cropping up."And thousands of years later, we're still waging, and often losing, our war against oral disease.

Our changing diets are largely to blame.

In a study published in the latest Nature Genetics, Cooper and his research team looked at calcified plaque on ancient teeth from 34 prehistoric human skeletons. What they found was that as our diets changed over time — shifting from meat, vegetables and nuts to carbohydrates and sugar — so too did the composition of bacteria in our mouths.Not all oral bacteria are bad. In fact, many of these microbes help us by protecting against more dangerous pathogens.However, the researchers found that as prehistoric humans transitioned from hunting and gathering to farming, certain types of disease-causing bacteria that were particularly efficient at using carbohydrates started to win out over other types of "friendly" bacteria in human mouths. The addition of processed flour and sugar during the Industrial Revolution only made matters worse.

"What you've really created is an ecosystem which is very low in diversity and full of opportunistic pathogens that have jumped in to utilize the resources which are now free," Cooper says.And that's a problem, because the dominance of harmful bacteria means that our mouths are basically in a constant state of disease."You're walking around with a permanent immune response, which is not a good thing," says Cooper. "It causes problems all over the place."In addition to oral disease, those problems may include diabetes, obesity and even heart disease.

Bacteria make up approximately 90 percent of the cells in our bodies. He believes that we focus too much on ourselves and not enough on this so-called microbiome."We brush our teeth and we floss, and we think that we've got good oral hygiene. But we're completely failing to deal with the underlying problem," he says. "Ten years from now, I think we're going to find that the whole microbiome is a key part of what you get monitored for and treated for."

As for right now, Cooper suggests that one way to help return your microbiome to a healthier, more balanced state might be to cut out all of those processed carbs and start eating like our ancestors.Sounds like he's another fan of the paleo diet.

Saturday, February 23, 2013

Economic Growth since 1875. Bankrupt banks and the Fed damage growth

Graph attached from U Minnesota, an Ivory Tower Free Market alternative to the east coast Ivy League Keynesian Macroeconomicestablishment.The great depression was really a big catastrophe. Our recent recession is not nearly so bad. Fiscal cliff sequestration cuts to government spending hopefully will begin March 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budget_sequestration

http://www.econ.umn.edu/~tkehoe/Compare U.S. economic growth over the period 1875-2010 to a 2 percent per year trend. Notice how trivial business cycle fluctuations are in comparison to the 1929-39 Great Depression. We need new tools to study great depressions. A book, edited by Tim Kehoe and Ed Prescott, provides these tools. Written a short paper explaining how studying great depressions of the past is essential for understanding the recent financial crisis. Bloomberg News in March 2009 about the relevance of this paper for the U.S. financial crisis.

http://www.econ.umn.edu/~tkehoe/papers/BloombergMar09.pdfSome Banks Must Die So the U.S. Economy Can Live.Historical evidence suggests that “bad government policies are responsible for causing great depressions,” writeTimothy J. Kehoe, professor of economics at the University of Minnesota. He’s opposed to rewarding people who made bad investments. “The TARP money disappeared; it wasscandalous,” Kehoe says, referring to the Treasury’s Troubled Asset Relief Program. “It went to people whomade bad investments to try to pull them out.”study Kehoe and Edward Prescott,recipient of the 2004 Nobel Prize in economics, have been running at the Minneapolis Fed, analyzing depressionsin North America and Western Europe in the 1930s, Latin American in the 1980s and isolated exampleselsewhere.“All these depressions are associated with bad policies that depress the efficiency of production,” Prescott says ina phone interview. “The focus should be on productivity. History provides no support for stimulus.”The current crisis and recession may be different than previous ones in terms of their size and scope, but thatdoes nothing to contradict Kehoe’s belief that the financial system needs to be “cleaned out.”

Economic Growth since 1875. Bankrupt banks and the Fed damage growth

Graph attached from U Minnesota, an Ivory Tower free market alternative to the east coast Ivy League Keynesian establishment. The great depression was really a big catastrophe. Our recent recession is not nearly so bad. Fiscal cliff sequestration cuts to government spending hopefully will begin March 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Budget_sequestration

http://www.econ.umn.edu/~tkehoe/ Compare U.S. economic growth over the period 1875-2010 to a 2 percent per year trend. Notice how trivial business cycle fluctuations are in comparison to the 1929-39 Great Depression. We need new tools to study great depressions. A book, edited by Tim Kehoe and Ed Prescott, provides these tools. Written a short paper explaining how studying great depressions of the past is essential for understanding the recent financial crisis. Bloomberg News in March 2009 about the relevance of this paper for the U.S. financial crisis.

http://www.econ.umn.edu/~tkehoe/papers/BloombergMar09.pdf Some Banks Must Die So the U.S. Economy Can Live. Historical evidence suggests that “bad government policies are responsible for causing great depressions,” write Timothy J. Kehoe, professor of economics at the University of Minnesota. He’s opposed to rewarding people who made bad investments. “The TARP money disappeared; it was scandalous,” Kehoe says, referring to the Treasury’s Troubled Asset Relief Program. “It went to people who made bad investments to try to pull them out.” study Kehoe and Edward Prescott, recipient of the 2004 Nobel Prize in economics, have been running at the Minneapolis Fed, analyzing depressions in North America and Western Europe in the 1930s, Latin American in the 1980s and isolated examples elsewhere. “All these depressions are associated with bad policies that depress the efficiency of production,” Prescott says in a phone interview. “The focus should be on productivity. History provides no support for stimulus.” The current crisis and recession may be different than previous ones in terms of their size and scope, but that does nothing to contradict Kehoe’s belief that the financial system needs to be “cleaned out.”

long term U.S. GDP

Friday, February 22, 2013

drought, aquifer, north american super corridor, drugs, corruption, murder

Bright sunny day but cold. We got an inch of snow last night bringing us to 2 inches this winter. Winters around here are very mild, dry, and sunny due to the far south latitude.

Interesting that the USA drought has moved right on top of the Ogalalla aquifer. And that same area is the coldest today.

Interesting that the NASCO corridor seems to be planned to speed up drug imports from Mexico. Do you think NAFTA and world trade is all its cracked up to be? Do we really need drugs and junk from all over the world? Drugs lead to black-on-black violence and murder. Why doesn't Obama try to stop these crimes by tightening the border with Mexico? Seems that government is often the problem, not the solution. Is USA becoming as corrupt as Mexico?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_American_SuperCorridor_CoalitionNorth America's Corridor Coalition (NASCO) is a non-profit organization that seeks to develop an international multi-modal transportation system which will improve trade competitiveness and quality of life in North America
[gallery]

2008 meltdown predicted in advance

Many predicted the 2008 meltdown years in advance. Just another example.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123086154114948151.html

To outline his fears about the U.S. economy, he picked a tough crowd. It was August 2005, at an annual gathering of high-powered economists at Jackson Hole, Wyo. -- and that year they were honoring Alan Greenspan. Mr. Greenspan, a giant of 20th-century economic policy, was about to retire as Federal Reserve chairman after presiding over a historic period of economic growth. Mr. Rajan, a professor at the University of Chicago, chose that moment to deliver a paper called "Has Financial Development Made the World Riskier?" His answer: Yes. Mr. Rajan quickly came under attack as an antimarket Luddite, wistful for old days of regulation. Today, however, few are dismissing his ideas. The financial crisis has savaged the reputation of Mr. Greenspan and others now seen as having turned a blind eye toward excessive risk-taking. Mr. Rajan says he had planned to write about how financial developments during Mr. Greenspan's 18-year tenure made the world safer. But the more he looked, the less he believed that. In the end, with Mr. Greenspan watching from the audience, he argued that disaster might loom.

Incentives were horribly skewed in the financial sector, with workers reaping rich rewards for making money, but being only lightly penalized for losses, Mr. Rajan argued. That encouraged financial firms to invest in complex products with potentially big payoffs, which could on occasion fail spectacularly. He pointed to "credit-default swaps," which act as insurance against bond defaults. He said insurers and others were generating big returns selling these swaps with the appearance of taking on little risk, even though the pain could be immense if defaults actually occurred. Mr. Rajan also argued that because banks were holding a portion of the credit securities they created on their books, if those securities ran into trouble, the banking system itself would be at risk. Banks would lose confidence in one another, he said: "The interbank market could freeze up, and one could well have a full-blown financial crisis." Two years later, that's essentially what happened.

Many of the big names in Jackson Hole weren't ready to hear the warning. Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, famous among economists for his blistering attacks, told the audience he found "the basic, slightly lead-eyed premise of Rajan's paper to be misguided."


[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwpnH_OTZio&w=560&h=315]

Crash prediction: U Chicago Professor wins Deutsche Bank Prize in Financial Economics

Many predicted the 2008 meltdown years in advance. Just another example.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123086154114948151.htmlTo outline his fears about the U.S. economy, he picked a tough crowd. It was August 2005, at an annual gathering of high-powered economists at Jackson Hole, Wyo. -- and that year they were honoring Alan Greenspan. Mr. Greenspan, a giant of 20th-century economic policy, was about to retire as Federal Reserve chairman after presiding over a historic period of economic growth. Mr. Rajan, a professor at the University of Chicago, chose that moment to deliver a paper called "Has Financial Development Made the World Riskier?" His answer: Yes. Mr. Rajan quickly came under attack as an antimarket Luddite, wistful for old days of regulation. Today, however, few are dismissing his ideas. The financial crisis has savaged the reputation of Mr. Greenspan and others now seen as having turned a blind eye toward excessive risk-taking. Mr. Rajan says he had planned to write about how financial developments during Mr. Greenspan's 18-year tenure made the world safer. But the more he looked, the less he believed that. In the end, with Mr. Greenspan watching from the audience, he argued that disaster might loom.

Incentives were horribly skewed in the financial sector, with workers reaping rich rewards for making money, but being only lightly penalized for losses, Mr. Rajan argued. That encouraged financial firms to invest in complex products with potentially big payoffs, which could on occasion fail spectacularly. He pointed to "credit-default swaps," which act as insurance against bond defaults. He said insurers and others were generating big returns selling these swaps with the appearance of taking on little risk, even though the pain could be immense if defaults actually occurred. Mr. Rajan also argued that because banks were holding a portion of the credit securities they created on their books, if those securities ran into trouble, the banking system itself would be at risk. Banks would lose confidence in one another, he said: "The interbank market could freeze up, and one could well have a full-blown financial crisis." Two years later, that's essentially what happened.

Many of the big names in Jackson Hole weren't ready to hear the warning. Former Treasury Secretary Lawrence Summers, famous among economists for his blistering attacks, told the audience he found "the basic, slightly lead-eyed premise of Rajan's paper to be misguided."

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Professor Blogs. Or anybody with ideas to broadcast

All professors need a blog. Grandfathers, authors and anybody who has something to broadcast needs a blog. A blog is just "content management software" for throwing together a website that anybody can read, look at pictures, watch movies, post messages, participate in discussions, etc. Don't repeat yourself, just throw it online in a blog. It is easy nowadays.

Edublogs powers 1,653,790 since 2005. Used by Stanford, Carnegie Tech and hundreds of universities to help their faculty put together a website using Wordpress that powers 10%-20% of the internet. A good company for amateurs but I prefer to do-it-myself. I have set up several blogs. Amazingly easy and cheap. $3 per month to $9 per month from godaddy.com or 1und1.de or dozens of other hosting companies that often have 1-click installs or install yourself in 20 minutes for better result. Or free at http://www.edublogs.org/ or http://www.wordpress.com You can get paid for your site by adding google or bing advertisements at the cost of irritating your readers.

I dump everything into my blogs -- papers, emails, photos, videos, ideas, readings... I click their browser widget on everything interesting that I read to save that text and link into my secret blog. Faster and easier than bookmarks or history to grab text and post a link. I can search on my own blog to find out what I said in the past or found online in the past. This alone is reason enough to blog, even if nobody reads my blog. But the real power of blogging is broadcasting ideas and getting feedback online. That is the direction education is taking.

It may be worth freezing in the expensive multicultural big city to experience the Minneapolis Ivory Tower intellectual culture http://www.math.umn.edu/ Much nicer than the U Chicago or Yale New Haven ghettos.

Monday, February 18, 2013

Gold Price Crash or 20 year Bear Market?

I attach graphs for gold price and the CPI. Gold at 1600 is twice the 800 it was circa 1980. CPI was 80 back in 1980 but is nearly tripled now to 240.

ln(1600/800)/(2013-1980) = ln(2)/33 = 2.1% return on gold per annum
ln(240/80)/(2013-1980) = ln(3)/33 = 3.4% inflation rate per annum

So gold is not keeping pace with inflation. Some Billionaires have already sold off a lot of their gold. Is it time to sell all gold? Will it be a crash or another 20 year bear market?

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-14/billionaires-soros-bacon-reduce-gold-holdings-as-prices-slump.html

Billionaire investors George Soros and Louis Moore Bacon cut their stakes in exchange-traded products backed by gold last quarter as futures dropped the most in more than eight years. Soros Fund Management LLC reduced its investment in the SPDR Gold Trust, the biggest fund backed by the metal, by 55 percent to 600,000 shares as of Dec. 31 from three months earlier. Bacon’s Moore Capital Management LP sold its entire stake in the SPDR fund... The fourth-quarter decisions may bolster speculation that gold’s 12-year bull-run is coming to an end as economic data from the U.S. to China show signs of recovery, curbing haven demand.

GOLD

CPI urban

gold price crash or bear market?

I attach graphs for gold price and the CPI. Gold at 1600 is twice the 800 it was circa 1980. CPI was 80 back in 1980 but is nearly tripled now to 240.

ln(1600/800)/(2013-1980) = ln(2)/33 = 2.1% return on gold per annum ln(240/80)/(2013-1980) = ln(3)/33 = 3.4% inflation rate per annum

So gold is not keeping pace with inflation. Some Billionaires have already sold off a lot of their gold. Is it time to sell all gold? Will it be a crash or another 20 year bear market?

Joe

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-14/billionaires-soros-bacon-reduce-gold-holdings-as-prices-slump.html

Billionaire investors George Soros and Louis Moore Bacon cut their stakes in exchange-traded products backed by gold last quarter as futures dropped the most in more than eight years. Soros Fund Management LLC reduced its investment in the SPDR Gold Trust, the biggest fund backed by the metal, by 55 percent to 600,000 shares as of Dec. 31 from three months earlier. Bacon’s Moore Capital Management LP sold its entire stake in the SPDR fund...

The fourth-quarter decisions by Soros and Bacon may bolster speculation that gold’s 12-year bull-run is coming to an end as economic data from the U.S. to China show signs of recovery, curbing haven demand.

Gold futures fell to a five-month low today.

“The reduction in holdings by George Soros may unnerve the market a little bit,”

Hedge funds have cut bets on a gold rally by 56 percent since reaching a 13-month high in October as manufacturing rebounded
[gallery]
These rankings closely match what I have learned. Many factors, hard to weight together correctly. They somewhat lag regional economic conditions.

http://www.statemaster.com/graph/lif_bes_sta_to_liv-lifestyle-best-states-to-live&v=0927

Showing latest available data.
Rank States Amount
# 1 New Hampshire:35.45
# 2 Minnesota: 33.86
# 3 Vermont: 31.73
# 4 Wyoming: 31.61
# 5 Virginia: 31.57
# 6 Iowa: 31.41
# 7 Massachusetts:30.8
# 8 New Jersey: 30.77
# 9 South Dakota: 30.73
# 10 Nebraska: 30.52
# 11 North Dakota: 30.43
# 12 Maryland: 30.25
# 13 Wisconsin: 29.75
# 14 Connecticut: 29.68
# 15 Maine: 29.36
# 16 Colorado: 28
# 17 Delaware: 27.66
# 18 Idaho: 27.32
# 19 Utah: 27.14
# 20 Kansas: 26.8
# 21 Indiana: 26.11
# 22 Missouri: 25.82
# 23 Rhode Island: 25.77
# 24 Montana: 25.5
# 25 Washington: 25.07
# 26 Hawaii: 25.02
# 27 Alaska: 24.98
# 28 Michigan: 24.47
# 29 Nevada: 24.41
# 30 New York: 24.09
# 31 Illinois: 23.91
= 32 Ohio: 23.86
= 32 Pennsylvania: 23.86
# 34 Oregon: 22.73
# 35 California: 22.27
# 36 Arizona: 22.11
# 37 Florida: 21.82
# 38 Georgia: 21.77
# 39 Alabama: 21
# 40 North Carolina:20.61
# 41 Kentucky: 20.48
# 42 New Mexico: 20.43
# 43 Oklahoma: 20.37
# 44 South Carolina:20.34
# 45 Texas: 19.93
# 46 West Virginia:19.64
# 47 Tennessee: 19.5
# 48 Arkansas: 19.25
# 49 Louisiana: 17.25
# 50 Mississippi: 16.11
Weighted average:25.5


DEFINITION: Livability Index by state. "To determine a state's 'Livability Rating,' each state's rankings for 44 factors were averaged. The scale is 1 to 50, the higher the number, the better. Data used are for the most recent year in which comparable numbers are available from most states. All factors were given equal weight. States with no data available for a given category were ranked based only on the remaining factors. In our book, data are listed from highest to lowest. However, for purposes of this award, we inverted rankings for those factors we determined to be 'positive.' Thus the state with the highest median income in the book (ranking 1st) would be given a number 50 ranking for this award." - Morgan Quitno Press

SOURCE: Morgan Quitno Press, 2005

best states

Sunny hi 66 yesterday warm for mid-February. These rankings closely match what I have learned. Many factors, hard to weight together correctly. They somewhat lag regional economic conditions.

http://www.statemaster.com/graph/lif_bes_sta_to_liv-lifestyle-best-states-to-live&v=0927

Showing latest available data.
Rank States Amount # 1 *New Hampshire* : 35.45
# 2 *Minnesota* : 33.86
# 3 *Vermont* : 31.73
# 4 *Wyoming* : 31.61
# 5 *Virginia* : 31.57 # 6 *Iowa* : 31.41
# 7 *Massachusetts* : 30.8
# 8 *New Jersey* : 30.77
# 9 *South Dakota* : 30.73
# 10 *Nebraska* : 30.52
# 11 *North Dakota* : 30.43
# 12 *Maryland* : 30.25
# 13 *Wisconsin* : 29.75
# 14 *Connecticut* : 29.68
# 15 *Maine* : 29.36
# 16 *Colorado* : 28
# 17 *Delaware* : 27.66
# 18 *Idaho* : 27.32 # 19 *Utah* : 27.14
# 20 *Kansas* : 26.8
# 21 *Indiana* : 26.11
# 22 *Missouri* : 25.82
# 23 *Rhode Island* : 25.77
# 24 *Montana* : 25.5
# 25 *Washington* : 25.07
# 26 *Hawaii* : 25.02
# 27 *Alaska* : 24.98
# 28 *Michigan* : 24.47
# 29 *Nevada* : 24.41
# 30 *New York* : 24.09
# 31 *Illinois* : 23.91 = 32 *Ohio* : 23.86
= 32 *Pennsylvania* : 23.86
# 34 *Oregon* : 22.73
# 35 *California* : 22.27
# 36 *Arizona* : 22.11
# 37 *Florida* : 21.82
# 38 *Georgia* : 21.77
# 39 *Alabama* : 21
# 40 *North Carolina* : 20.61
# 41 *Kentucky* : 20.48
# 42 *New Mexico* : 20.43
# 43 *Oklahoma* : 20.37
# 44 *South Carolina* : 20.34
# 45 *Texas* : 19.93
# 46 *West Virginia* : 19.64
# 47 *Tennessee* : 19.5
# 48 *Arkansas* : 19.25
# 49 *Louisiana* : 17.25
# 50 *Mississippi* : 16.11

*Weighted average:* 25.5

*DEFINITION:*Livability Index by state. "To determine a state's 'Livability Rating,' each state's rankings for 44 factors were averaged. The scale is 1 to 50, the higher the number, the better. Data used are for the most recent year in which comparable numbers are available from most states. All factors were given equal weight. States with no data available for a given category were ranked based only on the remaining factors. In our book, data are listed from highest to lowest. However, for purposes of this award, we inverted rankings for those factors we determined to be 'positive.' Thus the state with the highest median income in the book (ranking 1st) would be given a number 50 ranking for this award." - Morgan Quitno Press

*SOURCE:*Morgan Quitno Press , 2005

Sunday, February 17, 2013

protect yourself. be anonymous online. click to try it.

Privacy should be automatic, not something you have to make special efforts to acquire. Hackers, spies, snoops, and thieves should have to do more work to rob you of your rights, your money, your house, or your identity.

http://anonymouse.org/

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*Anonymization since 1997
Protect yourprivacy, protect yourdata, protect it forfree.*
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Saturday, February 16, 2013

Yale Suing Former Students Shows Crisis in Loans to Poor

South Korea is still a danger, now with nukes. But how can they use those nukes? If they attack South Korea or any ally they will be bombed, invaded, and taken over. They can't be so crazy as to use their nukes. Or are they?

College loans are similar to Home loans. The government subsidized and encouraged the poor to take out loans for houses and college classes. But they paid too much for the classes they took and houses they bought. So the poor got into trouble repaying the loans. Now they lose the house and the years wasted in college. And they are being hounded by creditors and universities and have ruined their credit rating.

Republicans get rich from Democrat schemes to help the poor.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-05/yale-suing-former-students-shows-crisis-in-loans-to-poor.html

Yale Suing Former Students Shows Crisis in Loans to Poor. Needy borrowers are defaulting on almost $1 billion in federal student loans earmarked for the poor, leaving schools such as Yale University and the University of Pennsylvania with little choice except to sue their graduates. The record defaults on federal Perkins loans may jeopardize the prospects of current students since they are part of a revolving fund that colleges give to students who show extraordinary financial hardship. Yale, Penn and George Washington University have all sued former students over nonpayment, court records show. While no one tracks the number of lawsuits, students defaulted on $964 million in Perkins loans in the year ended June 2011, 20 percent more than five years earlier,

Korea nukes; Yale university sues poor students defaulted on loans

I am driving north to look at some real estate for a few days. Been sunny most days. We did get a half inch of snow last night but still sunny today. Total of less than one inch of snow this winter.

South Korea is still a danger, now with nukes. But how can they use those nukes? If they attackSouth Korea or any ally they will be bombed, invaded, and taken over. They can't be so crazy as to use their nukes. Or are they?

College loans are similar to Home loans. The government subsidized and encouraged the poor to take out loans for houses and college classes. But they paid too much for what classes they took and houses they bought. So got into trouble repaying the loans. Now they lose the house and the years wasted in college. And now they are being hounded by creditorsand universities and have ruined their credit rating.


http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-05/yale-suing-former-students-shows-crisis-in-loans-to-poor.html

Yale Suing Former Students Shows Crisis in Loans to Poor

Needy U.S. borrowers are defaulting on almost $1 billion in federal student loans earmarked for the poor, leaving schools such as Yale University and the University of Pennsylvania with little choice except to sue their graduates.
The record defaults on federal Perkins loans may jeopardize the prospects of current students since they are part of a revolving fund that colleges give to students who show extraordinary financial hardship.

Yale, Penn and George Washington University have all sued former students over nonpayment, court records show. While no one tracks the number of lawsuits, students defaulted on $964 million in Perkins loans in the year ended June 2011, 20 percent more than five years earlier,

Idiot Krugman Says Low Fed Rates Key to Housing Recovery

USA does not need more houses. USA health is destroyed by driving too much to distant houses and eating junk food. Raise cows on the land that is being built on. Plant vegetable gardens as Mrs. Obama recommends. Exercise instead of driving. Require people to bike to work. Savers should be paid interest so they can spend. Let interest rates rise to their market level.

Krugman Says Low Fed Rates Key to Housing Recovery

via Krugman Says Low Fed Rates Key to Housing Recovery: Video - Bloomberg.

Thursday, February 14, 2013

Mergers: US American Airlines. Bank of America ARvest

Bright Sunny days here, just a little cool. Two mergers announced the same day: I have been using BofA since 1961. Versateller card is useful. Not sure if this will work out. I guess I am automatically out of Bank of America unless I do something. I will probably start using USAA bank. I do use USAA insurance already since 1970. One stop shopping. Bank of America used to be HQ San Francisco. Moved to North Carolina. Now Arkansas is gobbling up their branches around here. I have been using American Airlines Frequent Flier miles since 1983. I need to use some soon or lose them.

http://www.kansascity.com/2013/02/13/4065479/ap-sources-american-airlines-us.html

DALLAS — American Airlines and US Airways agreed Thursday to merge in an $11 billion deal that would create the world's biggest airline. The combined carrier will be called American Airlines and be based in Fort Worth. It expects to have $40 billion in annual revenue and offer more than 6,700 daily flights to 336 destinations in 56 countries. The deal is a coup for smaller US Airways Group Inc., and was driven by the persistence of its CEO, Doug Parker, who will run the combined airline. Parker sought a merger almost as soon as American parent AMR Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in November 2011.


joplinglobe.com

Arvest Bank will buy 29 Bank of America locations in the region, including several in Southwest Missouri and one in Southeast Kansas. Several more Bank of America locations in southern Missouri from Branson east to Mountain Grove and West Plains also are being sold, as are banks in Muskogee and Tahlequah in Oklahoma, and in several locations in Arkansas. In all, Doll said, the 29 locations have about $750 million in deposits and represent about 65,000 customers. Doll said the acquisition needs regulatory approval from the Federal Reserve Board and from bank regulators in Arkansas, where Arvest is based. “We anticipate approval of that in the first quarter of next year,” he said. “Once the conversion is complete, those accounts will be Arvest accounts.” He said the bank will work to get new Arvest checkbooks, debit and ATM cards, and other products to Bank of America customers. Arvest also will be evaluating hours and other services at those banks. Doll said customers may find extended lobby and drive-up hours, and should be “very pleased with the fee structure.” Doll also said teams of Arvest executives are visiting the Bank of America locations to meet with employees.

Mergers: US American Airlines. Bank of America ARvest.

Bright Sunny days here, just a little cool. Two mergers announced the same day: I have been using BofA since 1961. Versateller card is useful. Not sure if this will work out. I guess I am automatically out of Bank of America unless I do something. I will probably start using USAA bank. I do use USAA insurance already since 1970. One stop shopping. Bank of America used to be HQ San Francisco. Moved to North Carolina. Now Arkansas is gobbling up their branches around here. I have been using American Airlines Frequent Flier miles since 1983. I need to use some soon or lose them.

http://www.kansascity.com/2013/02/13/4065479/ap-sources-american-airlines-us.html

DALLAS — American Airlines and US Airways agreed Thursday to merge in an $11 billion deal that would create the world's biggest airline.The combined carrier will be called American Airlines and be based in Fort Worth. It expects to have $40 billion in annual revenue and offer more than 6,700 daily flights to 336 destinations in 56 countries.The deal is a coup for smaller US Airways Group Inc., and was driven by the persistence of its CEO, Doug Parker, who will run the combined airline. Parker sought a merger almost as soon as American parent AMR Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in November 2011.

joplinglobe.com

Arvest Bank will buy 29 Bank of America locations in the region, including several in Southwest Missouri and one in Southeast Kansas.Several more Bank of America locations in southern Missouri from Branson east to Mountain Grove and West Plains also are being sold, as are banks in Muskogee and Tahlequah in Oklahoma, and in several locations in Arkansas.In all, Doll said, the 29 locations have about $750 million in deposits and represent about 65,000 customers.Doll said the acquisition needs regulatory approval from the Federal Reserve Board and from bank regulators in Arkansas, where Arvest is based.“We anticipate approval of that in the first quarter of next year,” he said. “Once the conversion is complete, those accounts will be Arvest accounts.”He said the bank will work to get new Arvest checkbooks, debit and ATM cards, and other products to Bank of America customers. Arvest also will be evaluating hours and other services at those banks. Doll said customers may find extended lobby and drive-up hours, and should be “very pleased with the fee structure.” Doll also said teams of Arvest executives are visiting the Bank of America locations to meet with employees.

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Arkansas vs Minnesota. Birds of a feather tend to flock together.

Birds of a feather tend to flock together. Minnesota is one of the richest and healthiest states with the best education system K-12 and the most Blondes. Arkansas has more crime, murder, illness, death, teen pregnancy, heat, humidity. But Arkansas does have more cheap houses and rural houses and hunting and not so much agriculture. Fort Smith Arkansas is somewhat white people and nestled between 2 mountain ranges rather dramatic with great freeway, train, bus access -- probably the best place to live, 2nd largest city in AR. Minneapolis is very big 3.3 million, bigger than San Diego http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_Statistical_Area


Arkansas Minnesota
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hot Summers Cold Winters Weather
Rugged Flat Terrain
Walmart Target Headquarters
Worst Best Schools K-12
Worst Best Health
874.6 651.8 Death Rate http://www.statehealthfacts.org/comparemaptable.jsp?ind=58&cat=2
76.1 years 80.9 years Life Expectancy
30.9% 25.7% Obesity Rate http://healthyamericans.org/report/98/obseityratesbystate
7 47 Rank Most Teen Pregnancy http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/USTPtrends.pdf
3,911.0 2,893.1 2 Property Crime Rate http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2012/tables/12s0308.pdf
5.5 1.4 Murder Rate 2011 http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/murder-rates-nationally-and-state
33,740 44,560 Per Capita Income http://bber.unm.edu/econ/us-pci.htm
31,020 39,404 Income after Taxes http://lwd.dol.state.nj.us/labor/lpa/industry/incpov/dpci.htm
10.0% 10.8% Tax Burden 2010 http://taxfoundation.org/article/state-and-local-tax-burdens-all-states-one-year-1977-2010

Arkansas:
74.2% non-Hispanic White
15.6% Black
0.9% American Indian Native
1.3% Asian
6.6% Latinos
39.0% of Arkansas's population younger than age 1 were minorities.
Education in Arkansas has historically been a major issue, and is a
problem that continues to this day. Part of the problem has been the
resistance to needed reforms, including low teacher salaries and small
budgets for spending on students. The state's refusal to integrate,
refusal to teach evolution, and poor school facilities also contribute
to the poor performance of Arkansas students. Arkansas's education
funding mechanism was found unconstitutional in 1983 and again in
2001. Arkansas's culture is the frequent application of a "poor,
banjo-picking hillbilly" reputation to the state and her citizens.
Arkansans have developed "a mass inferiority complex unique in
American history" regarding their state's enduring image.

Minnesota:
White: 86.9%
African American: 5.4%
American Indian Native: 1.1%
Asian: 4.0%
Hispanic: 4.7%

ancestries of Minnesota 2010:

37.9% German
32.1% from the Nordic countries; (16.8% Norwegian, 9.5% Swedish,
Finnish, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese and Karelian)
11.7% Irish
6.3% English
5.1% Polish
4.2% French American
3.7% Czech

Blondes: Having lived in both LA and MN, I'd give it to MN. LA
certainly has a lot of blonde people just because there are a lot of
people, period, but it's nothing like in most parts of Minnesota. I
think of LA as very definitely an overall dark hair kind of place, and
I don't think that -- when talking about LA, not necessarily the state
as a whole -- it's not exaggerating to say that there's a very strong
Hispanic Asian influence. after moving back to MN from CA I was still
startled by the sheer number of natural blondes.

Minnesota's leading fine art museums include the Minneapolis Institute
of Arts, the Walker Art Center, the Frederick R. Weisman Art Museum,
and the The Museum of Russian Art . All are located in Minneapolis.
The Minnesota Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra are
prominent full-time professional musical ensembles that perform
concerts and offer educational programs to the Twin Cities' community.
The world-renowned Guthrie Theater moved into a new Minneapolis
facility in 2006, boasting three stages and overlooking the
Mississippi River. Attendance at theatrical, musical, and comedy
events in the area is strong. Twin Cities' number of theater seats per
capita ranks behind only New York City






How Foreign Students Hurt U.S. Innovation

Good article, decades after the problem was obvious. Corruption in government funding of education.

F-1 program, as it is known, has become a profit center for universities and a wage-suppression tool for the technology industry. International students are attractive to strapped colleges because they tend to pay full tuition or, in the case of public institutions, pay more than full price in out-of-state rates.

via How Foreign Students Hurt U.S. Innovation - Bloomberg.

Monday, February 11, 2013

The real economy is substantially higher than in 2000. The stock market also higher. The smaller companies in the Wilshire 5000 are doing better than the bigger companies in the S&P 500. The Dow Jones big companies are doing fine too. So stocks may have more upside potential as they catch up to the real economy. Is Obama depressing investors when he raised their tax rate from 35% to 38%? Why should workers work if they are subject to onerous taxation? Companies may start to underperform in terms of profits even though they continue to pump out goods and services. The Basel III capital requirements are biting into European banks. That will help the USA which has already bit the bullet and raised bank capital. Outlook looks rosy for USA stocks unless the Obama boom overheats and causes irrational exuberance and a crash.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-11/u-s-stock-futures-rise-s-p-500-contract-gains-0-3-.html

U.S. stocks fell, pulling the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index from a five-year high, as European leaders met to discuss the region’s crisis and investors awaited President Barack Obama’s speech on his legislative priorities.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-11/eu-banks-may-need-to-hit-basel-liquidity-targets-early.html

The EU has struggled to agree on legislation to apply Basel III, as governments and the EU Parliament clashed on a range of issues including curbing banker bonuses, capital rules for systemically important banks, and the liquidity requirements

GDP

Wilshire 5000 total market stock price index

DJIA

SP500

economic and stock price boom, Obama

The real economy is substantially higher than in 2000. The stock market also higher. The smaller companies in the Wilshire 5000 are doing better than the bigger companies in the S&P 500. The Dow Jones big companies are doing fine too. So stocks may have more upside potential as they catch up to the real economy. Is Obama depressing investors when he raised their taxrate from 35% to 38%? Why should workers work if they are subject to onerous taxation? Companies may start to underperformin terms of profits even though they continue to pump out goods and services. The Basel III capital requirements are biting into European banks. That will help the USA which has already bit the bullet and raised bank capital. Outlook looks rosy for USA stocks unless the Obama boom overheats and causes irrational exuberance and a crash. What do you think?

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-11/u-s-stock-futures-rise-s-p-500-contract-gains-0-3-.html

U.S. stocks fell, pulling the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index from a five-year high, as European leaders met to discuss the region’s crisis and investors awaited President Barack Obama’s speech on his legislative priorities.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-11/u-s-stock-futures-rise-s-p-500-contract-gains-0-3-.html

The EU has struggled to agree on legislation to apply Basel III, as governments and the EU Parliament clashed on a range of issues including curbing banker bonuses, capital rules for systemically important banks, and the liquidity requirements

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-02-11/eu-banks-may-need-to-hit-basel-liquidity-targets-early.html
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Too Low Cholesterol Increases Suicide?

A number of scientific studeis have linked low serum cholesterol to suicide, accidents, and violence.  Your brain’s dry weight is 60% fat, and cholesterol plays a vital role in neuron signaling.



According to an article in Psychology Today: “My brain needs cholesterol! So does yours.  Dismantling your body’s ability to make it might have some far-reaching effects.”



via Health News.

Apple Computer Death: Health Hazards of Fruit

Avoid fruits. They are expensive computers and expensive fruits. They taste good but have long term deleterious effects. Use more Ham and Eggs, cheese, butter, sour cream... Dr. Mercola is right but too conservative -- he understates the damage done by fruits and nuts. The highest concentration of cholesterol is in the brain. Craziness and school shootings are in part caused by a diet too low in cholesterol and saturated fats.

Jobs had adopted an all-fruit diet in his younger days, and even the brand he co-founded – Apple – was a nod to his dietary obsession. pancreatic cancer – the disease that killed Steve Jobs at the age of 56. Jobs consumed a fruitarian diet years before he contracted his pancreatic cancer. There could be some relationship. Why Large Amounts of Fruit May Not Be Healthy



via
Surprising Health Hazards Associated with an All-Fruit Diet.

Saturday, February 9, 2013

Crooked analysts or bad forecasters?? Following a Herd of Bulls on Apple

This article indicates why analysts issue too many buy recommendations. Prices will go up after buy recommendations cause sheeple to stampede into the investment. The sheeple then see that increase in price as indication of their superior investment skill. So they buy more. Eventually when the sheeple run out of money the price flattens and then crashes.

http://nyti.ms/VJgWGO NYTimes: Following a Herd of Bulls on Apple Even with reforms meant to reduce conflicts of interest, many analysts failed to foresee a plunge in Apple€™s shares.

studies have shown that analysts are prone to other influences — like following the herd — that can undermine their judgments. “The reforms didn’t necessarily make analysts better at their jobs,” said Stuart C. Gilson, a professor of finance at Harvard Business School.

“Wall Street is full of conflicts. It still is and always will be. It’s incompetent at picking stocks.”

“Before 2002, analyst recommendations were tilted toward optimistic at an extreme rate,” Ohad Kadan, a professor of finance at Washington University in St. Louis

“the most obvious conflict now is that research is funded through the trading desks,” Professor Gilson said. “If you’re an analyst and one way your report brings in revenue is through increased trading, a buy recommendation will do this more than a sell. For a sell, you have to already own the stock to generate a trade. But anybody can potentially buy a stock. That’s one hypothesis about why you still see a disproportionate number of buy recommendations.” That may be especially true for heavily traded stocks like Apple, which generate huge commissions for Wall Street.

why Wall Street analysts are so often wrong: they extrapolate from recent performance data; they chase momentum; they want to please their customers; and they show a tendency toward herd behavior. Which is to say, they fall into the same pitfalls that afflict most investors.

extrapolate past performance into the future. They chase momentum. With Apple, they were right at $600, and they were right at $650, which reinforced the trend. So why would they be wrong at $700?”

“The analysts are in the end sales people,” Professor Greenwald said. “Their credibility depends on their not upsetting their investors too much. Everybody loved Apple, everybody did well. The bears were always wrong. It took an enormous amount of courage to fight the tide.”

“I loved Steve Jobs,” he said. “He built a great company. But he was one of the most arrogant C.E.O.’s I’ve ever met. The way he introduced new products was one big display of arrogance. He ridiculed Microsoft as ‘Micro who?’ That’s a good reason to be cautious. A little humility is a good thing.”


market regulators don’t measure the performance of Wall Street’s research recommendations, and he said he believed that they should require firms to disclose the track records of stocks their analysts recommend. “They’re not being held accountable” for bad recommendations,

Crooked analysts or bad forecasters?? Following a Herd of Bulls on Apple

As you said in 1986 they recommend "buy, buy, buy." This article indicates why analysts issue too many buy recommendations. Prices will go up after buy recommendations cause sheeple to stampede into the investment. The sheeple then see that increase in price as indication of their superior investment skill. So they buy more. Eventually when the sheeple run out of money the price flattens and then crashes.

http://nyti.ms/VJgWGO NYTimes: Following a Herd of Bulls on Apple Even with reforms meant to reduce conflicts of interest, many analysts failed to foresee a plunge in Apple√Ęs shares.

studies have shown that analysts are prone to other influences — like following the herd — that can undermine their judgments. “The reforms didn’t necessarily make analysts better at their jobs,” said Stuart C. Gilson, a professor of finance at Harvard Business School.

“Wall Street is full of conflicts. It still is and always will be. It’s incompetent at picking stocks.”

“Before 2002, analyst recommendations were tilted toward optimistic at an extreme rate,” Ohad Kadan, a professor of finance at Washington University in St. Louis

“the most obvious conflict now is that research is funded through the trading desks,” Professor Gilson said. “If you’re an analyst and one way your report brings in revenue is through increased trading, a buy recommendation will do this more than a sell. For a sell, you have to already own the stock to generate a trade. But anybody can potentially buy a stock. That’s one hypothesis about why you still see a disproportionate number of buy recommendations.” That may be especially true for heavily traded stocks like Apple, which generate huge commissions for Wall Street.

why Wall Street analysts are so often wrong: they extrapolate from recent performance data; they chase momentum; they want to please their customers; and they show a tendency toward herd behavior. Which is to say, they fall into the same pitfalls that afflict most investors.

extrapolate past performance into the future. They chase momentum. With Apple, they were right at $600, and they were right at $650, which reinforced the trend. So why would they be wrong at $700?”

“The analysts are in the end sales people,” Professor Greenwald said. “Their credibility depends on their not upsetting their investors too much. Everybody loved Apple, everybody did well. The bears were always wrong. It took an enormous amount of courage to fight the tide.”

“I loved Steve Jobs,” he said. “He built a great company. But he was one of the most arrogant C.E.O.’s I’ve ever met. The way he introduced new products was one big display of arrogance. He ridiculed Microsoft as ‘Micro who?’ That’s a good reason to be cautious. A little humility is a good thing.”

market regulators don’t measure the performance of Wall Street’s research recommendations, and he said he believed that they should require firms to disclose the track records of stocks their analysts recommend. “They’re not being held accountable” for bad recommendations,

Killers Among Us: Drugs drive people crazy!

This article you forwarded agrees with what I have been saying for a long time. Drugs are causing problems such as school shootings, low IQ, medical costs.... Legal drugs are often paid for by government or government subsidized pharma and insurance companies. Illegal drugs are involved with our middle east war policy and money laundered by government propped up banks. Similar to government financed education leading to stupidity. Doped up stupid mutants may be more easy to control but cause many kinds of social problems beyond school shootings. Law of untended consequences. Illegal and legal drugs are poorly understood by science but do have many complicated impacts on the mental and physical health of people. These problems have been getting worse since the 1960s. And are exacerbated by other lifestyle and social changes that are a flight from tradition.

----------------------------------
The US government in its role as the nanny state, and in cahoots with big pharma, now doles out medications in an attempt to control the behavior of many young minds. Often the most energetic minds, and those least willing to sit still to listen to government propaganda all day long, are the ones pumped with drugs. But just as with government's training of killers and the way the training has different impact on different minds, the medications to force students to sit still all day, doesn't have the same impact on all the same way. The medications will turn some into killers, as witnessed by the killings at Columbine, Aurora and Newtown. Force medications on some students to make them sit still for hours, and some will find ways to break through those mental prisons, sometimes with guns blazing.

Walk into inner cities and you will find students poorly educated by government, who can't get a job because of government minimum wage laws, who are left with few alternatives but to sell drugs. Because government bans the sale of non-prescription drugs, it is a dangerous business. If you are caught selling drugs, you will do major time, and so you will kill those who might rat on you. It creates tough young kids, who don't put a high value on life and so it will result in gun battles for turf.

Yes, he who lives by the sword dies by the sword. And the government of any nation that lives by preventing youth from getting jobs may likely see death as blowback on that nation and that government. The government of any nation that lives by attempting to drug up its youth should not be surprised when a few react with super aggressiveness against that drugging. And a government that trains many, many, many killers, should not be surprised when a few of those government trained killers turn their killing inward inside the nation.

This type killing won't stop until killers are no longer trained by government, until big pharma drugs are no longer forced upon youth and until the inner youth are free to seek jobs and apprenticeships at any any wage.

Until current government policies are changed in a major way, the government will create killers, in one fashion or another. These killers will roam among us and they will continue to kill.

http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2013/02/the-killers-among-us.html?showComment=1360333715848


>
> The US government in its role as the nanny state, and in cahoots with > big pharma, now doles out medications in an attempt to control > the behavior of many young minds. Often the most energetic minds, and > those least willing to sit still to listen to government propaganda > all day long, are the ones pumped with drugs. But just as with > government's training of killers and the way the training has > different impact on different minds, *the medications to force > students to sit still all day, doesn't have the same impact on all the > same way. The medications will turn some into killers, as witnessed by > the killings at Columbine, Aurora and Newtown. Force medications on > some students to make them sit still for hours, and some will find > ways to break through those mental prisons, sometimes with guns blazing.* >
> Walk into inner cities and you will find students poorly educated by > government, who can't get a job because of government minimum wage > laws, who are left with few alternatives but to sell drugs. Because > government bans the sale of non-prescription drugs, it is a dangerous > business. If you are caught selling drugs, you will do major time, and > so you will kill those who might rat on you. It creates tough young > kids, who don't put a high value on life and so it will result in gun > battles for turf. >
> Yes, he who lives by the sword dies by the sword. And the government > of any nation that lives by preventing youth from getting jobs may > likely see death as blowback on that nation and that government. > The government of any nation that lives by attempting to drug up its > youth should not be surprised when a few react with super > aggressiveness against that drugging. And a government that trains > many, many, many killers, should not be surprised when a few of those > government trained killers turn their killing inward inside the nation. >
> This type killing won't stop until killers are no longer trained by > government, until big pharma drugs are no longer forced upon youth and > until the inner youth are free to seek jobs and apprenticeships at any > any wage. >
> Until current government policies are changed in a major way, the > government will create killers, in one fashion or another. These > killers will roam among us and they will continue to kill. >

Drugs, killers, government education

This article you forwarded agrees with what I have been saying for a long time. Drugs are causing problems such as school shootings, low IQ, medical costs.... Legal drugs are often paid for by government or government subsidized pharma and insurance companies. Illegal drugs are involved with our middle east war policy and money laundered by government propped up banks. Similar to government financed education leading to stupidity. Doped up stupid mutants may be more easy to control but cause many kinds of social problems beyond school shootings. Law of untended consequences. Illegal and legal drugs are poorly understood by science but do have many complicated impacts on the mental and physical health of people. These problems have been getting worse since the 1960s. And are exacerbated by other lifestyle and social changes that are a flight from tradition.

--------------------------------------------

The US government in its role as the nanny state, and in cahoots with big pharma, now doles out medications in an attempt to control the behavior of many young minds. Often the most energetic minds, and those least willing to sit still to listen to government propaganda all day long, are the ones pumped with drugs. But just as with government's training of killers and the way the training has different impact on different minds, the medications to force students to sit still all day, doesn't have the same impact on all the same way. The medications will turn some into killers, as witnessed by the killings at Columbine, Aurora and Newtown. Force medications on some students to make them sit still for hours, and some will find ways to break through those mental prisons, sometimes with guns blazing.

Walk into inner cities and you will find students poorly educated by government, who can't get a job because of government minimum wage laws, who are left with few alternatives but to sell drugs. Because government bans the sale of non-prescription drugs, it is a dangerous business. If you are caught selling drugs, you will do major time, and so you will kill those who might rat on you. It creates tough young kids, who don't put a high value on life and so it will result in gun battles for turf.

Yes, he who lives by the sword dies by the sword. And the government of any nation that lives by preventing youth from getting jobs may likely see death as blowback on that nation and that government. The government of any nation that lives by attempting to drug up its youth should not be surprised when a few react with super aggressiveness against that drugging. And a government that trains many, many, many killers, should not be surprised when a few of those government trained killers turn their killing inward inside the nation.

This type killing won't stop until killers are no longer trained by government, until big pharma drugs are no longer forced upon youth and until the inner youth are free to seek jobs and apprenticeships at any any wage.

Until current government policies are changed in a major way, the government will create killers, in one fashion or another. These killers will roam among us and they will continue to kill.

http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2013/02/the-killers-among-us.html?showComment=1360333715848

Friday, February 8, 2013

nukes, Israel, employment: the Obama Recovery

I will just briefly note that the economy continues to recover under Obama. More people are working and they are working harder to avoid getting fired. Employment is increasing at about the same rate as during the George Bush recovery, the Bill Clinton recovery, the Ronald Reagan recovery, the Ford-Carter recovery, and the Kennedy-Johnson-Nixon recovery. Business cycles are just that -- cycles. After a fall the economy rises. The overall trend is upward and that trend shows no sign of reversing. The third graph attached shows a logarithmic graph for the x axis so the vertical distance represents a percentage gain / loss. On a percentage basis the recent George Bush crash was serious but not as bad as the End of World War II Harry Truman economic upheaval http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman#Strikes_and_economic_upheaval

Truman's decision to use nuclear weapons against Japan led to a speedy end of the war but remains controversial. His presidency was a turning point in foreign affairs as the nation supported an internationalist foreign policy in conjunction with European allies. Working closely with Congress, Truman assisted in the founding of the United Nations, issued the Truman Doctrine to contain communism, and passed the $13 billion Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. the Cold War began. He oversaw the Berlin Airlift in 1948 and the creation of NATO in 1949. When communist North Korea invaded South Korea in 1950, he immediately sent in U.S. troops and gained UN approval for the Korean War.

Truman was sympathetic to a Jewish homeland in Palestine. As a senator, he had assured Jewish leaders of his support for Zionism, and at a 1943 rally in Chicago had called for a homeland for those Jews who survived the Nazi regime. A Jewish homeland in Palestine was widely popular in the United States, and Jewish support could be key in the upcoming presidential election. However, State Department officials were reluctant to offend the Arabs, who were opposed to the establishment of a Jewish state in their midst. Secretary of Defense James Forrestal warned Truman of the importance of Saudi Arabian oil in another war; Truman replied that he would decide his policy on the basis of justice, not oil. Truman was weary of both the convoluted politics of the Middle East and of the urgings of Jewish leaders through his term in office, and was undecided on his policy. He later cited as decisive in his decision to recognize the Jewish state the advice of his old business partner, Eddie Jacobson, a non-religious Jew whom Truman absolutely trusted. Marshall believed the paramount threat to the U.S. was the Soviet Union and feared that Arab oil would be lost to the United States in the event of war; he warned Truman that U.S. was "playing with fire with nothing to put it out". Truman recognized the State of Israel on May 14, 1948, eleven minutes after it declared itself a nation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman#Recognition_of_Israel
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Employment: the Obama Recovery. Nukes, Israel

The economy continues to recover under Obama. More people are working and they are working harder to avoid getting fired. Employment is increasing at about the same rate as during the George Bush recovery, the Bill Clinton recovery, the Ronald Reagan recovery, the Ford-Carter recovery, and the Kennedy-Johnson-Nixon recovery. Business cycles are just that -- cycles. After a fall the economy rises. The overall trend is upward and that trend shows no sign of reversing. The third graph attached shows a logarithmic graph for the x axis so the vertical distance represents a percentage gain / loss. On a percentage basis the recent George Bush crash was serious but not as bad as the End of World War II Harry Truman economic upheaval
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman#Strikes_and_economic_upheaval

Truman's decision to use nuclear weapons against Japan led to a speedy end of the war but remains controversial. His presidency was a turning point in foreign affairs as the nation supported an internationalist foreign policy in conjunction with European allies. Working closely with Congress, Truman assisted in the founding of the United Nations, issued the Truman Doctrine to contain communism, and passed the $13 billion Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. the Cold War began. He oversaw the Berlin Airlift in 1948 and the creation of NATO in 1949. When communist North Korea invaded South Korea in 1950, he immediately sent in U.S. troops and gained UN approval for the Korean War.

Truman was sympathetic to a Jewish homeland in Palestine. As a senator, he had assured Jewish leaders of his support for Zionism, and at a 1943 rally in Chicago had called for a homeland for those Jews who survived the Nazi regime. A Jewish homeland in Palestine was widely popular in the United States, and Jewish support could be key in the upcoming presidential election. However, State Department officials were reluctant to offend the Arabs, who were opposed to the establishment of a Jewish state in their midst. Secretary of Defense James Forrestal warned Truman of the importance of Saudi Arabian oil in another war; Truman replied that he would decide his policy on the basis of justice, not oil. Truman was weary of both the convoluted politics of the Middle East and of the urgings of Jewish leaders through his term in office, and was undecided on his policy. He later cited as decisive in his decision to recognize the Jewish state the advice of his old business partner, Eddie Jacobson, a non-religious Jew whom Truman absolutely trusted. Marshall believed the paramount threat to the U.S. was the Soviet Union and feared that Arab oil would be lost to the United States in the event of war; he warned Truman that U.S. was "playing with fire with nothing to put it out". Truman recognized the State of Israel on May 14, 1948, eleven minutes after it declared itself a nation.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_S._Truman#Recognition_of_Israel

nonfarm employment

private employment USPRIV_Max_630_378

logarithmic graph of private employment

Swiss Banks, Petreus, Why I am not in Texas right now

Swiss banks have been exporting financial services (such as secret accounts) for centuries. Similarly Swiss watches and Swiss cheese are popular around the world. The problem with any export economy is that money is imported in an equal and opposite flow. That money has to be invested and right now they are investing in currencies via the central bank. This may not be the best investment but it is a liquid market that they can get out of quickly with low transactions costs. Foreign currencies may be a better gamble than foreign bonds or stocks or real estate or gold. Further, swiss banks are maybe involved with the Libor trading scandal, money laundering, tax evasion (now under pressure by new laws), USA credit default swaps and other derivative scams. Currencies may be the safest and cheapest asset. The central bank can buy currencies from private banks such as UBS in order to prop up capital positions as required by the Basle III global regulations. This will help deflate the swiss currency so that more swiss watches and swiss cheese can be exported. It will also keep money hoarded in the swiss banking system so that swiss workers and poor people cannot get that money. So swiss workers will have their wages deflated and poor swiss will have less welfare benefit money. So poor workers will have to pay more for imported goods and as the swiss currency deflates they will have less money to pay for those increasingly expensive foreign goods. So poor workers will have to eat less, reduce expenditures on luxury items, start a garden, raise a cow,... Similar to what is happening in the USA deflation.

I agree on Petreus. The liberal news media blows everything out of proportion to drive conservatives from power. If Mrs. Petreus has reason to bitch then that is between her and Mr. Petreus. Don't pay money to any publications until the liberal news media cleans up its act.

Lubbock has been in drought for years now. Missouri has lakes everywhere. Clean water with no pollution sources upstream of where I live. Much cheaper and tastier than Lubbock water.
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In the past, Lubbock has received its water from Lake Meredith, which Spear calls “the backbone of West Texas,” supplying water to 11 different cities throughout the region for 40 years. But, due to the constant mining for the resource and the worst drought recorded in 100 years occurring last summer the lake has disappeared.

http://www.dailytoreador.com/news/article_f19d5354-7c7d-11e1-92fb-001a4bcf6878.html?fb_ref=.T37_-1SANYc.like&fb_source=timeline Lubbock began Stage 2 of its drought contingency plan Sunday, which focuses on restricting the use of water on landscapes. Aubrey Spear, director of water resources and environmental management for the City of Lubbock, said 96 percent of the city’s aquifer — the Ogallala Aquifer — is used for landscape and agricultural irrigation. “The biggest way to conserve water is with the irrigation on landscape, is to reduce that landscape irrigation,” he said. “I mean, everyone can do things — like while they’re brushing their teeth they turn off the faucet rather than let it run — but that’s not where our big savings is. The big savings in water is in not putting as much on the landscape.” In the past, Lubbock has received its water from Lake Meredith, which Spear calls “the backbone of West Texas,” supplying water to 11 different cities throughout the region for 40 years. But, due to the constant mining for the resource and the worst drought recorded in 100 years occurring last summer, he said, the lake has disappeared. “It started to decline over time for many different reasons and we expedited another project to help replace Lake Meredith when it disappeared,” Spear said, “and that was Lake Allen Henry to our south-east. The Lake Allen Henry project is being built right now.”